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  1. #1
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    Report on first real ride on the Ibex Atlas Pro.

    My Ibex Atlas Pro arrived earlier this week, I assembled it and took a day off to go give it a spin.

    The assembly itself was relatively easy, turn the stem 180 degrees, install the handle bar, attach the pedals, install the front wheel and pop in the seat post. The one issue I had was that my front wheel was WAY out of true, I'm talking big time wobble. I spent some time to true the wheel and tighten the spokes. Then I came to the dreaded suspension setup which I was very skeptical about since it has an air rear shock and I weigh around 320 pounds. I am pleased to say that I was able to get it setup with 25% sag at 250 psi, we'll see how it holds up over time but its definitely a heck of a lot more Super Clyde friendly than the Enduro SL air shock I tried out. I set the fork to the recommended pressure for my weight and took a lap around my apartment complex parking lot, I felt that it was ready to go.

    The next morning we head out to a local trail, the ride consisted of around 1600 feet of climbing over 9 miles out and back for a total of a 18 miles. Mostly fireroad except for the first and last 2 miles where there is some mildly technical single track. I found that the recommended fork air pressure for my body weight (50% of rider weight was the recommendation) was excessive and felt too stiff. I will need to properly measure the sag and adjust the pressure for the next ride. Coming from a hardtail with an 80mm fork to an AM FS with a 140mm fork up front was giving me some problems with the front wheel lifting up on the steeper portions of the climbs. As far as the rear suspension goes the pedal bob was minimal while seated, but noticeable when standing and hammering hard as would be expected with a single pivot design. The descents were a lot of fun, I was hitting about 28 MPH and the suspension took care of all the roots, rocks and small drops in my way. I found that I would brace myself for the minor impacts that I would worry about on my hardtail and then not even feel them, quite an interesting feeling. I didn't notice any frame flex which I was worried about. I did encountered some brake rubbing in the front that will need to be fixed.

    Overall I would say that I'm happy with the purchase, I wouldn't mind having an adjustable travel fork or more importantly the support of a LBS when it comes to tuning and adjustments but alas this is what you get when you buy a mail order bike. We'll have to see how it does after I put some more miles on it.

  2. #2
    Former Bike Wrench
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    Sounds great, might want to let Ibex know about the front wheel. If it was as out of true as your describing, its strength has been compromised a bit (I've built well over 100 wheels so I'm familiar with what compromises wheel strength). See what you can do...they might send you a new one, I've heard their customer service is pretty good.

    The bike looks pretty sweet otherwise!!!

  3. #3
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    I was actually going to buy a set of 36 spoke wheels.

    I was going to order a set of 36 spoke Revolution wheels from Transition bikes since I tend to destroy 32 spoke wheels way too quickly.

    It was still definitely a bummer that the original wheel was out of true when it arrived.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_mountain_biker
    I was going to order a set of 36 spoke Revolution wheels from Transition bikes since I tend to destroy 32 spoke wheels way too quickly.

    It was still definitely a bummer that the original wheel was out of true when it arrived.
    When I started out I was a lot bigger than you and wheels were never a problem. A lot of it is technique. You know, lift the front over big obstacles instead of bashing straight into them. Unweight the rear when encountering a big rock, ledge, you get my point. I am now at 285lbs before gear and am running Spinergy Xyxlone disc on my Moto-lite and Salsa Delagado's on my 29er with absolutely no issues. So before you drop the coin on a set of wheels do as suggested and see if Ibex will send you a new wheel and then ride them into the ground. Just refine your technique and you will have no problems. I think 36 hole rims are overkill for most people even the super clydes. Just make sure they are properly tensioned and you should be fine. Oh, by the way, congrats on your new steed but you must post pictures of it.
    Last edited by EDDIE JONES; 08-11-2007 at 03:20 PM.

  5. #5
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    Thought I'd give a second report after a month of riding on my Ibex Atlas Pro.

    Within the past month I've seen the trails I've been riding getting progressively more technical and I find that I am more confident on my bike.

    I am very impressed with how well this bike has been taking my 300+ pounds (down to 308 now, will soon be leaving super clyde club )

    I've started to take 1 to 2 foot drops, this bike just soaks up everything. No issues at all with the spots most prone to damage from a heavy rider like wheels, crank/bb and suspension.

    I would whole-heartedly recommend this bike to any heavy riders out there that want a great value on a sweet bike.

    In fact we went riding with another Ibex Atlas Pro owner who has the small size frame and my wife who was riding with us on her Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Comp started having trouble with the more technical sections, she was about to give up but our friend decided to have her try out his Atlas Pro. She was amazed by how much more confidence she had on the Atlas in comparison to her Stumpy. Now she wants to sell her Stumpy and buy an Atlas, a no-name internet bike that is not even pink.

    I just can't recommend this bike enough.



    Edit : Typo
    Last edited by big_mountain_biker; 09-12-2007 at 01:30 PM.

  6. #6
    Fat guy on a bike
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    Now she wants to sell her Stumpy and buy an Atlas, a no-name internet bike that is not even pink.
    I chuckled at the pink part. I had a hard time getting my girl to settle with a light blue bike heh.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDDIE JONES
    I am now at 285lbs before gear and am running Spinergy Xyxlone disc on my Moto-lite and Salsa Delagado's on my 29er with absolutely no issues. So before you drop the coin on a set of wheels do as suggested and see if Ibex will send you a new wheel and then ride them into the ground. Just refine your technique and you will have no problems. I think 36 hole rims are overkill for most people even the super clydes. Just make sure they are properly tensioned and you should be fine.
    You run Delgados? Wow. I am impressed. I would mangle them.

    I noticed an immediate difference in stiffness when I went from 32 to 36h rims (obviously, some of it was the rim and spokes) so I cannot imagine ever running 32h again, unless I drop under 200#. YMMV, of course.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mordy
    I chuckled at the pink part. I had a hard time getting my girl to settle with a light blue bike heh.

    Yeah now she's getting into it though and is more into function than form.
    Although she did have me order her a full set of pink body armor.

    If Ibex would only release another DH\FR bike, she would be all over it. Since that doesn't seem likely for '08 she's probably going to be getting a Versus Blitz II or maybe even another Atlas to go along with her Stumpy which will become a full-time XC bike.

  9. #9
    Fat guy on a bike
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    Look into the Transition Siren, new DH/FR bike for the ladies, coming next year.

  10. #10
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    Pardon me if I missed this, but what size frame did you get, and how tall are you?
    Thanks.
    All's well that ends.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RHEL
    Pardon me if I missed this, but what size frame did you get, and how tall are you?
    Thanks.
    I got their 20.5" frame and I'm 6'2" with a 35" inseam. I felt a bit too stretched out though and ride mostly DH nowadays so I swapped in a 70mm stem to replace the original 130mm stem.

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