View Poll Results: What do Clydes Need Most for MTB?

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  • Clyde specific spec'ed mountain bikes

    10 14.93%
  • Websites, blogs, magazines, social networks, etc.

    1 1.49%
  • Clyde specific components

    9 13.43%
  • Clyde sized MTB clothing

    20 29.85%
  • Events, Clyde Only Races, Festivals, etc.

    3 4.48%
  • Clyde specific gear reviews

    18 26.87%
  • Training/weight loss/nutrition/fitness programs for Clyde athletes

    6 8.96%
Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
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    Poll: What kind of Clyde resources most needed?

    Ok, just curious, but have thought for a while about what was lacking most for the (real) Clydesdale market. What do you think is the biggest (pun intended) need in the Clyde community, mountain biking or other...

  2. #2
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    I don't think that it matters what is lacking, because us clydes are such a tiny percent of the market that it would be difficult to cater to us.

  3. #3
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    good idea here. Going to hit points of the poll. But I voted more component availability though be nice to see races have a clyde sub class like they have age groups and such. 30yr age group against guys that are 175lbs on hilly terrain is kinda a bad gap. Clyde classes would bring more into the sport because they will see a place for them, thus side effect of healthier and happier clydes. but ppl think over 200lbs is clyde status, not imo, not at my height.

    Catering, if you actually look around, clyde market is growing both in number of riders and things available.

    Examples: Manitou (choice for new fork after 10s of hours of research) Tower Pro. They offer internals to support clydes while giving a smoother ride than most near that price point. Plus easy to come by.
    Bontrager and others, my 270lb, 6'2 butt hasnt had an issue getting gear in my size except just in some cases having to go a size up cause manufacturers are FREAKING STUPID! Cant use the standard sizing correctly, cause large from one place will be 2 xl at another. Hence why I mentioned bontrager first, so far only company I can simply use my normal clothing size to buy correct size gear. Many others I have to go next size up sometimes 2 sizes (at which point biggest size they offer).

    Speced bikes, they are already rated for ~300lbs so making bikes for us, at least bigger companies, dont see it happening and not a problem really. Maybe more of offering a discount for clyde friendly forks or allowing us to choose "firmer" (when applicable) fork or shock internals at no cost when new bike is purchased.

    As for the rest, comes with the races/events. Clydes need to stand up and be recognized cause their are way more of us than we realize, just many are afraid of ridicule being out riding at our size. I was fortunate, local club (which Im now honored to be a member of) has shown unmatchable support to myself, other clydes and anyone who wants to ride.

    Cycling overall has created an "elitest" image of best bikes, best physical shape ppl. Just like the whole mtb cause for getting trail access etc, getting the word out that being big doesnt mean you cant ride the trails and have fun making new friends.

    All of the above are needed, but biggest of all is letting it be known clydes are welcome here and there is a place for us as it comes down to the one thing above all, getting out and riding.
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  4. #4
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    clyde-sized frames.

    To me that's the only thing that's really lacking in the market. It's amazing to me how just about every brand has frames to fit people shorter than 99% of the population (i.e., women-specific) but many don't have frames to fit people over 6'; which are a similar percentage of the population, and more likely to ride mtbs.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the feedback you guys. Tigris, awesome post. I was just thinking out loud about looking for a clyde-related side project, whether it is an event, website, etc. I always thought it would be cool to do all the research on all the components, and put together build kits and frames that are specially selected for durability and best handling with more weight. Then you could just order a "Clyde Bronson" or something from a website with a fork, wheelset, brakes, etc. designed for big boys.

    I totally agree with the elitist statements. I was and at times still am a little intimidated going into the bike shop with my broken chain in front of all the 120 lb spandex crew. In reality, everyone is pretty cool, but still...

    I think it would be cool to have an event or something for Clyde riders, or even other outdoor athletes. Maybe a race or fun ride(s). I definitely agree with Tigris about sub-categories. If there was a Clyde only race with either age categories, or heftiness rankings or both, I would be more inclined to do a ride or a race, instead of racing against a 6'4 201 lb guy with washboard abs in the Clydesdale race category. I would also love to do an event with a Clyde tri that involved riding and a pie eating contest or something!

    Anyways, please keep the feedback coming, I'd like to come up with some kind of Clyde-related hobby project. Maybe a gear review You Tube Channel or something would be a good start.

    There are probably enough of us spread out there that are more than dabblers in the sport that could use better resources, products, events, or social networks.

  6. #6
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    The biggest benefit to "the Clyde market" is with frame fitment. I am amazed how manufactures can use the same rear triangle on a xs and xxl frame. Or how a XL and XXL have the same front center and just change head tube/seat tube angles to get the longer top tube length. I've even seen where changing the bottom bracket height to effect reach was the only difference between a "M" and a "L".
    It's clear that not much effort is being put into frame fitment for Clydes from the manufactures. I've been told "XXL is a small piece of the pie of sales so why put much effort into it"
    In reality I believe with properly fitting bikes more Clydes would stay in the sport after dipping their toes in it.

  7. #7
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    My vote is what it really needs is fewer Clyde's. Training and nutrition follow as second choice.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the feedback, y'all.

  9. #9
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    This is a problem in all outdoor sports equipment

    Quote Originally Posted by AZ View Post
    My vote is what it really needs is fewer Clyde's. Training and nutrition follow as second choice.
    I think he is partly on the right track.

    In my experience I have been between an xl and a xxl most of my life. Yes I am fat, yes I am working on loosing weight. but I am under no delusions that I will ever be able to fit int a L tee shirt (haven't since I was 11) I will always need to find xlt dress shirts my arms are just too damn long). My weight loss goal is size 36 pants (seems like a much more logical destination that some #, but I won't stop once I hit that number)

    Finding a jacket that has room for my shoulders and/or sleeves that fit has been a life long challenge.

    I have to buy shoes wide enough for my fees length isn't my issue.

    I am and always will be a stout guy.

    and I LOVE BEING OUTSIDE!

    This is where the catch 22 lies, Most people who go outside are average or smaller, and If you are a big person you are just less likely to dick about in the great outdoors. If you are a big person docking about doors you will eventually slim down and fit in like everyone else. For the most part that is true.

    However it isn't completely attainable for many of us.
    We North Americans are both blessed with and cursed by our vast great outdoors. What I mean is since Eisenhower cities became bloated and sprawled (just like its inhabitants). Commutes increased from 10m on foot to 10m by car then to 30m by car. Which means the 8hr work day has become an in defacto 9hr day when travel is factored. After that who has time or the drive to eat right, cook healthy, or go out and do stuff.

    I also see tons of clydes, riding big box bikes, Who wouldn't know what mtb pants looked like if they were wearing them

    But yeah Frames, wheels and clothing that are made for mega people. FOR THE LOVE OF GOD BIGGER HELMETS!
    Last edited by Clyde on Wheels; 12-19-2013 at 06:56 PM. Reason: new small thought

  10. #10
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    do what i do, walk into the shop in clyde sized spandex lol. bugger the others. I might weigh between 125 and 130 kg and be a little tubby, but as long as i am able to ride i don't really care.
    my bugbear is farking clothing. so far the only companies that do my size clothing 3-4xl are all in the states. so i have to purchase online. lo and behold i go into an lbs and look. largest most times is 2xl. or a 3xl for munchkins. kinda sux that way

  11. #11
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    Clyde on wheels hit a home run ....catch 22 lives in outside sports for clydes!!! Im built like a baby shaq 6'5.5 325lbs (semi athletic build...lol ) i tend to have issues on clothes ,shoes,& fit(on bike), wheels...i will say part of it is my inexperience on some issues (bike parts) but the clothes absolutely horrific.....especially when you drool over the fashionable designs of such companies like tld,evoc, teva,five ten, fly racing,etc (im not into the spandex style) .it really kinda baffles me cause all these said companies are also on the forums,so im sure they see the class growing but dont really care......?!? Imo the first company to cater or address the cylde class i think will dominate that particilar crowd! Just my lil 2 cents
    Ride hard everytime....or take up hiking...........lol

  12. #12
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    wide shoes. clothing.
    I was gonna stop by and see you, but the Jehovas witnesses came by. When they left I started drinking. Voicemail from Paul

  13. #13
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    My thoughts.



    Clyde specific spec'ed mountain bikes

    -that gets my vote. There's not really anything available off the shelf that's super appropriate for a 230+ pound rider. A decent clyde will end up replacing a lot of bike parts. Frames are the worst; always a bad shock tune and flexy and delicate.


    Websites, blogs, magazines, social networks, etc.

    -Right here! The less places to go the better; keep all us big guys in the same conversation.


    Clyde specific components

    -No shortage of components that are built a little extra heavy duty, if you know what you're looking for. Lightweight racy DH stuff lasts on an AM bike, AM stuff for a trailbike, etc


    Clyde sized MTB clothing

    -Never been an issue to me, and the really big guys have options if they know where to look. Really big is also pretty rare, i feel for you unicorns but there's not enough of you to justify lots of product.


    Events, Clyde Only Races, Festivals, etc.

    -At ~220 I'm squarely a clyde, but i'm not that special of a rider. I can go to an event/ride/race with everyone else, and the difference isn't obvious. There's clyde class races anyway. Really big or unusual clydes like alias350 or dabigseat (sorry for the name drops guys) aren't gonna find a group of riders that are very similar to them, event or not.

    Clyde specific gear reviews

    -That'd be great! Some stuff that holds up forever under smaller riders is carefully built to load tolerances clydes exceed. Hard to do though since there's a lot of variety in clyde shape/size, not a lot of clydes with enough experience to offer valuable reviews, and just less of us than little riders. It would take a couple really great reviewers.


    Training/weight loss/nutrition/fitness programs for Clyde athletes

    -i don't personally see the need, we're just people. If you have a lot of weight to lose then by just moderating your diet and being active it will fall off. If you're just tall then there's nothing unique to you.
    .

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    I don't think that it matters what is lacking, because us clydes are such a tiny percent of the market that it would be difficult to cater to us.
    I disagree. I believe the Clyde demographic is large, (no pun intended) and an untapped market.
    I know a lot of folks who are Clyde's and never think of riding.
    Many good business opportunities are awaiting.

  15. #15
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    I think what we need is clyde-specific gear reviews. I don't see any MTB company catering much to the clyde market, but what we could get is good clyde reviews so that we know what stuff will work and what won't

  16. #16
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    I wanted to touch back in this since its been resurrected.

    Trek/bontrager apparently has been listening to our pleas as clydes. Started adjust designs so bigger frames are built for our weight better, removing weight limits on parts by better engineering them to hold up and still back warranty with things like wheels saying "NO RIDER WEIGHT LIMIT". And performance from demo I hit shows things are improving. Same with more sizing option on apparel.

    Please let this be a sign that companies are truly hearing us here and will follow behind quickly. Newer tech and efforts of companies in seeing better wheels that aren't stupid heavy etc showing up more and more.

    KEEP IT UP CLYDES WE ARE STARTING TO BE HEARD!!!!
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  17. #17
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    I agree to disagree , let me explain:
    As far as bike parts i beleive your on the on the correct trail
    But @230 IMO...ur still in the std class (i believe its up to 250)...far as cloths if ur bigger than a 2xl good luck!! Things are far & few between...there is aero tech design which caters to "the big world" but definetly non of the more fashionable brands
    Cylde spec classes would be awesome ,ive done a few races & linjng up next to the same age bracket but 100lbs difference is quite the handicap lol
    I def agree we all (no matter how good you are now) can get in better shape(i think is everyones goal) but some of us will never be smaller guys just because of our frames (naturally my frame is just large baby shaq frame since 3rd grade hahahahahahahaha & o played sports yes (football & basketball) most of my life.........the most interestjng thing is before kids i did mx & it was so much easier to find mx gear than mtb gear go fiqure...hahahahahahaha ....
    HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYONE ....LETS RIDE HARDER & FURTHER THAN 14'
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    I wanted to touch back in this since its been resurrected.

    Trek/bontrager apparently has been listening to our pleas as clydes. Started adjust designs so bigger frames are built for our weight better, removing weight limits on parts by better engineering them to hold up and still back warranty with things like wheels saying "NO RIDER WEIGHT LIMIT". And performance from demo I hit shows things are improving. Same with more sizing option on apparel.

    Please let this be a sign that companies are truly hearing us here and will follow behind quickly. Newer tech and efforts of companies in seeing better wheels that aren't stupid heavy etc showing up more and more.

    KEEP IT UP CLYDES WE ARE STARTING TO BE HEARD!!!!
    Sent from my Nokia Stupid Phone using Tapatalk
    ^^^^thanks for the update .....cause its alot of us....imagine how many dont even take to forums
    Ride hard everytime....or take up hiking...........lol

  19. #19
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    It's not 'a lot of us'. If there are improvements in availability it's more down to improvements in tech and knowhow rather than companies making more stuff for tall / fat people. There is little or no profit in 'us' so very few people make stuff specific to 'us'.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooTallUK View Post
    It's not 'a lot of us'. If there are improvements in availability it's more down to improvements in tech and knowhow rather than companies making more stuff for tall / fat people. There is little or no profit in 'us' so very few people make stuff specific to 'us'.



    Tech plays the role of making things stronger and more durable, allowing for higher or lack of limits while still keeping in market standards.





    Saying no profit, really, ur attitude is narrow minded and way out dated. Its the same elitest attitude that has kept us limited in options. Its like saying no profit in kids bikes cause market is small. Yet the big ones are putting serious efforts into hearing us as parents complain about dysfunctional heavy ass kids bikes. TREK and specialized released bad ass bikes. Trek took its superfly and shrunk it. 19lb kids bike for $400. Before 20" mt60 was almost 28lbs.





    Market is heard, demand is met. more clydes make themselves known and stop being afraid to show themselves cause their big (cause of cyclist skin and bones thin image and elitest attitudes) the numbers will truely show themselves. Big companies putting efforts to post "no rider weight limit" says "Hey we hear u, we see ways to increase sales and profit, were on it. Why, because we can fill a growing demand at little extra cost. We researched and designed the tech, money already spent, but now we can sell it to MORE people. More sales =more profit and more happy riders coming back = more sales = more profit"
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  21. #21
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    There's nothing elitist or narrow minded about my attitude. I understand anthropometrics and percentiles exactly because I used to be frustrated that I couldn't buy anything that fitted me (6'7" tall, 245lbs).

    What is happening is that the average person is getting more Clyde.

    This might explain anthropometrics for those that don't know:
    Design Technology Wiki | Main / Ergonomics

    What happens is, manufacturers want to make stuff to sell. This means they make stuff (clothes, cars, bikes etc) based around the average (50th percentile) because more people are that sort of size. If they made something that fitted the '80th percentile', it would fit from the 10th to the 90th percentile.

    I found out that my height is the 99.9th percentile for adult male height. There are 0.1% of the global adult men of a similar height. No wonder I couldn't find much for me - there isn't any profit in me! There are so few people of my height we are a minority.

    The average US adult male is just under 5'10" tall. So I'm 9" taller. I get it.

    The average US adult male is now just under 200lbs in weight. That has gone up over the last few decades. So, the average US male is nearly a Clyde in weight. The average weight has gone up higher than height so the average BMI is now 29, one short of being obese. This is a pretty good article:
    This Is the Average Man's Body - The Atlantic

    We're seeing more bikes that can take more weight because of technology, higher safety standards, manufacturing improvements, but mostly because the average American male is almost 200lbs.

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