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  1. #1
    Gig 'Em Aggies !
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    not loosin ANYTHING!

    ok started riding about a month ago. roughly 5.4 miles of daily commute and the 7 mile trail ride once every weekend. and yet ive lost nothing. eating hasnt changed much and stayed bout the same but i thought that biking would show results. am i being impatient or am i missing something ?
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  2. #2
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    hmm with that kind of riding u would expect to lose something.. sounds like a diet would help out alot.. i started teh weight watchers points system and its worked great for me so far losing on average of about 2-3 lbs a week with riding 2wice a week.

  3. #3
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    what is your HR during the rides? and how much are you eating? also your current weight and other activities for the day.

  4. #4
    Gig 'Em Aggies !
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    sorry not familiar with the lingo. "HR" ? whats that mean. eating the normal 3 meals a day but ive never been into calorie counting or "organic" eating or anything like that. not huge meals just filling. snack here and there nothing crazy or out of the ordinary but deff not in diet mode. im 5'10 and 240 as of this moment. i thought if i left the eating part the same and just biked daily i would loose. is this faulty logic ?
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  5. #5
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    HR = heart rate.

    when you say 3 meals a day, what do they normally consist of .. and the snacks? ...

    your logic is close .. but if you are eating to much calories you still won't loose with the biking ... even if your heart rate is up in the 60 to 80% of max ...

    now if your biking each day consisted of some harder pushes on the bike to get your HR up more (for a longer period of time) you may see a difference after a while ... but without at least keeping an eye on your calorie intake (even if just avged) it can be hard to predict or control

  6. #6
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    ...along with the scale you need to do other measurments... pick up a mayo tape (or a tape measure) and measure things like neck, chest, waist, abs, hips and legs....

    you may be surprised about your "losses"... or not...

    on a side note... 5 miles isn't much... its something (and I'd love a commute like that) but realy it's what, 20-30 min of riding tops? at that point my body is just getting warmed up and you're splitting that into 2 rides... perhaps ride one way to work and take a long route on the way home?... use it to drop the stress for the day or something ... perhaps a ride durring lunch... on the weekend rides try bumping that trail ride a little longer...

    a diet will go a REAL long way though for weight drop... but thats not near as fun as riding
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  7. #7
    BIG and Bald
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    I'm not into calorie counting either but it does help to have some idea of how many calories foods contain. I follow what's called "The Big Daddy Diet". A trainer that I worked with a couple of years ago introduced it to me. It basically consists of the usual...

    - less fat and carbs

    - more dark green veggies and fruits

    - smaller portions, more frequent meals (even if this involves a meal replacement bar or protein shake)

    I also have a pie chart to go by that simulates the meal portion size and it's broken down into veggies, protein and carbs...no ratios or percentages to deal with.

    Also, I've recently had to come to the realization that it's okay to be a little bit hungry. Just because you have a slight hunger feeling, doesn't mean you have to remedy it right away. Protein shakes and small, fat free fruit bars help curb the hunger until the next meal. Wal-Mart sells a great Whey Protein mix that is under $15!!!

    Over the last few weeks I've dropped near 15lbs or so just by controlling what I eat (minimal exercise since we've had such nasty weather) and not gorging myself. I still have the occassional Wendy's or Pizza Hut but not as frequent and not in as big of a quantity.

    You have to look at it as a lifestyle change, not just "being on a diet". Depending on how you're eating now, it may take a couple of weeks for your body to adjust from not getting the greasy, fatty, sugary foods but it will adjust. It's kind of like withdrawls of a drug addict.

    Good luck but remember, there HAS to be at least some effort on your part in the form of food control.
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  8. #8
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    I'll echo what the others have said regarding watching what you eat. I went from being more or less inactive to riding 2-3X a week for a few months without really losing any weight. I was eating the same as before, and also gorged myself after a ride, which negated any caloric deficit I had achieved from the ride. In November I started watching what I eat, mainly through portion control and cutting down on snacking. I'm now down 16lbs, and that includes a couple of big eating holidays in the middle where I gained a few pounds back.

    Like Donalson said, a tape measure can be a better indicator of your progress. I didn't start using one until I had lost about 5lbs, but 5lbs after that I had lost over an inch on my waist, over two on my hips, an inch off my man-boobs (chest), and a bit from my neck and biceps. My thigh measurement has stayed the same, though I can tell there's a lot less fat on them, and I'm a stronger rider, so surely more muscle too. So while you may not be losing much weight, your body composition and measurements may be improving a lot.

    Keep up the exercise, and just watch what you eat. You don't have to "diet," just make a conscious effort to eat a bit less at each meal, and resist the urge to snack.

  9. #9
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    If you aren't at least conscious of what you are putting into your body then you are definately handycapping yourself. Keeping that in mind, simple changes can make a huge difference in your calorie intake. For example, prepare your own food, this means don't eat out. A mean prepared at home will likely have between 20 and 50% fewer calories than one bought at a restaurant. Second, what do you drink? Liquids typically make up 30% of an individuals daily caloric intake, yet provide little (if any) satiation. Are you getting enough water? Do you enjoy a more than occassional beer, these little guys add up to a lot.
    Weight loss is all about calorie deficit. A deficit of 500 calories per day will lose you a pound a week. 500 calories is easily trimmed from a "normal" diet, just by being conscious of what you take in. 500 calories is about a 45 minute bike ride at a high level of intenstity, this number can change based on a variety of factors. So if your weight is steady now, either be conscious of what you eat or ride more, or both.
    Try keeping a food journal for three or four days. Write down everything you consume, try to include portions and times. This will shed a lot of light on where you can trim back calories without missing out on what you really enjoy.

  10. #10
    Optimum Value
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    I don't know about you, but whenever I go for a ride, I ride HARD. Meaning that I burn around 1k calories per hour. Depending on the ride, its usually 1-2 hours 3 times a week. Since I started, I went from 270 in October, to 240 in December, then back up to 250 now because of the holidays. Overall I have lost around a pound a week without changing any diet whatsoever. I have always ate healthy, just ate a lot of food. You need many more hours per week, or at least per workout in order to have your body burn a noticeable amount of fat. This is because when you are only 15 minutes in, you are basically just burning the Glycogen in your muscles, while that is good for your fitness, it may not do enough justice for your goal. The best thing I can say for someone to loose weight is to change your diet, Workout harder and/or longer, and workout more efficiently so that you get the maximum improvement out of your time. Overall, you should really try to get your fitness up, because after you get that to a high level, your metabolism will kick in and hopefully help you with your goal. Good luck, and have fun riding!

  11. #11
    My Brain Hurts!
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    Lot's of great advice here. But, unless I missed something you didn't post what you eat in a day.

    Simple, simple way - Eat only whole foods try to make it a point to eat raw veggies. A quick rule, no processed anything, no enriched white anything no soda diet or otherwise and nothing that ends in "os" You know, cheetos, doritos etc....

    If it grows in the ground, out of the ground, hangs off what grows in the ground or eats what grows in the ground, then you can eat it.

    As far as your ride, you have to get your heart rate to a point where you are burning fat. I find that when I ride to work it does not really do much. Why? I only have a 1 mile ride to work. Also, if you ride in your work clothes, chances are you won't want to work up a sweat. So, not much in the way of weight loss alone.

    Weight loss is not easy, and no one thing is key. Though I submit if you cut all the junk food and unhealthy fast food choices out and modify your diet, that alone will probably result in weight loss of some measure.

    And remember, if you eat fewer calories than you burn, you will lose weight. Just make sure you are making healthy choices for total health.

    Good luck!
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

  12. #12
    In the rear with the beer
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    You may actually be eating some more but not noticing it since your are just a little extra hungry from the riding you are doing. Heck, eat a clif bar and a gatorade and you may be taking in more calories than you burn on a 5 mile ride.

    I ride 12-15 hours a week, but was stuck on weight since I eat a lot. Started weight watchers online 1 month ago...down 20lbs....measure/monitor your calories, it helps. Its a bit of work, but its worth it if you really want to drop the lbs.
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  13. #13
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    Lots of great advice here. Food intake is definitely your problem. You may think your normal diet is just fine, but you'd be amazed how much we all eat. Most of us eat way too much and have no clue that we eat too much. I've lost way more doing weight watchers than exercise, but it takes work to keep up with it. Of course, proper diet and exercise together are the ultimate way to go. I've dropped about 16 pounds in just over 5 weeks and I have only exercised once a week over that time period. MN winters tend to make me lazy. Once I do finally start exercising it will be so much easier with the weight gone first. I've learned portion control, what to eat, and how to shop through weight watchers and you'd be amazed how bad most food is. It doesn't take long to get used to eating less, and once you hit that, it's easier to eat smaller portions and you actually don't want to eat a ton anymore. Learn how to actually count what you are eating and then figure out what you need to eat every day and stick with that and you will be fine!

    P.S. I've never been able to lose a ton bike riding. I can lose a lot running, but bike riding just doesn't do that much for me, that's why I combine it with other exercise and a proper diet.

  14. #14
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    If you have an iphone or ipod touch downloaded the FREE app "LoseIt" I got this app about 2 weeks ago and have dropped about 4 pounds without any real exercise yet due to cruddy weather. Basically you tell it how much you weigh, how much you want to weigh, how tall you are and how old you are, and how much you want to lose per week (maintain weight, .5, 1, 1.5, or 2 pounds) and it gives you a target calorie intake and tells you how long it should take. By the beginning of April I should be able to reach my non-clyde goal of 199 lbs. After that, when I'm able to ride more, I'll reset my goal to 185 lbs. and hopefully get back to my pre-college weight!

    The app has a huge database of foods that you can search and enter in as you eat throughout the day. You can also enter any food that isn't there or add your favorite recipes. I've NEVER counted calories before, but this makes it easy and actually sort of fun. There's a graph that shows how many calories you have left that day and what your surplus/deficit for the week is so far. It's always in my pocket and almost any food that isn't in the database I can look up online.

    I never knew how much I actually ate. I'd think, "gee, these frosted flakes only have 120Calories, that's not too bad." But then I'd fill up one of our bowls not realizing that I just poured out 3 servings worth! Since I'm entering everything in now I actually measure stuff when I can and I'm starting to be aware of what real portions are and am trying to adjust to that. I never liked diet Coke much before, but now I can't afford to spend my precious calories on something that will leave me hungry so I skip the real stuff most of the time. Funny thing is, when you eat smaller portions everything seems to taste better. I like diet soda now and have transitioned to light miracle whip and ranch dressing without even noticing a difference.

    Oh, and there's a place where you can enter exercise too! If you go biking you can tell it your average speed and distance (or just select "mountain biking" and distance) and it subtracts those calories from your total consumed that day.

    Great great app for FREE!
    Last edited by everyxnewxday; 02-12-2009 at 10:16 PM.

  15. #15
    local trails rider
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    Food...

    There's fats and sugar (energy) in pretty surprising places. Take a look at the small print on the packages and see what is in it.

  16. #16
    Stray Bullet
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    Less carbs...see all that fat around your midsection. That is from excess carbs in your diet. Want to get rid of it? Starting eating fat and protein.

    Fat won't make you fat. Anyone that says it will is stuck in the 1990's.

    The 'fat' burning heart rate zone is passe too. You're way better off doing super hard intervals (30 secs on 2:00 mins off, repeat 8 times). You'll lose more weight, gain muscle, and feel better.

  17. #17
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    When you first start exercising you also can get stalled by replacing fat with muscle tissue. Muscle weight more than fat, and if you were really out of shape you can delay your progress on the scales if you're putting on a lot of muscle.

    As already mentioned, if you need to see results use a tape.

    Are you at least feeling better and having more energy? Maybe noticing more tone?

    There are other benefits to exercise than weight loss.

  18. #18
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    Well to be honest start counting your calories and I guarantee you will loose weight. 1 You could be over eating 2 you could be under eating. Figure out your BMR/RMR and you activity level and go from there. Don't worry so much about carbs you just have to know which ones are the good carbs and when to eat them. Drink loads of water everyday !!! This will make you feel full and less chances snacking to much. Also cut out soda , beer or any other empty calories. Fruits , veggies, protein , good fat will help balance things out. Most important is get a ball park on how much you body needs daily just to survive and go from there. On line calculator give a nice ball park where you should be and you just start tinkering with the numbers

  19. #19
    Pedaler of dirt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Divo25
    ok started riding about a month ago. roughly 5.4 miles of daily commute and the 7 mile trail ride once every weekend. and yet ive lost nothing. eating hasnt changed much and stayed bout the same but i thought that biking would show results. am i being impatient or am i missing something ?
    Ride further and longer. 5.4 and 7 mile rides isn't going to do much for weight loss. Do either of these rides take more than an hour for you?

    Aim for at least an 90 minute ride on the weekend, don't forget some water and don't eat any extra food before or after the ride, you don't need it.
    It's not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required.

  20. #20
    Stray Bullet
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    On your 7 mile trail ride....set the timer on your watch to go off every 2 minutes. When the alarm goes off stop and do 10 pushups as fast as possible.

    Or spend the 7 miles pedaling as hard as you can. Same with our commute. If you're worried about showing up to work sweaty then on the way home plot a longer hilly route and pin it.

    It is all about intensity.

    Measure your waist and toss the scale. How much you weigh is meaningless.

  21. #21
    Pedaler of dirt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nagaredama

    Measure your waist and toss the scale. How much you weigh is meaningless.
    +1 to ignoring the scales. 2007 I began hitting the gym really hard, lost 3" off my waist, gained over an 1" on my chest, weight never changed.
    It's not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required.

  22. #22
    I Tried Them ALL... Moderator
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    Yup...screw the scale. That's old hat, and no longer a gauge of weight loss progress. My waist went from size 38 to size 31...and as that Bowflex dork said, " I gave all my fat clothes to all my fat friends"...I just donated the loose clothing to charitable causes, instead.

    TOTAL CALORIES....is truly what matters. Burn more, and eat half of what you normally do, each day...and the clothing will fall off you too. Weight loss is a ridiculously simple concept- but extremely difficult to execute.
    "The mind will quit....well before the body does"

  23. #23
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    A few points .

    Don't get discouraged about not losing weight. New evidence shows that the standard guidelines for body mass index fails to peoperly account for an entire category of people who might be described as fat and fit. Focus on getting fit and the weight will take care of itself.

    While all excercise beats nothing, you get a bonus on sessions of over 30 minutes in length. After 30 minutes the body stays in a "excercise mode" and you'll continue to burn calories at an increased rate for a while longer. How much longer depends on the excercise level. Here are a few hints.

    If your commute is too short, try to add miles on the ride home, you might also look for a few hills to raise your level of effort.

    Excercise alone is a poor way for unfit people to lose weight. Muscle weighs more than fat, and you'll be building muscle faster than you lose weight. Try to modify your eating habits, but do it only slightly or you'll get discouraged. Just try to cut down on some of the empty calories here and there.

    Here are a few ways to better register your progress from fat to fit.

    Measure your waist, since there's good evidence that waist fat is the most unhealthy.

    Record your time and pulse after each identical session. If you're getting more fit, either your pulse or your time will drop.

    Check your body fat level with the old pinch an inch test.

    Run up stairs and note how far you can go before either you get winded, or your legs get rubbery, whicher happens first.

    Lastly, if you have access to a swimming pool, measure your specific gravity by seeing how high you float when perfectly still (lower is better, because fat floats and muscle sinks), or how much air you have to let out of your lungs to sink.

    By refocusing your goals, and using better ways to monitor progress, you'll see more progress and be encouraged to continue your program. Good luck.
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  24. #24
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    Actually in weight loss you loose muscle which is why doing some kind of weight training is good cause it will help maintain muscle loss. Yes you build muscle but you will also loose muscle in the process

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hellrazor666
    Actually in weight loss you loose muscle which is why doing some kind of weight training is good cause it will help maintain muscle loss. Yes you build muscle but you will also loose muscle in the process

    all of that depends on your calorie intake ...

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