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  1. #1
    texas proud!
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    question to Hoss owners

    OK ,

    Im getting ready to buy the hoss deelux however i heard a lot of bad things about the fork and wheels.

    would it be better to buy a frame and build from there.

    or is the delux componets good enough?



    im not going to be doing any serious jumps or anything crazy mostly urban and some light trails.

    im 6'0 ft. 300 just wanna make sure i get the most for my money.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by relate27
    Im getting ready to buy the hoss deelux however i heard a lot of bad things about the fork and wheels...im not going to be doing any serious jumps or anything crazy mostly urban and some light trails.
    They're not bad, just not the best. The fork should be just fine for urban (it's a DJ fork) and light trail usage. It's not super plush and has limited adjustability, but it'll probably hold up just fine.

    I had a problem with lateral on the front wheel of my Hoss (standard, not Deluxe: different rims, otherwise wheels are the same) but a higher spoke tension took care of that.


    Quote Originally Posted by relate27
    would it be better to buy a frame and build from there.
    Better, yes, you could put whatever components you want on it. But most likely more expensive.


    Quote Originally Posted by relate27
    or is the delux componets good enough?
    They're good enough, absolutely.


    Quote Originally Posted by relate27
    im 6'0 ft. 300 just wanna make sure i get the most for my money.
    I'm 5'11", 260lbs, and IMO the Hoss is a great value. I dare say it's the best off the shelf hardtail for clydesdales in any price range.

    Patrick

  3. #3
    SASQUATCH!
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    Howdy Relate,

    I'm 6'5", 220lbs give-or-take. Rode my Hoss Deluxe (2005) really hard last season before getting a full suspension bike.

    Nothing wrong with the fork from a durability point of view, in my opinion; it can take a beating. That said, it's not the most supple fork either. It's a dirt jump fork. If you want a plush, sensitive and adjustable fork, look elsewhere. I'm not saying it's bad, just not great. Seemed strong enough tho.

    Can't say I'm overly happy with the wheels. They held up for the season---barely. I was popping spokes like mad near the end. Can't tell if this was due to a bad build or just my sloppy riding, but I can say that I've never been happy with any 32spoke wheels I've had (and I've had a lot). Big guys should always go with 36h imho, unless you can find a really *good* wheelbuilder.

    I'm also not a believer in the ISIS type bottom bracket for large guys, especially if you can really torque on the cranks. I found myself having to tighten them down almost every ride until one day they wouldn't stay tight: I had stripped some of the splines at some point. For a clyde bike it's a weak component choice (again, just my opinion).

    After saying all of that I must also say that I really kicked the crap out of that bike and it help up pretty damn well considering---lesser bikes would have folded.
    I would still buy the complete stock bike and ride it till you find a problem, then upgrade accordingly. It'll likely be cheaper in the long run and you'll be fixing real problems instead of imagined ones .

  4. #4
    Your bike is incorrigible
    Reputation: Guyechka's Avatar
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    building one up

    I built mine up from the deelux frame. Total cost was somewhere around $1300. Was it any better? No. It would actually be less expensive to buy the bike complete, ride it for a season, then decide to switch out the forks or wheelset. If the fork is the major drawback, you can always find one of last year's forks (or from the year before) that are half the price they originally were and are better than the stock fork.

  5. #5
    texas proud!
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    Cool guys,

    Thanks for the replys.Definately helped me in making my decision.Just gonna but the delux and replace parts as needed in the future.

  6. #6
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    I have had the first Kona Hoss (Base Line you can call it)

    Problem I have had was the rear Hayes failed out - I installed Avid's Mechanical's.

    Blew the rear derailleur hangar - replaced it and installed a Shimano XT rear derailleur in-place of the Deore model.

    I changed out the crank for Shimano XT; however, I am on the second XT non-drive side crank arm, trashed the threads area.

    The Alex 24's are okay; however, I have a sickness for Sun Rhyno Lite and Mammoth Rims.

  7. #7
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    Good luck with the Hoss. It's a nice bike. I've made comments on the wheels and fork. The stock wheels on my bike were borderline. I had to replace them earlier this year after about 1300 miles. I was tired of replacing spokes then retruing wheels that had poor spoke tension to begin with. I just now replaced the fork. The old one didn't break... it's just not a great trail fork. It's sturdy and is not flexy. It's just heavy and has no adjustability beyond preload.

  8. #8
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    Hoss

    I wish the MX Comp was heavy; it bottoms out. I am torn between a Fox and Rockshox model's.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigcountry02
    I wish the MX Comp was heavy; it bottoms out. I am torn between a Fox and Rockshox model's.

    Which models?

    When I was looking to replace the 4" travel fork on my Hoss I checked out the Fox lineup. And I quickly dismissed them because:

    • even though they have 32mm stanchions...
    • ...all the 4" travel forks are XC oriented
    • they are pretty expensive
    • the one coil option (the Vanilla) is 130mm travel, and not adjustable. While the Hoss could probably handle it, and some have done it, IMO the handling would probably have been greatly altered.


    I found a 2005 Reba SL for pretty cheap, it has 32mm stanchions, it's 2lbs lighter than the Marz that I pulled off my Hoss (and I lost it all off the front end), it's way plusher, etc. I do hesitate to really bash on it in fear of blowing an air seal, but that may be paranioa on my part. Or maybe not?

    Patrick
    Last edited by PCinSC; 06-03-2006 at 08:50 PM.

  10. #10
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    When I had my Hoss-D it would have been much cheaper in the long run to do a build up rather than swaping parts. Before I sold it; nothing on my bike was stock. Wheels and fork went first, drivetrain second, seatpost and stem..you get the point. The bike stock is a good starting point but as the miles added up better parts at a higher price point served me better

    My advice...do a build of your own

  11. #11
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    I am still looking; torn between Rockskox Reba, Revelation and Fox Vanilla forks.

    Rich

    Quote Originally Posted by PCinSC
    Which models?

    When I was looking to replace the 4" travel fork on my Hoss I checked out the Fox lineup. And I quickly dismissed them because:

    • even though they have 32mm stanchions...
    • ...all the 4" travel forks are XC oriented
    • they are pretty expensive
    • the one coil option (the Vanilla) is 130mm travel, and not adjustable. While the Hoss could probably handle it, and some have done it, IMO the handling would probably have been greatly altered.


    I found a 2005 Reba SL for pretty cheap, it has 32mm stanchions, it's 2lbs lighter than the Marz that I pulled off my Hoss (and I lost it all off the front end), it's way plusher, etc. I do hesitate to really bash on it in fear of blowing an air seal, but that may be paranioa on my part. Or maybe not?

    Patrick
    Last edited by Bigcountry02; 06-09-2006 at 05:52 PM.

  12. #12
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    You know the Show - Extreme Makeover! Well, I do not get rid or part the Kona it will get an extreme makeover. I will have to examine in full detail on the makeover.

    Rich

    Quote Originally Posted by saba
    When I had my Hoss-D it would have been much cheaper in the long run to do a build up rather than swaping parts. Before I sold it; nothing on my bike was stock. Wheels and fork went first, drivetrain second, seatpost and stem..you get the point. The bike stock is a good starting point but as the miles added up better parts at a higher price point served me better

    My advice...do a build of your own

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigcountry02
    I am still looking; torn between Rockskox Reba, Revelation and Fox Vanilla forks.
    Well, IMO an all-air Reba and all-air Revelation are going to be pretty similar (in feel and performance) except that the 130mm travel will slack out the head tube of the Hoss, which was designed for a 4" fork. Unless you get the U-turn version Revelation, then you can dial the travel down and put it where ever you want. Potentially (or in my mind at least) the Vanilla is a little beefier, but I would check that there is a coil spring available for someone your weight before you purchase.

    If you contemplating the Revelation, why not just go all out a get a Pike? Although you'd have to get a new hub and rebuild the front wheel.

    Personally, I don't think I'd want to put a 5" travel fork on the Hoss. First, it'll slacken the head angle (did I already mention that? ). Plus it'll raise the bottom bracket. On my Hoss, with WTB Motoraptor 2.4 tires front and rear, the BB is pretty high (13.5"+), especially for a hardtail XC mtb. It's great for clearing obstacles (I now have a bashguard instead of a big chainring, so that even adds additional clearance, but doesn't affect the BB height) and I definitely feel that I'm sitting up very high on top of the bike. This can be a desirable or undesirable feeling, depending on personal preferance and/or what type of riding your doing. Just something to consider when pondering changing the fork travel on your bike. Maybe others with this type of setup will chime in with their thoughts (or you can do a search).

    Patrick

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