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  1. #1
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    Obstacle clearing as a Clyde

    I'm having a lot of trouble learning this. My fork is just shy of 4 inches of travel, but I dont think its the problem. I seriously cannot lift the front of my bike in preparation to clear even a curb. I standup but cant get behind the seat enough, which is odd, because when I first got the bike I could get behind the seat, and now, 16 lb lighter, the wider WTB Speed V Sport seat cant make it through my thighs... but I'm not sure if its the problem.

    I can jump around on my front sus during normal riding, but I cant seem to be able to lift my wheel in prep to clear an obstacle. I have cleared obstacles and rocks in very very ugly fashions.. mostly by slamming into them with no tire lift, letting the sus do the work, and sometimes forgetting to even get up as the rear tire slams into the other side of the rock.

    What am I doing wrong? Is there some piece of form or finesse I should work on? How do you clear obstacles taller than your pedal cog is off the ground? I got major metal-showing scrapes on my shiny black cranks. I watched a guy try to show me how he was clearing, a few times, but he's a lot smaller and lighter and it looked effortless, while I couldnt even get my wheel up.

    Its sad, I know, but I gotta learn somehow.
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  2. #2
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    Sounds like you and I learned how to ride from the same book. I can usually pop my front up just enough to help it clear but it still hits the object at least a little. I also forget to do anything with the rear and my back wheel slams and rolls over whatever I am going over. One of my problems is forgetting to keep the pedals even instead of having one foot down. One of my pedals is always slamming into rocks and stuff. Have you looked on YouTube. There are some videos on how to ride mountain bikes. Also, I think a lot of it just comes with experience and riding with experienced riders.

  3. #3
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    Are you doing a power stroke just before hitting the curb or obstacle?

  4. #4
    local trails rider
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    Getting the front wheel up a little should be easy. One way is to first push down and then pull on the bar. Sort of like hitting a basket ball to make it bounce off the ground.

  5. #5
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    Are you doing a power stroke just before hitting the curb or obstacle?
    I am trying to, yes, I still have to learn to keep my pedals even though.

    Getting the front wheel up a little should be easy. One way is to first push down and then pull on the bar. Sort of like hitting a basket ball to make it bounce off the ground.
    In my head my technique, if I can remember right, is just trying to stand up and yank up as hard as I can. I am not 100% sure that I did not push down first, but I know that I consciously did not strive to, while I may have done it... so I'm going to have to watch how I do it, and purposefully try to bounce off my sus by pushing as hard as I can down first. I'll give this a try after work.
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  6. #6
    local trails rider
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    Don't try the pedal stroke and the "bounce" at the same time: that would be too many things happening at the same time, for me.

    The bounce needs to be a pretty rapid movement and a soft fork or lots of rebound damping may make it ineffective too.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster
    Sounds like you and I learned how to ride from the same book. I can usually pop my front up just enough to help it clear but it still hits the object at least a little. I also forget to do anything with the rear and my back wheel slams and rolls over whatever I am going over. One of my problems is forgetting to keep the pedals even instead of having one foot down. One of my pedals is always slamming into rocks and stuff. Have you looked on YouTube. There are some videos on how to ride mountain bikes. Also, I think a lot of it just comes with experience and riding with experienced riders.
    Its dumb that I looked for YouTube and ExpertVilliage videos for learning to tune my rear derailleur, but forgot to look for it on obstacle clearing techniques. I'll hit up the tube and EV when I get from work, before attempting perttime's suggestions as well.
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  8. #8
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    Sounds like to me you are trying to do all the work with just your arms. You have to remember to lean back a little while your pulling up the front of the bike. Just dont lean back to far or you will end up on your ass.

  9. #9
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    I found this thread to be helpful:

    Bunnyhop tutorial VIDEO
    Bunnyhop tutorial VIDEO

    A lot of good info in the thread and the videos break the process down quite well.

  10. #10
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    it depends on the setup of the bike alot, weight distribution etc etc

    on my old bike I could just about lift the front off the ground with a lot of strain on the back, on the new one I can comfortably lift the whole bike into the air easily.

  11. #11
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    I've been riding a motorcycle (dirt) for 4 years or so and suspension setup is very important when you've got some weight on ya. I was 260ish and the stock suspension was setup for a 170lbs rider. Not good! Once I set up my suspension with the proper springs for my weight, the difference was night and day.
    Anyway, I assume bike suspensions would work similarly. Maybe try stiffening up the forks with the adjusters, assuming you have them, or stiffer springs?
    The little bounce, especially with front sus, can help alot! I've been working on it on my rigid and even the little tire bounce makes a difference.
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  12. #12
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    That video and thread dog.gone posted is about as good of instruction as you are ever going to get on the subject. The rest is up to you, it takes practice. I was ahead of the curve coming from a bmx background, but I do remember learning to j-hop way back in the day. It isn't easy at first. Many a box was crushed learning the ropes
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  13. #13
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    fit could be part of the issue also bars to far forward or to low made it difficult for me to get it up (har har).... when I went to a set of riser bars I could wheelie away on every start if I wanted... also make sure your KOPS is right (or at least nearish)... sheldon has some info about and against kops http://www.sheldonbrown.com/kops.html

    also some flat pedals and some time just messing around in your hard is a good place to start
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  14. #14
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    We have... good progress.. didnt try to pedal through the curbs.. I let my momentum carry me over, as I timed a big push down with a pull up on my bars like suggested.. it worked A LOT better.. I didnt even feel myself clearing the curb, as I was already standing.. I just felt an elevation change. Next is clearing obstacles with drops, and getting comfortable enough with front tire lift to push a hard pedal stroke though.. which I presume is necessary for bigger obstacles.

    I didnt get to watch the guide, by the time I got home the sun was all but dead, my options were to ride or watch.. I chose to ride. I'm going to try and watch them today or tomorrow. Today when I get home, my Windows 7 installation expires, so I gotta re-install everything with the new release candidate. I'll try and make time so I can give some feedback on the effect of the guide on me.

    Thanks all.
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  15. #15
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    There are a lot of things to take into consideration:

    1. Bar height relative to saddle height. Your bars should be just about even. I run mine 1" to 1 1/2" lower than my saddle. Any lower and you won't be able to get over the rear wheel enough to loft the front end.

    2. Saddle position relative to rear wheel. For smaller obstacles, I will remain seated, pulling on the bars, sitting up and back to weight the rear wheel. You should be able to remain seated while going over a curb. It's actually easier that way.

    3. Stem length. The longer the stem, the more you're going to weight the front tire and make it more difficult to get the front end up.

    Basically, you have to be weighting the rear wheel to the point that the front wheel wants to come up. You should have your cockpit set up so that it's neutral when you're just riding along on flats, but you want to be able to shift weight easily forward or rearward depending on if you are climbing or clearing an obstacle.

  16. #16
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    yup for steps you want to do it at a decent speed... with your pedals flat and lift the front over the obstical then move your body weight forward (and down onto the pedal)... moving your body weight forward will let your bike just roll smoothly over things... it's nerve racking at 1st... and can be a smidge painful if you don't get the proper loft to the top of the step haha... start with curbs and move on up... make sure you get your weight off the rear wheel
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  17. #17
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by donalson
    make sure you get your weight off the rear wheel
    Yup: you dont want to pinch flat the rear tyre when going up curbs.

    When I go up a curb, I try to time a sort of a "mini jump", so that my feet stay on the pedals but there is almost no weight on the rear when the rear tyre hits the edge.

    Going down curbs, I practice my wimpy drops: keeping the front wheel up or doing a small hop so that both tyres hit the ground at the same time.

  18. #18
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    Actually, I have found the bunny hop to work well. I'm not an expert by any means, but I try to use my weight on my pedals as my power source. So when I jump a curb / bump:

    - I get a little speed (this is the toughest thing to judge for me)
    - As I approach, I bounce my weight into my pedals and my handlebars (although most of the power is really coming from my weight on the pedals)
    - Then I lift with my arms to allow the frot wheel to clear
    - In my case the back wheel hits the curb and carries over.

    As I am getting better, I am trying to pull up with both my arms THEN my feet. More of a true bunny hop. I can feel the back wheel starting to stay off the ground longer.

  19. #19
    local trails rider
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    Bunny hops work great for going up or over things. It has a couple of limitations, though:
    - to actually clear something, you need some speed to get the distance. Sometimes that speed is not available.
    - before you can hop, you need to be able to lift the front... I think we are getting that covered.

  20. #20
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    Actually, I have found the bunny hop to work well. I'm not an expert by any means, but I try to use my weight on my pedals as my power source. So when I jump a curb / bump:

    - I get a little speed (this is the toughest thing to judge for me)
    - As I approach, I bounce my weight into my pedals and my handlebars (although most of the power is really coming from my weight on the pedals)
    - Then I lift with my arms to allow the frot wheel to clear
    - In my case the back wheel hits the curb and carries over.

    As I am getting better, I am trying to pull up with both my arms THEN my feet. More of a true bunny hop. I can feel the back wheel starting to stay off the ground longer.
    Lots of stuff to try, from lots of sources, looking forward to experimenting and feedback. I'm waiting for my clipless exchange from Pricepoint to come in, so I can try that bunny hop where I can help lift my bike with the pedals. I got some bmx (Wellgo LU95 I think) platform pedals on my mtb right now, very wide platforms, yesterday my feet slipped off as I came up on an ascent in my low gear.. and I was trying to build speed... I hit that hill with both feet off the pedals in a sort of panic as I tried to regain foot position.. my rear end felt more of that mistake than the back of my leg that the pedal bit into.. was my first "pedal bite" since I started biking again.. felt like a dog bite. What can I say, I got spoiled by the clipless and got careless I think.

    Anyhow, I wonder if pumping into the pedals will help, I'm going to try. I've been heaving the weight of my torso in my front sus bounce, and just trying to lean my rear back.. will try the full body bounce. Hopefully not off the sidewalk.
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  21. #21
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    bunny hops work well... like mentioned... IF you have the height and speed... I'm just getting to where I can clear small logs and an occasional curb... the big issue with bunny hops is if you don't get the distance you catch the back tire all your weight is dropping on it... good way to pinch flat (I know from experiance)
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  22. #22
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    as long as you have flats you can also work on a "proper" bunny hop... start with riding in your yard getting the front wheel up... when you can do that pretty well work towards a bunny hop...

    seriously just messing around in the yard you can learn a lot... and nothing realy gets hurt beyond your pride when you fall... which will happen ;-)
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  23. #23
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    Any advice on clearing obstacles you know will rub below your bike on the main pedal cog possibly?
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  24. #24
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    get rid of the big ring and go with a 2x9 or 1x9 setup ;-)...
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  25. #25
    local trails rider
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    I went for singlespeed and 1x9 with bashrings
    I know there's people who can clear big fallen trees: get the front wheel up, maybe let it bounce from the obstacle, keep the front high until the rear clears.
    I'll carry the bike over that tree...

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Red
    Any advice on clearing obstacles you know will rub below your bike on the main pedal cog possibly?
    I wish I could find the video I saw a few weeks back of a kid on a 9r going over a log that was roughly the same diameter of the wheels on his bike (IIRC). It was a lot of fun to watch - and more than a little inspirational.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Red
    Any advice on clearing obstacles you know will rub below your bike on the main pedal cog possibly?
    There are a few instructional videos if you look around. Basically, you loft the front wheel onto the object, pedal kick to get the rear wheel up, and push forward to land the rear wheel on said object.

    Yeah, I know, real easy

    Trouble is that you need to have some speed up to get the front wheel to kick the front end of the bike high enough and so that your rear wheel will land on the object. Kind of scares the crap out of me.

  28. #28
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    Ok, I'll get a chance to try everything on Friday again, I'll be watching the videos and instructions today. Yesterday was hard, I had spinning, followed by group meditation, followed by installing Win 7 release candidate on a free virtual partition, along with all my programs and drivers and Age of Conan (my addiction). I got to bed by 2:35am.

    Today I got the hardest spinning class the place offers, with a demented roadie, so I question whether I'll be up for my usual 13.15 or 14.78 mile ride. I've done it before after this guys class, so maybe I'll get to try today too.. its hard, have to get on the bike as soon as you get home or you start feeling all the damage you've just done riding up an imaginary hill, without sitting down, with the resistance cranked to "quicksand" for an hour .. and if you dont suffer, the dude comes up and calls you on it! ..

    I dont want to think about it anymore.. its harder to think about it than actually do it. I have a line from Fight Club that repeats in my head during class.. "and he ran, and he ran, and he ran till his legs felt like they were pumping battery acid."

    /rant off

    I'm just disappointed I wont get to try the techniques till later, especially since its one of those rarities in life known as both 'fun & useful'... I was hoping to continue a pace of feedback, but it'll be ok.
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  29. #29
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    Alright, I got a full weekends worth of practice. Its less scary now for sure. I ran into the issue of when I get tired, I start losing proper timing on bouncing off the front sus, or even standing up at the right time.. after 17 miles and many curbs, I was just toast. At that time it helped to start priming my bounce with my feet too, not just my arms pushing in and then up.

    Almost had my first endo on a big root that swallowed my wheel on a new trail I found here.. would have made a good case for a 29er. Capping off a weekend of firsts was my first pinchflat as I didnt stand up fast enough to clear my rear tire from a curb practice session, on the last curb, and woke up the next morning to a surprise flat rear tire with 2 holes! Finishing that off with a "I finally know why this patch kit has 2 small patches stuck next to each-other, separated by clear plastic" moment.

    At least I was at home and with a decent pump with pressure gauge and not out in the woods with my little hand pump... oh my hand would have huuuurt...

    I'll be running that back tire at 65 psi while I have paved curbs in my itinerary plans.

    PS: On a side note.. as a lesson learned... its a horrible idea to try and clear a curb while a bike wheel is not straight.. coming in from a drop in a circle to the curb.. oh my poor wrist.
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  30. #30
    local trails rider
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    Things tend to get more difficult when you are tired....

    I bet I learn something every time I go out to ride. I don't think of it as practice: I am just riding my bike.

  31. #31
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    yup when you get tired you get lazy... it gets harder to time those things......
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    Things tend to get more difficult when you are tired....

    I bet I learn something every time I go out to ride. I don't think of it as practice: I am just riding my bike.
    I guess when I say practice, its more of a judgment on my skills. But I guess riding is riding, even if you do fail and/or dont know what you're doing.

    If you havnt read my old passion post. All this conditioning and obstacle clearance learning is really about me getting prepared to go back to Spraug Brook Park where I got stranded late April. Just dont know how much is enough, but I need obstacle practice worst of all, and learning to be ok with steep downhill / uphill. I've been a particularly harsh judge of myself after that experience.

    Maybe if I become Ok with not wanting to go back and redeem myself, I could let it all go and enjoy myself. But till then, either case, I'd like to become better and hit more dirt than pavement
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  33. #33
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    the thread that dog.gone is thinking of:

    I found proof 29ers roll over stuff easier.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by anavrinIV
    the thread that dog.gone is thinking of:

    I found proof 29ers roll over stuff easier.
    omg dude, you trying to get me killed? who sets up an obstacle like that even.
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Red
    omg dude, you trying to get me killed? who sets up an obstacle like that even.
    When we're through with you you'll be bunny hopping that thing!

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvibert
    When we're through with you you'll be bunny hopping that thing!
    he...he...he...he... i dont think even a real bunny could hop over that log... that fixie rider must have planned that or tried alot cause his pedals are in the exact right position.. a little off and it woudl have been crash... great thread though...

  37. #37
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Red
    I guess riding is riding, even if you do fail and/or dont know what you're doing.
    I don't always know what I am doing either I suppose I have enough saddle time that my mind and body know how to react to things that I typically encounter on my local trails.

    I am pretty sure that practicing stuff is a way to learn faster. I don't want to do it because taking a hobby/sport/whatever too seriously does not seem to suit me. I have no rule against going back to an interesting spot, another day

    I just got back from a short ride (one hour, just over 11 km). Throwing my weight around on the twisty rocky trails went pretty smoothly, the two spots where I need a little jump went OK (except the second one would be cool if I could get a little more distance). Found a good piece of trail I knew was there but had not seen since last year, and then in the other direction: almost went over the bar at a narrow spot where I did not have much time to see where the roots and rocks were... Good ride. Short enough that I could push my pace a bit.

  38. #38
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    I found a great solution for me, but it has produced a slight problem. I had originally set up my seat for optimal pedal stroke power and efficiency and its pretty high. I was having trouble getting behind it, and getting enough bend in my knees for good front-end lifts.

    How did you guys strike the right balance between clearance and leg power optimization? My bike is dialed in to long duration leg power on paved pathl.. but that makes it difficult to clear the seat or raise the front easily. Sitting on the lower seat, just seeing my knees go out at angles, is odd and I can feel the power loss.
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  39. #39
    local trails rider
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    I mostly ride with the seat high and have no problems getting the front up and over things. Getting behind the seat can be awkward with the seat high, but lots of people do it fine. A lot of time, what I do in steepish spots is: -- how would I put it -- stand on pedals, lower my chest over the top tube without moving towards the front of the bike. Most of the time that keeps my center of gravity between the wheels....

    If you have long climbs and long descents, you can adjust seat height at the top. My hills are too short for me to bother. Then there's seat posts that let you adjust height by pushing a button or pulling a lever.

  40. #40
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    VICTORY!... she is mine!... but.. at a price.

    I was able to clear the boulder on the path which launched this whole thread that was shown to me by a fellow mtber and I couldnt do it right there and at that time and almost killed myself trying.. it had I think a 10" or higher rise and fall, was semi-flat at the top, and depending on your angle of approach, could end before the 2nd wheel had gotten on the boulder.

    Yesterday I cleared it several times from 2 different angles of approach. However, during my 2nd to last clearing, coming from an upward angle, I cleared the boulder but my bike slowly rolled into the lip of the paved path I ride, and didnt have the speed to roll over, as I did my First Over The Handlebars (yay!) in slow motion. I had enough mental time from the beginning of the fall to the end to say "and.. now, I'm.. falling". Bam.. elbowed the pavement, big ass bruise and cut on my knee too.. of course I was so hyped I felt almost none of the pain during or 1 hour after the impact.. later that night my neck hurt and wrist had limited movement. This morning, the bruise is bigger but looks fine, neck pain is gone, the scars on my elbow and knee are healing just fine, but my WRIST effing HURTS! ... I brought my laptop to work and tried to plug in the cord with my palm upwards and it wouldnt slide in easy.. son of a.. it hurts to remember.

    My doc gets into the office in 10 minuets, I got his number written down. Maybe a sprain or fracture I figure. I got spinning class today. I have fist wraps that I used when I fought for the university and they immobilize the wrist if I wrap them right, I'm gonna do that as soon as I get home and try spinning and climbing with one hand on the bars and call it a challenge.

    Theres a girl there that I think I got a shot with in class and I already figured I'd tell her that I had only now found out that MJ was dead, when she asks why I am wearing only one bike glove, to get her going

    Thx all for the help, it felt very accomplished to finally clear that thing.
    Last edited by The Red; 07-13-2009 at 07:37 AM.
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  41. #41
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    Back from the doc. I'm using my old fist-wraps as wrist-wraps to eliminate movement and bending, after seeing which, he said he's not going to prescribe a wrist immobilizer since they appear to be working better than that would.

    I have been given Celebrex, he wants me on a longer regiment than ibuprofen would permit because of how it causes me to bleed internally from having taken too much of it in my martial arts years.

    If the pain persists, he wants me in for x-rays, but for now he thinks its just a bad sprain.

    Sadly, I think I'm off the bike for a bit, I'm gonna try getting on with the wraps on and trying to take it easy, no drops or curb or boulder hopping, just for exercise. What'll be hell is spinning class with one hand with 20 minuet climbs... oh I'm not looking forward to that, its tomorrow, and thursday is another where the demented roadie teaches, who likes to see us suffer, till most of the class is sitting involuntarily.

    Lets hope I recover, I got a 2 week trip coming up, I fly out for on Aug 03 to the Vimutti Buddhist monastery in NZ, I want my wrist to be good for hauling the luggage. I wish I could bring my bike.
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  42. #42
    local trails rider
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    That sucks....
    Still, better let that wrist heal properly.

    I've had my share of falls, and a few that could be called crashes, but I guess I've been lucky: no serious injuries.

    Here's a few that have happened to me:
    - In traffic: a car hit my bike, in the pedal, after passing the "yield" sign. I landed flat on my belly. The doctor determined my hand was not broken but it took a couple of weeks before the pain subsided completely.
    - The irritating one: I failed to see a little tree stump and it sent me over the bar. My thigh hit something on the way. I had to ride my FS bike exclusively for a couple of months: I could pedal OK but riding over bumps on the singlespeed HT was painful.
    - The spectacular one: slipped when entering a wooden bridge at some speed, and still turning. I rolled on the bridge and ground like crashed MotoGP riders. Parts of my riding gear went flying all over the place....

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    That sucks....
    Still, better let that wrist heal properly.

    I've had my share of falls, and a few that could be called crashes, but I guess I've been lucky: no serious injuries.

    Here's a few that have happened to me:
    - In traffic: a car hit my bike, in the pedal, after passing the "yield" sign. I landed flat on my belly. The doctor determined my hand was not broken but it took a couple of weeks before the pain subsided completely.
    - The irritating one: I failed to see a little tree stump and it sent me over the bar. My thigh hit something on the way. I had to ride my FS bike exclusively for a couple of months: I could pedal OK but riding over bumps on the singlespeed HT was painful.
    - The spectacular one: slipped when entering a wooden bridge at some speed, and still turning. I rolled on the bridge and ground like crashed MotoGP riders. Parts of my riding gear went flying all over the place....
    See, I worry bout the stumps and flat sided boulders on some of my rides, I too am too often daydreaming and just know I'll get hurt for it sooner rather than later.

    I hope someone was watching for that last one. Especially of the female persuasion. I described my two other memorable crashes in the passion forum, let me copy and paste.

    A long downhill meant for a service road, covered fresh loose gravel. My front wheel skipped and skidded, I somehow lost control and fell forwards, flinging my arms ahead of me to brace for impact. I impacted gravel under my skin and many antibiotic treatments later, was still ripping the skin off and washing it out in what seemed like an endless infection. To me, it still feels like theres a small piece of gravel in my left palm when I press down really hard. That was in my teens.

    A few months ago I took a sharp left turn, blind, and didnt see that there was an immediate descent down the paved path, so I did the natural thing of leaning into it.. well, it started dropping faster and turning.. by this time I was struggling to remain on the path, since I had taken the original turn blind and at high speed.. so, next, the paved path decides it wants to no longer be flat and drops on an angle towards the creek by which its laid.. leaving me already pretty much a foot from the raod as the road is now leaning towards me and me leaning into my turn only flung my tyres down the already declined end... anyhow.. short story long, I shortly made contact with the pavement, the bike went skidding, and I rolled like a barrel for a serious distance, off and back on and back off the pavement. In the end, I had only scraped one arm pretty bad on the initial landing, the rest were bruised elbows, sore arm muscles for holding up to the crazy roll, and grass skid stains that were so embedded in my skin, you could have mistaken them for tattoos next to my blood. I looked like a x-mas tree. The stinging on my arms was NUTS.. forget the road rash, I thought that I rolled through a batch of ivy or stinging nettles, but I think it was just a bad rash, right along the outer arm where its bony, so I got really scraped.. but didnt rip any big chunks... just looked like I took a claw to the arm.

    I was damn happy it was a barrel roll, I dont care for how long, as long as it was not a face planting endo, I was happy.
    A memorable almost-crash for me was when I was on the paved bike path and this cute little cute asian girl was jogging in front of me with an ipod, I go to pass her on the left, look up and she looks at some asian guy running in my direction from ahead of her, then, does a U-turn right into me, less than 3 feet away... I hit both brakes and swerve to the right, skidding, and shaving about 4' of tire tread off my rear tire as it skids forward, left and right at the same time, while I have a death-grip on the lever. Damn.. she was cute though, and if I had fallen, maybe she could 'nurse' me back to health over the weeks it would take my road-rash to heal
    Be excellent to each other.

  44. #44
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    I found this thread pretty interesting in that it talks about clearing a specific obstacle, and includes a picture of a person doing it. For me it was helpful to see how different riders commented on the same obstacle. Anyway, take a look if interested.

    Climb Question on McDowell Long Comp Loop

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bike_Muchacho
    I found this thread pretty interesting in that it talks about clearing a specific obstacle, and includes a picture of a person doing it. For me it was helpful to see how different riders commented on the same obstacle. Anyway, take a look if interested.

    Climb Question on McDowell Long Comp Loop
    Read that thread over.. I think I need to be lighter to attempt something like that. I'm down 20lb in just a few months, and its been an amazing trip, but that kind of ledge would kill me.

    I also figured out that I did not injure my wrist in my first real OTB, I injured it because of repeatedly clearing this rock. I'm not getting my front high enough.

    I'm using pertime's advice and bouncing, well, the front bounces, I get up and over, but my wrists take a serious jolt when the wheel hits, for some reason. I think I'm not getting high enough. The other mtb rider who I saw clear this, leaned back instead of forward, when raising his front. Where as I lean forward and bounce my front wheel with all my might. I get up and over but my wrists get banged up on big obstacles like this boulder, especially if I do it repeatedly like that day.

    I need to learn to lean back instead of forward, I just gotta figure out a way to do it, as a big dude.
    Be excellent to each other.

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