Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Flaccid Member
    Reputation: Boyonadyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,888

    Replacement Cassettes for Clydsedales

    Do you do epic uphill rides? How long does your chain last? What about rear cassette? Is there a preferred brand and model that withstands brutal Clydesdale forces on the crank without wearing out or stretching? Is there a model that is Clydesdale Strength?
    "i'll brazilian when YOU do boy, right around the ol' rusty star. Actually, whole fruit bowl. Get on it!" NicoleB

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    363
    1.) I've heard that poor shifting technique will kill a chain long before clyde mass will. Of course, clyde mass makes poor shifting technique even WORSE for chains.

    2.) I've started removing the two smallest cogs from my cassettes and putting spacers inboard of the cassette to make up the difference -- this gets me a perfectly straight chainline when I'm in 22-34. I don't really use the two small cogs offroad anyhow, especially not on a 29er.

    3.) I use regular old SRAM stuff. You could get more expensive chains, but they're usually lighter and shiftier, not significantly stronger.

  3. #3
    Making fat cool since '71
    Reputation: ImaKlyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,829
    As stated, poor shifting is the biggest culprit to destroying cassettes/chains regardless of size. Way more than weight. Of course...when a large dewd puts a load on a cog/chain in a poor way it *is* made worse because of weight (assuming the big boy can really get torque on things) and it's a logarithm regarding force applied btw when talking about folding a cog/shearing pins in cassettes.

    Chains break, 8 and 9 speed chains break pretty easily, period. There are some badass SS chains out there.

    I only run SRAM 990's and XTR/XT cassettes. I *still* fold a cog or two each year. With the 990 and XTR/XT cassettes you can (often, not always) get the cogs back to straight (flat is more accurate, but who cares) if you are careful, patient, and/or skilled.

    You can get 6 or 7 Surly SS cogs onto a standard freehub body stacked next to each other and that works pretty good-ish and is sturdy. You can get Boone Titanium to make you a bunch of cogs...that is a spendy option, trust me. I priced it out, XTR is relatively cheap compared to that.

    Chains? I run good old fashioned 991 or 971 (SRAM), whichever is available.

    Brock...
    Are the wheels roundish? Ride it.

    Disciples Of Dirt, come ride with us.

  4. #4
    Are you gonna eat that?
    Reputation: Kyoseki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    502
    I'm running XTR 970 cranks but a plain old XT cassette, I couldn't justify $200+ for a cassette when I burn through them in about 500 miles.

    I tend to break chains by screwing up long before they wear out, so like Brock I run the SRAM 991/971.
    Due to a lack of interest, tomorrow has been canceled

  5. #5
    Double-metric mtb man
    Reputation: Psycho Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    4,483
    I've had decent luck with Sram 970 cassettes, though XT are my other favorite. Chains, I try to stay a little upper line (951 or 971 SRAM, 53 or 73 Shimano).

    As others have said, how you ride and how you maintain play a big role in how long stuff lasts. I've got 2000+ miles on the driveline of my FS bike and rings and cassette look pretty new still. Chains....well, I killed one, but generally I don't have that big of an issue with them. I try to clean the works on a regular basis and rotate between two chains on a regular basis to cut down on the wear on the driveline....it seems to work wonders.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Hangtime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,280
    991 chain and 980 cassette on one bike and 991 chain and 970 cassette on the other, mid to upper end SRAM stuff works real well. Shifting is all about timing. Plan ahead and shift before you have to stress the drive train and your components will last longer.

  7. #7
    Flaccid Member
    Reputation: Boyonadyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,888
    BeansStink pretty much nailed it on the head, my 11 and 12 tooth sprockets on the cassette just are egged out and not semi circular anymore, strange, since I don't feel I stand on it much in those gears? May have to see a pic of how you shim your cassette for the removal of those two cogs and the straight driveline for 22 34 that you mentioned. Sounds like XT stuff in cassettes is heavy, but strong.
    "i'll brazilian when YOU do boy, right around the ol' rusty star. Actually, whole fruit bowl. Get on it!" NicoleB

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    363

  9. #9
    Flaccid Member
    Reputation: Boyonadyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,888
    Thanks, beanfink. Great pic of it... how hard is it to get those spacers?
    "i'll brazilian when YOU do boy, right around the ol' rusty star. Actually, whole fruit bowl. Get on it!" NicoleB

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    363
    Well, I can think of three ways to get those spacers:

    1.) The spacers that I used on my Karate Monkey are from a Surly Singlespeed conversion kit. That's a pretty expensive way to do it.

    2.) The spacers that I used on my Heckler are from the LBS... the guy working there didn't know where they were, so I just looked around the Track/Singlespeed junkyard until I found them. He charged me $2.00 for six spacers (three 4mm and three 1mm).

    3.) You can buy cassette spacers from JensonUSA, but they seem ridiculously expensive.

    Long story short, they're easy to get.

  11. #11
    livin' large
    Reputation: canadian-clydesdale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    533
    or you could pull apart dead cassettes for spacers
    it tied the room together man!

  12. #12
    Flaccid Member
    Reputation: Boyonadyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,888
    Haven't "killed" any cassettes yet, so currently, that option is out.
    "i'll brazilian when YOU do boy, right around the ol' rusty star. Actually, whole fruit bowl. Get on it!" NicoleB

  13. #13
    livin' large
    Reputation: canadian-clydesdale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    533
    Ask around for blown cassettes, riding buddies or the local bike shops
    it tied the room together man!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    363

    Short Stack Cassette

    I've converted my Heckler and my Karate Monkey to use a "short stack" cassette -- that's a SRAM PG970 with the two small cogs removed, so I can shift the whole cassette outboard.

    (the goal is to get a perfectly straight chainline when I'm in my lowest gear combo, which is 22-34 on the Heckler and 22-32 on the Monkey).

    Both have developed the same problem. I didn't bother to see whether the outboard cog was actually engaging splines on the freehub. It wasn't. It was just sandwiched between a plastic spacer and the lockring. After riding around a bit, the torque causes the pins holding the cogs together to shear off, and then the outermost cog starts slipping. This has happened to two of my cassettes so far.

    So tonight I just took off another cog and put a few more millimeters of spacers on my hub. I've got 16-34 on the Heckler -- a 6 out of 9 cassette. I made sure that the 16t cog was actually engaging the freehub body, and put a 2.5mm spacer between it and the lockring to eliminate any chance of slop.

  15. #15
    Bat Fastardson
    Reputation: RHEL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    73
    Stupid question: Instead of removing the small cogs and looking for spacers, can you not yank them and put them on the inboard end of the stack? Funky looking, but perfect spacing made easy.
    If I'm using tumor logic, please excuse me.
    All's well that ends.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    363

    Speaking of Tumor Logic

    It dawned on me that maybe my chainline isn't the problem... maybe it's that I'm a 300lb guy riding a 37lb bike with a HAWG full of water, and I have an XT rear hub. What's in there? Two pawls?

    Maybe if I can get my next rear hub (King ISO Heavy Duty or DT Swiss 440 w/replacement steel cassette body) to skip, I'll start messing with the cogs again.

  17. #17
    Making fat cool since '71
    Reputation: ImaKlyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,829
    Quote Originally Posted by beanfink
    It dawned on me that maybe my chainline isn't the problem... maybe it's that I'm a 300lb guy riding a 37lb bike with a HAWG full of water, and I have an XT rear hub. What's in there? Two pawls?

    Maybe if I can get my next rear hub (King ISO Heavy Duty or DT Swiss 440 w/replacement steel cassette body) to skip, I'll start messing with the cogs again.
    Shitemano hubs blow for us. I've not blown a hub (plenty of cassettes tho...) since going to King and Hope hubs on my bikes. Both rock. Like you mentioned you would get, we do need the stainless freehub body with Kings. My original Al version only lasted a couple months.

    Brock...
    Are the wheels roundish? Ride it.

    Disciples Of Dirt, come ride with us.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •