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  1. #1
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    Quick Clyde / Roadbike Question

    Hi All,

    I'm looking to do some light roadbiking when I can't get out on the trails.

    I'm 6'5 and 270 lbs. and am looking at paying $225 (lightly used off craigslist) for the steel roadie BD bike linked below in a 61 cm size.

    Understand that the components are low end and won't last forever, but this might be a good way for me to break into a road ride now and again with a very low budget.

    Also sure the steel might be a bit heavier and thus slower, but a steel frame might suit somebody of my size okay right?

    What do you all think?

    Road Bikes - Motobecane Mirage

  2. #2
    Ridin' Furry
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    That should do just fine as a entry level road bike. As long as you can pedal and it rolls weight wont really matter, unless you like climbing a lot. You can always upgrade to something better if you decide you like road biking.

  3. #3
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    Thanks. The dude flaked out of the deal shortly afterwards. Sucks for me, gotta keep looking.

  4. #4
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    Well since he flaked, I found this one on bikeisland.com for only a few dollars more. BikeIsland.com - Bicycle Parts, Accessories and Clothing at Affordable Prices with Free Shipping

  5. #5
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    Any material road bike will work for you, really. A handful of things to keep in mind, though, is certain weight ratings. For instance, you may have to get a different saddle, as some are rated to 175lbs, and they do break. Why do they put 175lbs saddles on 61cm frames? Who knows. Also wheels. I had a carbon Roubaix (great bike) but it came with wheels that kept blowing out spokes, and it was not due to my killer strength. Alex wheels I believe? So I replaced them with a set of DT Swiss RR 1850's, which are deep v wheels, and never had a problem.

    Happy hunting. Road biking is a fun change of pace from mountain biking, and makes you a better mountain biker too.
    “Think of bicycles as rideable art that can just about save the world.”
-Grant Petersen

  6. #6
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    You'll be fine on an Al frame. I ride one and I'm heavier than you. I've ridden my current bike as heavy as 320 pounds.

  7. #7
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    any material is fine. The thing that would concern me about the bikeIsland bike is the largest size is 58.5 and they don't publish a geometry chart.
    at 6'5... I'd be surprised if the biggest size is big enough, and I'd never buy a bike without looking at a geometry chart.

  8. #8
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    Something to keep in mind, you don't want to buy any ultra light racer frames. In your price range that probably won't be an issue. With our weight and power though, some of the lightest frames will feel like noodles, and literally flex as you peddle. I had an aluminum and carbon frame that would shift perfect in the stand, but miss shift continuously when I ride it, and it literally was because the frame twisted when I really cranked hard.

    Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 4 Beta
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    This is your life and it's ending one minute at a time.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    any material is fine. The thing that would concern me about the bikeIsland bike is the largest size is 58.5 and they don't publish a geometry chart.
    at 6'5... I'd be surprised if the biggest size is big enough, and I'd never buy a bike without looking at a geometry chart.
    Thanks for all comments. For what it's worth, the bikeisland one that I ordered is the identical bike to the one linked below which did have a geometry. I understand that road bike sizing is important, even more so than mtn bike sizing, so I am without a doubt taking a chance.

    Based on their sizing chart, the way they measure, the 58.5 is closer to a more traditionally sized 60-61 cm road bike, so that's why I felt fairly confident in the size and made the order. Would you agree looking at the geometry chart that this should be, at the very least a close fit?

    I'm not sure I can spring for a professional fitting at this point and hope to try and fit myself with guides online. Well see how it goes.

    Save up to 60% off new Road Bikes - Gravity Avenue B | Save up to 60% off new road bikes
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  10. #10
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    yup bikes direct has gotten much better about having a complete geomotry chart for bikes... but sometimes it can be a bit of work to find it...

    that bike is a "compact" frame and while most other companies are using they use the traditional measurement... example a specilized secture 64cm really has a 57.5cm seat tube
    - Surly Disc trucker
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  11. #11
    Always Learning
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZmyDust View Post
    Thanks for all comments. For what it's worth, the bikeisland one that I ordered is the identical bike to the one linked below which did have a geometry. I understand that road bike sizing is important, even more so than mtn bike sizing, so I am without a doubt taking a chance.

    Based on their sizing chart, the way they measure, the 58.5 is closer to a more traditionally sized 60-61 cm road bike, so that's why I felt fairly confident in the size and made the order. Would you agree looking at the geometry chart that this should be, at the very least a close fit?

    I'm not sure I can spring for a professional fitting at this point and hope to try and fit myself with guides online. Well see how it goes.

    Save up to 60% off new Road Bikes - Gravity Avenue B | Save up to 60% off new road bikes
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    Chances are, it will be a bit too small for you, but you can make it work depending on your preferences.

    Quick start sizing guide for 6'3" - 6'7". Your sweet spot starting frame size for a road bike would be a larger frame than you indicated.

    TallMan'sRoadBikeSize

    Other charts...

    http://www.*****sportinggoods.com/gr...oad_Sizing.jpg

    http://www.giant-road-bike.com/img/s...RChart2006.jpg

    There is a very good thread here about road bikes for your size. (I'm 6'4" and ride the 64cm Specialized Roubaix). It's a good thread worth reading as a lot of 6'3" - 6'5" guys have posted on that thread and shared what they went through to get a proper fitting road bike.

    The longer headtubes of the larger sizes help get the bars up where they need to be for a tall man. In addition, as the frames get larger, the stability and stiffness of the frame improves as the better bike companies build the head tube and fork differently for the larger sizes. A 58cm frame may weeble and wobble all over for you as your seat height will be way up there and a bit of the "ass in the air hands way down there" fit will be the result. Although, the adjustable stem might help mitigate some of that.

    Leonard Zinn (Zinn Cycles) is the expert on bikes for tall guys. Visit his site and read everything he has written. A good priced entry level big and tall man's road bike was developed between Zinn and KHS bikes (KHS Flite 747). It sells for around $1700 and would fit you stock out of the box. The steel frame is beefy enough to support your weight and the components/wheels are targeted for the big/tall crowd.

    KHS-Flite-747

    See how tall that head tube is which helps get the bars up? The headtube length on the KHS Flite 747 is 248mm compared to the one you ordered which has only 225mm. So that's about an inch lower. Hopefully, the one ordered has left some steerer tube and spacers for you to play with to adjust the height (along with the adjustable stem). Having been through the process of getting a good fitting road bike recently, I can attest to now uncomfortable it is - at least at my age and level of flexibility - to ride with the "ass in the air and hands way down there" pro fit.

    Here's a 64cm bike that I ride. Fits like a glove out of the box for me at 6'4" and Specialized left plenty of steerer tube and spacers for me to work with (and I can flip the stem positive if I want a taller handlebar for more recreational riding).

    2013Roubaix64cm

    I'm able to use tall three hand positions - the flats, hoods, and drops - for the first time in my life due to correct fit. I was on a 58cm Specialized Allez before this which the salesman at the time figured would fit me just fine back in 2006. Now I know better...

    See how the one you ordered fits and if you like road biking, your next purchase should allow you to target a frame truly designed for a tall man such as yourself.

    BB

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the Reply Bruce. I'll definitely keep those bikes in mind for the future when / if I ever can spare the funds to update the roadbike.

    As far as the sizing guys, as we spoke about above, even tho the bike is advertised as a 58.5 cm, I believe it is measured a bit different than today's standard, because even BD's site says that its closer a traditional 61-62cm.

    Either way, I got the bike yesterday, put it together, and have been on a few 8 or so mile rides. I do feel that "up in the air, bars down there" thing going on, but I'm making small adjustments to the adjustable stem until it feels better. I put it up to 20degrees after my ride tonight and will test that tomorrow. I believe I can be comfortable on this bike.

    The downtube shifters are indexed, which I didn't expect. The RD needed some slight adjustment but it shifts fine for a $250 bike.

    Pinched a tube on the first ride, so I inflated the tires closer to 100psi even tho the recommended max is 80, I think I need more than that with my weight. Worked well tonight.

    This bike comes with Kenda K152 tires, which are reviewed horribly online and very cheap. Any recommendations for good tires that I can inflate to match my weight?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZmyDust View Post
    Thanks for the Reply Bruce. I'll definitely keep those bikes in mind for the future when / if I ever can spare the funds to update the roadbike.

    As far as the sizing guys, as we spoke about above, even tho the bike is advertised as a 58.5 cm, I believe it is measured a bit different than today's standard, because even BD's site says that its closer a traditional 61-62cm.
    Who knows what "BD" means by that, or if it is really 100% accurate. Hopefully it is and the bike will fit more like a 62cm frame (you'd probably be fine on a 63-66cm "traditional" frame at your height in terms of getting the front bars up).

    Quote Originally Posted by ZmyDust View Post
    Either way, I got the bike yesterday, put it together, and have been on a few 8 or so mile rides. I do feel that "up in the air, bars down there" thing going on, but I'm making small adjustments to the adjustable stem until it feels better. I put it up to 20degrees after my ride tonight and will test that tomorrow. I believe I can be comfortable on this bike.
    I hope so. The backside up there and bars down there is what I feared when you were making the decision to go with that bike. It's what keeps a lot of people from riding these days unless they are very flexible and can do it pain free. Neck pain, back pain, numb hands all are associated with being too out of position. The body can adjust, so given time you might be alright.

    Post up pictures of the new bike and how you have it adjusted. Even better with a profile shot of you sitting on it.

  14. #14
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    Who knows what "BD" means by that, or if it is really 100% accurate. Hopefully it is and the bike will fit more like a 62cm frame (you'd probably be fine on a 63-66cm "traditional" frame at your height in terms of getting the front bars up).

    what BD means is that it's measured in actual size... not the fake "traditional" size like most others measure (including your specilized which if it was accurately measured would be a 60cm and not a 64cm... but specilized has stuck with the "effective traditional size" as their measurment)

    even the KHS 747 uses compact geometry and while it's listed as a 65cm its seat tube only measures in at 57cm

    I wish more companies would use the Frame reach and frame stack measurements... that tells far more about the fit of a bike than the "frame size" ever does :-/

    unfortuantly pros are very flexable guys and want the most speed... which puts the head tube short and the bars low :-/... i'm thankful companies have realized that most riders are not pros... but it takes some work to figure that out and understand it from a geometry chart
    - Surly Disc trucker
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by donalson View Post
    what BD means is that it's measured in actual size... not the fake "traditional" size like most others measure (including your specilized which if it was accurately measured would be a 60cm and not a 64cm... but specilized has stuck with the "effective traditional size" as their measurment)

    even the KHS 747 uses compact geometry and while it's listed as a 65cm its seat tube only measures in at 57cm

    I wish more companies would use the Frame reach and frame stack measurements... that tells far more about the fit of a bike than the "frame size" ever does :-/

    unfortuantly pros are very flexable guys and want the most speed... which puts the head tube short and the bars low :-/... i'm thankful companies have realized that most riders are not pros... but it takes some work to figure that out and understand it from a geometry chart
    Yes, thanks for clarifying that. Whether it is Specialized, Trek, Cannondale, or many others - the actual seat tube measurement is not what they call the frame size. I know Giant bucks the trend and sizes their bikes based on the actual seat tube length measurement. I'm sure there are others including the OP's choice. Should we be surprised the bike industry can cause confusion at times?

    In spite of Specialized calling the Roubaix that I bought a 64cm frame, the geometry chart showed the seat tube measurement as being 60cm which was the closest match to what the Zinn fit calculator said I needed when I plugged in my measurements. That calculator claimed I would need an actual 597mm seat tube if using a bike that came with stock cranks. The top tube measurement was spot on and the head tube measurement was very edifying - especially after I had the chance to sit on the next size smaller (Specialized's 61cm) and felt how it was too small for me.

    The Flite 747 has a much higher BB to make room for the 200mm cranks it comes with, so the 57cm seat tube measurement is hard to compare in an apples to apples view with other stock size huge frames that come with a lower BB (and hence longer seat tube measurement). But your point is made with their sizing label of 65cm (and the XXL) nomer.

    Studying the geometry chart of the OP's bike, I saw the measurements were similar to the Specialized version of what they call a 61cm frame in the Roubaix (a bike I found too small for me at 6'4"), except the head tube is shorter on the Gravity Avenue B and more "race" oriented in terms of saddle to bar drop. I guess my posts were "concerned" with the fit for the OP's height based on that. Not a deal breaker, but certainly caught my eye.

    I still think the Flite 747 for big drinks of water (guys over 200 pounds and 6'4" and above) is about as good of a Clyde road bike deal as one is going to find for the price. Purpose built for tall and heavy. Sounds Clyde worthy.

  16. #16
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    spot on post... I wish more companies would list the frame stack and reach info... it says MUCH more than all the other numbers as far as fit does... a setback/set forward seatpost can take care of the minor differences between frames to get proper KOPs but nothing you can do can change the stack or reach numbers.
    Quick Clyde / Roadbike Question-geofit-1-43f05c16-2f23-4f62-8e40-58bec7cc74de-0-630x320.jpg

    you're right on the 747... I forget its an extra 3cm of crank length (which is why it has such little BB drop)... if i had 1600$ i'd get one
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  17. #17
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    Hi All... you all have offered some great information and its much appreciated. Again the point of this bike was to spend a small $250 bucks to see if I'd even be up for road riding. So far so good, but its only been a week.

    So on to the bike with regards to fit.. I followed the the advice given in this video (YouTube), and set the seat and forward/back of the seat as outlined. The third step (sight the handlebars with regards to the hub), I'm still working on. When I'm in the drops, and I look down, the bars are well in front of the hub, even at a 20degrees rise on the stem. I'm going to try to bring it up to 30 degrees. At least using that video as a guide, this means I should have a shorter stem.

    As far as feel goes, I do feel *slightly* stretched out when I'm on the brake hoods. Very slightly though, and it just could be getting used to the new riding style and I've done 60+ miles with the only soreness being slight lower backpain at about the 10 mile mark of a ride. Somebody asked above for a pic of me and the bike, so here you go. I know its not much, this an autotimer on my phone and I don't really have a way to show you a pic of me on it at the moment. I will get that out here eventually.

    Thanks again for all your help.

    Last edited by ZmyDust; 06-07-2013 at 11:12 PM.

  18. #18
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    good that you're enjoying it... the more I ride road the more I grow to like it... i'm looking forward to getting a real drop bar bike... I had a trek 400 road bike some years back and really liked it (fit me very well) but I had to sell it :-/... the biggest thing I didn't like was the downtube shifters (like you've got) they are just so low and akward to use on big frames... for small frames I can see them being ok... I put bar end shifters on it and loved the bike... you might consider the same if you end up sticking to the road bike
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  19. #19
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    Yes I agree the downtube shifters are a bit awkward. I live in the flattest environment imaginable so its not so bad, I could see it being frustrating when hitting a big hill and struggling to get up it, then having to reach down.

    So as promised, heres another try at a self timed shot of me on the bike. Note that Im holding the work bench with my left hand so I'm not quite leaning forward as much as I normally would when rolling. Also I wasn't clipped in, so my feet are probably an inch further forward than they would be when clipped.

    After taking this shot, I adjusted the stem angle from 20 to 30 degrees, turned the drops towards me slightly, then and went on a short ride. I feel much comfortable riding on the hoods with this.

    Any feedback welcome about the fit. After looking at this pic, I look comical on such a skinny bike after riding fat tires, and I'm going to assume you all stick to this bike is too small for me? Any changes recommended to make the best of what I have? Remember I'm a noob in the roadie world and you all are very knowledgeable.

    (Oh and yes the front tire is flat.. was fine for my ride last night, but flat by the time I went out there tonight. Ordered some gatorskins today, thats my second flat, both tubes had one very small hole in them)

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZmyDust View Post
    Hi All... you all have offered some great information and its much appreciated. Again the point of this bike was to spend a small $250 bucks to see if I'd even be up for road riding. So far so good, but its only been a week.

    So on to the bike with regards to fit.. I followed the the advice given in this video (YouTube), and set the seat and forward/back of the seat as outlined. The third step (sight the handlebars with regards to the hub), I'm still working on. When I'm in the drops, and I look down, the bars are well in front of the hub, even at a 20degrees rise on the stem.
    I'd forget that YouTube advice about alignment of the bars with the front hub. That's some archaic mumbo-jumbo very rough "in the ball park" thing that certainly does not have to be adhered to for a good fit on a road bike or a mountain bike.

    The important thing is you are out there riding and your price entry point did not, as you said, break the bank. That adjustable stem seems to offer various positions for you as you get used to the bike. Nothing wrong with being in the hoods as your favorite position. I think that's typical for most of us on road bikes. I actually really love to ride in the drops. It's just I can't see much more than the 10 - 20 feet in front of me if I have too much saddle to bar drop, so I keep my bars higher (about even with the saddle) so I can ride in the drops more - especially on the paved bike trails where I don't have to worry so much about watching where I am going.

    Your body will adapt rather quickly, but don't be afraid to tweak the bar placement as you adjust. If you feel neck pain, don't be afraid to raise the bars a bit untili it goes away. Then you can slowly drop the bars to allow for your neck to adjust. The same principles apply on the bike as for our upright walking posture. For every inch our head is forward, the head weighs a lot more. And neck muscles being as weak as they are, continued work on your core and slowly adjusting to how far forward you lean on the bike gets adjusted. The longer the ride, the more you will feel it. So take your time and start "high" to keep that neck healthy and in a good mood.

    Weight on the head...

  21. #21
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    I'd forget that YouTube advice about alignment of the bars with the front hub. That's some archaic mumbo-jumbo very rough "in the ball park" thing that certainly does not have to be adhered to for a good fit on a road bike or a mountain bike.
    the angle of the bars thing is more of a non ergo bar thing from what i've read... I still place mine slightly downward (although pointing at the rear brake is supposed to be a more accurate term than to the hub)... on more traditional style drop bars it puts the drops at a more ergo position but more importantly makes the rams to the hood flatter and raises the hoods up slightly.

    as for sitting position the typical "fitting position" should be in the hoods... if you can't ride comfortably in the hoods than the fit isn't right...

    bars are also something that makes a road bike more difficult to fit properly... on a MTB we have a few bar rise options with a few degree of sweep options... on road you get the stem, then you get all sort of bar options that can vary several CM for reach to the hoods and another CM or so for how much to the drops
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  22. #22
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    Thanks all. After putting the stem to a 30 degree rise, I took a 20 mile ride the following day and felt great during and afterward (aside from the sunburn!)

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