Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    newbie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    14

    This is a place I can fit in...

    I'm a reformed fat ass... I used to be 325 pounds @ 6'1" tall 26 years old.

    As of today I'm 225 pounds 29 years and in the best shape of my life. Eating right, lifting weights and now biking.

    I've been beating the bejeesus out of my new GF Opie since I got it. Hitting (ATV trails, cow paths, that spot between the trees) gonna to to the local terrain park, and downhill park as soon as I pick up a helmet.

    I have concerns. Mostly about my wheels and my frame.

    How much can that bike take with me on it?

  2. #2
    thread killer
    Reputation: WTF-IDK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    729
    welcome.

    first things, first. get a helmet.

    don't worry about the frame and wheels. breakage is the best reason for upgrades.
    next time

    [QUOTE=spazzy] Might as well sell your bikes, E-riding is much more productive.

  3. #3
    newbie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    14
    Helmet delay caused by empty wallet... will be fixed Friday

    I want an early start to know how big my upgrade piggy bank should be...

  4. #4
    thread killer
    Reputation: WTF-IDK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    729
    empty wallet? boy does that sound familiar.

    any good name brand helmet should do. go to the review section and do some reseach.
    then go toyour LBS and try some on. find what you like.

    upgrade piggy bank? buy a lotto ticket, and win. then send me 10% for the commission.

    no, really, save your cash.
    do what the bike needs when it needs it maybe say 2-3 hundread for emergancies. wheels, drivetrain, brakes. new cables go a long way to wake up a bike.

    no offense but you're not that big. I suspect that your bike will hold up just fine for a while.
    next time

    [QUOTE=spazzy] Might as well sell your bikes, E-riding is much more productive.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,103
    Yeah, your wheels should be fine as long as your not doing big drops. Just keep an eye out on the true of the wheels during your maintenance. I ride at 300 pounds on stock wheels on some pretty narly stuff with no issues yet. Search this section for wheels and you will get great suggestions on good heavy duty wheels if you still decide you want to upgrade.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    236
    +1 on stocker wheels.
    im round 310 on giant rincon with stock wheels, and put it through hell.
    i huck what i can, and drop off the rest. wheels are holding out fine, alil un-true at times, but overall just fine.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    614
    Definitely need a helmet. I also suggest glasses (Safety glasses from home depot can do the job if you want to conserve cash), riding gloves, and enough tools to fix a flat and other minor trailside mechanicals (tire levers, pump, inner tube, multi-tool).

    After that, I'd just replace stuff as I broke it. Do that for a while and you'll get a deeper understanding of the sport and gear and be able to make better decisions. I went over a year on my first bike before I started breaking wheels.

    Seems like you could do a lot on that bike--not sure it would be good if you were doing a lot of big jumps or drops to flat. If money is no object you might go to a full suspension. If you wanted to upgrade that bike, you might start by getting a new fork.

  8. #8
    newbie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    14
    Thanks for the tips.
    Got safety lenses in my glasses already, or wear my motorcycle sunglasses (they take rocks at highway speed they'll work for pedal power I suspect).

    Right now I'm not looking for bike upgrades just trying to size up how much a new set of rims will cost when I bork the set that's on there now. It'll happen it's just a matter of when and how.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    614
    Rhynotlite XL rims laced to XT hubs is a good replacement wheelset if you are cost conscious and value durability. Here's a set for $160.
    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...t.aspx?sc=FRGL

    Some clydes break shimano LX/XT free hubs, but many do not have this problem. Even with the breakage issue, Shimano hubs are the most economical with easy to find replacement parts and not to hard to fix yourself. the above wheel is a great next step if you break your stock wheels.

    Azonic Outlaws might be a better choice if you plan to be really abusive, but they cost a little more.

    Either way, if you get new machine built wheels, it's a good idea to take them on a fairly gentle ride and then get them re-tensioned by a shop that has someone who is good at wheel building.

    Many other options if you want to spend more money.

  10. #10
    newbie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    14
    Been a long time since I started this thread... I've gained some weight (270) since having 2 kids. But after I started this my stock rims are still true. Only parts I've replaced/upgraded have been the pedals and some lock on grips.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    711
    Hey whatever man, you are still down from "fat ass" to "big guy", and your bike is still in one piece. Sounds like you are winning to me.

  12. #12
    newbie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    14
    Thanks... I have to say I'm just amazed by the beating that this bike can handle.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •