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  1. #1
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    Pike 454 Air U-Turn

    Any Clydes using Pike 454 Air U-Turn? I have one and it is a nice fork but I wonder what kind of air pressure you are running. I'm about 240lbs. The manual says 170psi in the Positive and negative air chambers. I find the fork is super stiff at this air pressure. I've taken it down to 150psi in both chambers and it is softer but still pretty stiff. How low do I go?

  2. #2
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    I ride the 454 coil and have rode the air. I'm 230 and liked it at about 135-140psi. Take a look at this thread.

    RockShox Dual Air type fork setup data thread.

  3. #3
    STINKY TOFU
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    Dont go by the manual, RS PSI settings are WAY high. Im 190 and the manual says I should be in the 150 range, I have it down to 115.
    "I'd pee on that"
    -R. Kelly-

  4. #4
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    I notice everyone rides the 454 air. How many people have the coil version? As thats what will be on my new bike...
    I like rice.

  5. #5
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    I ride the coil. I went from the Marzocchi All Mountain SL to the Pike for the 20mm. I tried the air and went for the coil to match up with the DHX coil on my frame. I love the coil up front. I could go with heavier springs maybe. But for the $$ differance and the feel of the coil I like it better. I was just tired of messing with air PSI to find the right feel.

  6. #6
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    I am running a 454 Dual Air UT (mated with a DHXC in the back).

    At 235ish all loaded up with H2O and gear, I run it at 140 - 60% seems to be the right amount for me, and many others here. I have run it at 160, but it was super stiff and not using as much travel as justifiable on the sections where travel should be used.

    When breaking them in, most people run it at about 50% of body weight.

  7. #7
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    Pike Coil U-Turn

    I had a Pike Coil U-Turn fork on a previous bike and it was an awesome fork. I ordered the extra heavy spring for it and it was perfect for my 240lbs. It is very easy to swap out the springs too. It has a different feel than the air and I would say it has a plusher ride over all. On the other hand, it seems I have been running way to high air pressure in my 454 Air so we'll see how it does with 120-130lbs of air pressure.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for your help!

    I set the air pressure to 140psi in both the pos & neg air chambers and it was awesome. Like night and day. I've always read reviews of people that say their Pike Airs are so plush. Well, now mine is too.

  9. #9
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    Nice.
    I just did an oil change and installed the Enduro Seal Kit after 1 year of (ab)use - back to being superplush. Compression dampening is better than I remember it having been and fork just sticks to the ground, tracks much better thru the rocky stuff.
    I love my Pike.

  10. #10
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    454 break-in

    I'm messing with my settings still and am curious about how long the break-in period should be. I've had about 6 decently long rides on it and am working on balancing it out with a new RP23 and it's feeling a bit soft right now at ~%50 body weight.

    So how many miles of riding on typical aggressive XC trails before I can call it broken in?

  11. #11
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    I would go ahead and bump it up to 60% body weight and see how it feels. With a little TLC, those wipers will have been broken in already and the out of the box sticktion cleared up.

    I would say it is broken in unless you are still having sticktion. At 50%, I am sure it feels soft!

  12. #12
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    For those that have ridden both coil and air versions - you like the coil more ? Why ? I have ridden air forks , in the past, that suffered from weak midstoke air spring characteristics how does the Pike air fair ? Thanx

  13. #13
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    Pike 454 Air vs. Coil

    I have owned both forks and currently have the 454 Air U-Turn model. First off, both forks are awesome. The biggest differences are the lighter weight of the air model along with more tuneability. It has taken a while for me to get the air fork tuned for my weight as the suggested air pressure given by Rockshox is much higher than what is actually needed. The feedback I got on here helped me get the air fork properly tuned. The coil version is not as tuneable so getting the propper spring is critical for the fork to work properly. I'm a clydesdale at 240lbs and ran the extra heavy spring and it was perfect. On the air fork I am running 140 positive and 120 negative air pressures. The manual as well as the chart on the fork say to run 170+ and 170- which make the fork so stiff I couldn't get more than
    3" of travel even on 4-5' drops. Now I get about 5" but have still not bottomed out the fork.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 67degrees
    I have owned both forks and currently have the 454 Air U-Turn model. First off, both forks are awesome. The biggest differences are the lighter weight of the air model along with more tuneability. It has taken a while for me to get the air fork tuned for my weight as the suggested air pressure given by Rockshox is much higher than what is actually needed. The feedback I got on here helped me get the air fork properly tuned. The coil version is not as tuneable so getting the propper spring is critical for the fork to work properly. I'm a clydesdale at 240lbs and ran the extra heavy spring and it was perfect. On the air fork I am running 140 positive and 120 negative air pressures. The manual as well as the chart on the fork say to run 170+ and 170- which make the fork so stiff I couldn't get more than
    3" of travel even on 4-5' drops. Now I get about 5" but have still not bottomed out the fork.
    Do you find any shortcoming on the air vs. coil ? I have ridden a Z1 SL and a Float 36RC2 - both forks had super soft midstrokes because air is progressive, but the progression is usually toward the end of the stroke on larger volumes (forks). I always found coils to have a soft beginning but have a firm middle that runs linear to the end stroke. I weigh 210 and don't want a mushy fork or one that rides stiff with poor small bump compliance ala Z1 & Float.

  15. #15
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    454 Air Shortcomings?

    Quote Originally Posted by keen
    Do you find any shortcoming on the air vs. coil ? I have ridden a Z1 SL and a Float 36RC2 - both forks had super soft midstrokes because air is progressive, but the progression is usually toward the end of the stroke on larger volumes (forks). I always found coils to have a soft beginning but have a firm middle that runs linear to the end stroke. I weigh 210 and don't want a mushy fork or one that rides stiff with poor small bump compliance ala Z1 & Float.

    Hey Keen!

    I just got in from a ride that had a little bit of every type of trail condition thrown in with the exception of mud. I don't detect any soft midstroke action on the Pike Air forks. I'd say it is pretty progressive the way I have it set up. You can adjust the compression and floodgate on the fly from super plush to practically locked out. This is one of the coolest features of the Pike. This was exactly the same on the coil Pike too. The right leg has all the motion control damping and I believe they are the same in both forks. The only two drawbacks I can think of is that the Pike air is more expensive and if the seals ever blew out on a ride it could leave you walking. I've never heard of this happening with the Pike air but I have heard of it happening on Fox, Marzocchi and Manitou forks. By no means is the Pike air mushy feeling but if you follow Rockshox's setup for air pressure it will be way too firm. For your weight I'd set it up 125-135 in the positive air and 110-120 in the negative air chamber.

  16. #16
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    I am about 240lb when I hit the trail. I am an odd one in that I actually like the stiffer ride that using the recommended pressures give. Even then if I get the bike off of a 4' to flat it uses up all of the travel. I do prefer the air fork as I can tune it stiff for my riding. I would define my riding as aggressive but usually chasing xc riding buddies, so I can't have the thing sloshing all over like a freeride fork.

    I was very impressed by the coil fork, but found it to be too linear. It was great on trail rides, but would bottom out on anything over about 3' down. That was with the X-firm kit.

    Depending on your ride style either air or coil can be setup very nice. For me the air is just a better fit.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

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