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  1. #1
    Lord Thunderbottom
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    road bike for clyde?

    hey guys, I need something that I can put on loads of base miles this summer and I know little to nothing about road or cross bikes but I'm going to buy one in the near future

    I'm currently 255# without gear, so call it 270#, I want something that will be comfortable and durable for long rides, 3 hours plus, and it has to keep me up with a pretty quick group of guys to boot (yes I know it's mostly the motor but you know what I mean)

    right now my favorite bike to ride on road is my trek sawyer, it's rigid and the steel frame just feels good, I ran it with 32c tires last summer a few times and it was okay but not exactly positioned for speed

    I'm not a huge fan of aluminum the few times I've ridden it with skinny tires, maybe it's better with carbon fork, bars, stem, and seatpost to take out some chatter?

    so what should I be looking for? a pure road bike, a cyclocross, a touring bike?

  2. #2
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    Cross bikes hold up really well under heavy loads as do touring bikes that are designed for normal weight folks carrying half their body weight in gear. Road bikes will have the sharpest handling and weigh the least, followed by cross bikes, then touring bikes will generally be the heaviest and worst handling. Factory cross bike will probably come with smaller chainrings than you'll need to hang with guys on road bikes but if you build one yourself you wont have this issue.

    Just like with mountain bikes, the weakest point will be wheels. Get something with a decent spoke count - at least 32 spokes, maybe more if you're in an area with bad roads. Budget in a decent wheelset on top of the bike purchase.

    How tall are you? Not too many companies make bikes for tall guys. Wont be an issue if you're 270 and 6ft tall, is an issue for most of us that are 270 and closer to 7ft.

  3. #3
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    the one thing that always amazed me about riding on a road bike was how fast/quick I was...

    my fav road build I've ever had was an early 90's trek lugged steel frame, I used a mix of new parts and old stuff... big enough that I could fit 32c tires front and back... it was super comfy to ride on but still a quick ride. the geometry was fairly mild and more of a "touring" type bike...

    all that being said I think the most important part is the fit... you hear that in nearly every thread on bikes but on a road bike I think that is far more important.

    all that being said... I would certainly look at and consider a surly long haul trucker
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  4. #4
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    Road bikes will have the sharpest handling and weigh the least, followed by cross bikes, then touring bikes will generally be the heaviest and worst handling.
    "worst handling" is a subjective thing... a road bike is going to be far more responsive, you don't want that in a touring bike, you want the bike to go where you point it hour after hour, day after day... on the road i'd rather something stable then twitchy... if I was racing a crit then i'd want the quick handling road bike

    sorry I just felt that needed some clarification...
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  5. #5
    Lord Thunderbottom
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    How tall are you? Not too many companies make bikes for tall guys. Wont be an issue if you're 270 and 6ft tall, is an issue for most of us that are 270 and closer to 7ft.
    6'1"

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by donalson View Post
    "worst handling" is a subjective thing... a road bike is going to be far more responsive, you don't want that in a touring bike, you want the bike to go where you point it hour after hour, day after day... on the road i'd rather something stable then twitchy... if I was racing a crit then i'd want the quick handling road bike

    sorry I just felt that needed some clarification...
    For sure, should have written 'slowest handling' since touring bikes are meant to be slow and stable. Relaxed geometry and long chainstays.

  7. #7
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    I'm on a Specialized Allez and it's pretty awesome as far as I am concerned. It handles my weight (285 now but 300ish when I rode it last time last year) no problem.

  8. #8
    I Strava Hamburgers
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    I ride a Norco CCX1, carbon fork, alum frame (Shimano 105 loadout/FSA Cranks). Its completely stock other then some lizard skins I put on it last year and a cassette change a while back.

    I've ridden this bike in multiple races where clay/mud and path are the primary flavor, I've ridden on the road, off the road, on single track, on rail trail. Literally thousands of KM, and I've spent most of my 300lb to 240lb drop ON this particular bike.

    I would love to have a road bike... I would love to have a power meter and all the jazz that comes with it... right up until I pass by a path of some sort, and suddenly want to detour.

    Primarily I ride rail trail and some less technical single track on it, mainly because I like to avoid the road as much as possible just on account of traffic, but I will ride it if I need to, so the Cross bike is obviously the right choice for me.

    Thing is, I can put some road tires on it, and do just fine with it as well should I end up on a massive road ride with someone.

    After all the abuse, the bike owes me nothing, but keeps going day in and day out without anything but a wheel true here and there, and a new chain after a particularly grinding muddy race, apart from that.. I'd say cross bikes can easily get a Clyde Friendly stamp, as well as being fairly wallet friendly.

    Try one out, then try a road bike. See which one you like. If you got a bit bigger bank, you can go look at a Salsa Warbird. Its designed with comfort and long hours in mind, on and off the road as well.

    My .02

    Good luck!
    My EBB so loud
    I'm mashing...

  9. #9
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    ToC-
    I ride a KHS Flite 747. I love it. Cheap and tough. Made for a big and tall guy. Of course I am 6'7" and 240 so it might be a bit tall for you.

    Designed by Zinn, but in production from KHS.

    FLITE 747 | KHS Bicycles

    Bang for the buck, one of the best bike for a tall guy around.

    Eric

  10. #10
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    This one works well for a guy I know.

    Salsa Cycles | Bikes | Fargo Ti

  11. #11
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    I've been lusting a Soma ES road frame for a while now. Steel, smooth-riding geometry and will take a bigger tyre if needed:

    ES | SOMA Fabrications

    One of them with some strong wheels and you'd be set. For the taller chaps, they make them all the way up to a 66cm!

  12. #12
    MaverickMotoMedia.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by TitanofChaos View Post
    6'1"
    at that short, you can pretty much have your pick of any make out there. Ask your LBS to fit you and which bikes have the strongest wheels and drivelines. I'd imagine a CX bike would be ideal for what you need.

  13. #13
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    I was a budget conastrained getting a road bike, I am riding a specialized Allez as a road bike and no isseus as I am 6'4: and 235. You can also look at getting a cross Frame which is similar geometry as a road bike but is generally a bit heaciery to handle off road riding as well as wider tires.

  14. #14
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    road bike for clyde?-27950181_614.jpg

    What do you guys thinks about this design for big guys on road bikes. I'm mostly concerned with the wheelset not constantly having flats than I am with frame flex, but the added cross bar is intriguing. I'm 6'8 275lbs, wanting a road bike at a good price, but only if it holds up to my size.

  15. #15
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    The bike comes with a Shimano 105 drivetrain and Shimano 500 wheelset. I'm totally unfamiliar with road bikes can some one tell me if those parts and wheels will hold up to the stupid amount of abuse I throw at my bikes?

  16. #16
    Lord Thunderbottom
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    anyone have experience with this?

    components look fine except for maybe the hubs

    Pro Level Steel Road Bikes | Commuting | Commuter Bikes | Motobecane Gran Premio PRO

  17. #17
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    I put Big Apple tires and a Nine steel fork on my Jamis Dragon to turn it into a great commuting/touring road bike. Steel is great and the classic Dragon geometry works well on the road.

    I also bought an actual road bike last year for the first time. It's a Raleigh Revinio 4.0. I rode it last year at 250 without any issues at all. I'm 220 now and expect it to be even more fun. I live in Connecticut and hills are everywhere. I've noticed that the weight of the bike makes a bigger difference on the roads than it does on the trails and a road bike in good weather is better than a mountain bike for the pavement.
    He who dares....wins!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham77 View Post
    The bike comes with a Shimano 105 drivetrain and Shimano 500 wheelset. I'm totally unfamiliar with road bikes can some one tell me if those parts and wheels will hold up to the stupid amount of abuse I throw at my bikes?
    Yes, if you maintain them properly. I'll help translate roadie to mountain:
    Dura Ace = XTR
    Ultegra = XT
    105 = SLX
    Tiagra = Deore
    Sora = Alevio
    2300 = Acera

    R500 is the budget wheelset which, like all low end Shimano, is well built but not light or blingy.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by TitanofChaos View Post
    anyone have experience with this?

    components look fine except for maybe the hubs
    I disagree. This is the standard BD trick of hanging a decent derailleur on a generic frame and trying to sell it as some kind of great deal. Except for the 105 parts, everything else is bottom of the barrel. Servicable, but nothing to get excited about. And as for the "high grade steel" frame - Reynolds 520 is just plain old 4130 chromoly. Not bad, just don't be fooled it's something special.

  20. #20
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    In my opinion, the most important aspect of a "Clyde" roadbike is adequate clearance for wide tires. Most frames are plenty strong for clydes, but many can't fit tires wider than 23mm. 23mm tires are for skinny racer boys. Not us. Not if you want your wheels to last. Try to find something that will fit at least 32mm tires. Cross bikes and touring bikes can usually fit wider tires, which is one reason they make great "road" bikes for us big guys. I'm about the same size as the OP and a ride a Surly Cross Check. I find it has a great balance between speed, comfort, and durability.

  21. #21
    R.I.P. DogFriend
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    Priorities for me on a road bike are the frame, wheelset, tires, and brakes.

    I run 23c or 25c tires on my road bike, and since switching to Specialized Armadillo type tires, have had no flats (3 years). The ride a little rougher, but that is a compromise I am willing to live with. I was running on a set of wheels with 20 rear (bladed) spokes and 26 front spokes, but after I found a broken spoke, sold the wheels. I am not comfortable with the thought of a road wheel grenading while descending at 40 mph to 50 mph. When you only have 16 or 20 spokes, breaking one means more than if you have 32 or 36.

    A good quality brakeset (Ultegra or DuraAce) is another place clydes are smart to invest the extra dollars.

  22. #22
    Lord Thunderbottom
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    so basically I'm back to what I was kinda thinking about before this thread

    Salsa Cycles | Bikes | Colossal 2

    "fat" tired steel road bike with disc brakes

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TitanofChaos View Post
    so basically I'm back to what I was kinda thinking about before this thread

    Salsa Cycles | Bikes | Colossal 2

    "fat" tired steel road bike with disc brakes
    That's a great looking bike but it's not cheap. At 250 last year I had no problem on a regular alloy road bike with Ultegra parts. Even the wheels didn't give me an issue. If anything I think that clydes might be harder on mountain bikes than road bikes because of the surface.
    He who dares....wins!

  24. #24
    I Strava Hamburgers
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    Quote Originally Posted by GOTA View Post
    If anything I think that clydes might be harder on mountain bikes than road bikes because of the surface.
    Pretty much this.
    My EBB so loud
    I'm mashing...

  25. #25
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    yes but the wheels are still the weak link on budget road bikes... also with wider tires you can run less PSI and get a lot more comfort out of them 28 is the smallest I would ride on the road...

    the wider tires with a good saddle will give you the comfort to sit and spin which is much easier on the entire bike then standing to mash
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

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