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  1. #1
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    New Clydesdale rider with a question!

    Hello guys. I'm new to the bike scene and I'm a pretty big clydesdale (6'1" 360) trying to pick the right bike. I'm hoping you fellow clydes could point me in the right direction.

    ATM I think I have it narrowed down to 2 bikes. 2014 Cannondale Trail 4(29er) or a 2014 Felt NINE 60. They are both in my price range and would prefer not to spend more. I plan on riding on pavement till i get used to riding a bike again (been 15 years since i have rode one) and losing some weight before I tryout trails. So I figured that these 2 bikes would be good for that transition when it comes.

    Please and thank you for all of your help in advance.

    Thanks,
    Bigdirty

  2. #2
    thread killer
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    It's going to come down to what you feel comfortable on. Go and test ride them. The other thing you should consider is what does your LBS have on hand? If you buy a bike on the bay/C-list your LBS isn't going to give you the same support as for a bike you buy from them.
    next time

    [QUOTE=spazzy] Might as well sell your bikes, E-riding is much more productive.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the reply WTF-IDK. I should I have said that I went to my local bike shop and they carry both and I rode both of them as well. They feel the same to me. I guess I am mainly asking to get other peoples opinions on them if you guys have an opinion on them.

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Riding bikes since 1976
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    Between the Cannondale and Felt. The Felt is a little better because of the RS fork alone. Though both would need wheel set and crank/BB set upgrades right off the bat.
    Wheelset, crank/BB set, and fork are the parts you need to consider most at 360lbs.

    But for less then either of those bikes, and with far better components...
    Save up to 60% off new Mountain Bikes - MTB - Motobecane Fantom 29Elite
    or
    try to spend a little more and get...Airborne Bicycles. Goblin
    Both of these will carry your current weight better, and still be running well in a year. Both have good starting point wheelsets and stronger forks to take your street riding weight loss and still perform on the trail later. With drivetrains that will last far longer.

    You might even think about getting this...
    Airborne Bicycles. Seeker
    and upgrade the wheelset for 150 or $200

    You wouldnt get the free tune up that (usually) comes with a purchase at the LBS. But owell. Pay the LBS $50 to put together, double check lubrication, adjust the drivetrain if need be, and check the tension of the wheels. Then give them $50 more in 2 months to tune up bike.

    Any one of those 3 routes(bikes) would be better then spending $1050 on the Felt. IMO

    And by the way. A clydesdale worthy wheel set such as SunRingle MTX 33 rims with straight gauge spokes, brass nipples, and basic Deore hubs can be had for $150 plus shipping. I weight 275lbs. and ride this wheel set hard, no problems.

  5. #5
    No talent hack
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    Sorry to say this, but no $150-200 wheel set is going to stand up to clyde abuse.

    WTF hit it on the head. Go ride them both. Talk to your shop and see what they say. make sure your shop is going to stand behind you. Buy a bike and ride the wheels off of it. The only thing I would change is to buy a bike with a fork that has an air spring instead of a metal coil... the metal coil is not going to be strong enough for your weight.... air lets you set the spring rate easier than swapping a coil.

    As for upgrades, don't worry about them. Get the bike. Start riding. Make diet changes. Start losing weight. As you break things (and you will, all us clydes break things), replace and upgrade then. It is very unlikely you will need stronger wheels just for pavement riding. When I started riding at 325 2 years ago on pavement, I was running a lightweight set of Rolf Dolomite wheels and never had a problem with them on road. Off road, you will have issues, but worry about that when you start riding off road and have a bit more money saved up.

    If you are going to ride strictly on pavement, the only thing I would change are the tires. Get a set of tires without the knobbies (just normal road type slicks) and get on the bike and ride. The tires are COMPLETELY optional though.

    Have I mentioned the importance of just riding? Yeah... don't sweat the details to the point that you prevent yourself from acting...
    Fat guys need bikes too.

  6. #6
    Riding bikes since 1976
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    Sorry to say this, but no $150-200 wheel set is going to stand up to clyde abuse.
    Running these on my street(lots of steps and curbs)/winter bike...
    BlueSkyCycling.com - Shimano Deore M525 29er Disc Wheelset w/ Sun MTX 33 Rims
    These are still stronger then the ones stock on the Cannondale or Felt. By far.

    And I have Mtx 33(Stellar to all users, over more then a few forums), straight gauge silvers, with silver brass 12mm nips, laced 4x (add note to order for 4X lacing), to Deore hubs(simple but maintainable bearings) on my AM bike...
    Universal Cycles -- Custom Wheelset Builder, takes 5 minutes,.

    So I misspoke, $150 plus shipping to $234 plus shipping. Sure he could build a set with cheaper Alex rims, 36 spoke 4X lacing, for $180 plus shipping.



    The 2 bikes the OP has named, the Cannondale and Felt. That he has already stated he rode, and ride about the same. Are not going to last under his current weight, even street riding. Because they have low level components where it counts.

    Why not look at other bikes at that price point that have better initial component sets that are less likely to break, and last a heck of a lot longer, statistically speaking. And have far better forks. Experience speaking. Did I mention wheel-sets?

    What will keep him from riding more? A bike that is in and out of the LBS for repairs/replacement of low level("how unclydesdale of you !") parts.

    lol
    Last edited by Gear Head; 12-13-2013 at 01:32 AM.

  7. #7
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    I started about 30lbs less than you on a box stock redline d440... rigid 29er... was a very good bike for the price but wasn't the best fit... I went to a surly karate monkey (again rigid) and went on to beat the snot out of that thing.

    if you're sticking to the streets do yourself a favor and skip a suspension fork for now... if the bike has 32 spoke wheels and you get them properly tensioned by the shop they should last for a good long while at least on the street... on the trail things can change

    again... the crankset and BB bits can take a lot of abuse even if old school square taper stuff... especially if you are sticking to the road and sit and spin over stand and mash which again is much easier to do on the road.

    with that being said... after looking at those bikes you've posted I'd suggest looking for a 80/90's rigid bike, get your fitness up and your weight down and while you do save your pennies for that awesome new shiny MTB to hit the hardcore trails on

    just my take
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  8. #8
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    More than likely you are going to need wheels, I run MTX 33's rims and for the money most people believe they cannot be beat. Bens Cycle in Milwaukee is great on wheel deals on these.

    I have had 2 new bikes in the last 3 years and the stock wheels on both collapsed.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knight511 View Post
    Sorry to say this, but no $150-200 wheel set is going to stand up to clyde abuse.

    WTF hit it on the head. Go ride them both. Talk to your shop and see what they say. make sure your shop is going to stand behind you. Buy a bike and ride the wheels off of it. The only thing I would change is to buy a bike with a fork that has an air spring instead of a metal coil... the metal coil is not going to be strong enough for your weight.... air lets you set the spring rate easier than swapping a coil.

    As for upgrades, don't worry about them. Get the bike. Start riding. Make diet changes. Start losing weight. As you break things (and you will, all us clydes break things), replace and upgrade then. It is very unlikely you will need stronger wheels just for pavement riding. When I started riding at 325 2 years ago on pavement, I was running a lightweight set of Rolf Dolomite wheels and never had a problem with them on road. Off road, you will have issues, but worry about that when you start riding off road and have a bit more money saved up.

    If you are going to ride strictly on pavement, the only thing I would change are the tires. Get a set of tires without the knobbies (just normal road type slicks) and get on the bike and ride. The tires are COMPLETELY optional though.

    Have I mentioned the importance of just riding? Yeah... don't sweat the details to the point that you prevent yourself from acting...
    Great advice!! Just ride!!! Either one is a great option.. If you got Redline around you they have some great 29er options too..

    Any entry level bike is almost the same.. only so much you can squeeze into a $700-1000 bikes.. Just ride!!

    Where do you live? What kind of trails do you have?

    Find a group of guys and get some no drop rides in. It's great for motivation to have a group of nice guys to ride with.. They will help you fix a flat or chainlink..

    The commradery is what really makes you wanna pound miles.. the street is boring IMHO.

  10. #10
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    Donalson brings up a very valid point... a full rigid bike is most likely going to serve you better. With a bike like the Surley Karate Monkey, you can get riding without the front shock on the pavement and you won't have the problems of the shock failing. A cheap shock just isn't going to be happy under the weight. Then once you lose some weight and start looking off road you can replace the rigid with a fork. Or even, replace the OEM fork with a rigid fork (should be under $100) and start riding like that.

    I will say it again... there is no reason for you to buy a bike and replace parts before you walk out of the store. Buy the bike and just be aware that you may break stuff and it may need to be replaced. I road my old bike (a 1999 Trek STP200) for MANY years without breaking a thing. From the OEM square taper bottom bracket all the way to the wheels. Once I started riding more aggressively off road, I had to replace the wheels.... but NEVER before then. I never even had to true the stock wheels while riding on the road. The Dolomites were very weak and had very few spokes:



    Find some riding buddies to hook up with and just ride... the rest will come as you go.

    If you happen to be in the North Texas area, hit me up with a PM. I am always happy to show folks around at a more relaxed pace. We all started some where.
    Fat guys need bikes too.

  11. #11
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    with that i'll also add... if you learn to ride decently offroad on a rigid you're going to be a better rider in the long term... you'll also learn how important tire pressure is, how to ride "light" and learn how to pick a line better...

    of my over decade of riding rigid I can only recall one time in one section getting a bit nervous due to lack of control... it was the bottom of an occasionally swampy area that had lots of exposed roots... I was going much faster that day than usual and just felt like I didn't have the control I wanted due to all the chatter... when I went to a suspension fork I did end being a bit quicker though those sorts of sections... but for the most part I didn't notice a huge difference, I'd learned to absorb shock with my legs and arms... but I wouldn't bother with the cheap crap forks on many bikes in that price range :-/...

    that being said... come early spring I've been thinking about another MTB... i've got my eye on this guy
    On-One Inbred 29 Sram X5 Mountain Bike it's a little over your price point but I've had good luck with the sram x5 stuff, the 15mm qr front wheel should keep the steering nice and stiff, i've had good luck with rock shox 100mm even at my 300ish lbs in the past also (did require a bit to high of pressure for my taste at 80mm)... overall it looks like it's the newer version of the tora 318 soloair 29er g2 that I loved on my karate monkey I upgraded to back in the day but with a lighter alloy steerer tube instead of steel... in the end even back when I had my karate monkey I always thought an inbred would be a nice bike to try out lol...
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  12. #12
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    Keep it simple, buy something inexpensive for the road, maybe used if possible.
    Then, if you are still interested, consider a nice bike for the trail. Rigid, HT or FS for the trail….really depends on you and your trails. I like to go fast over all terrain…..my body can't handle the beat-up, so it's only FS bikes for me.

  13. #13
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    Wow guys thank you so much for all of the input and advice. I'm going to try and take in all of this information and make the right decision lol. Thanks again guys I really appreciate it.

  14. #14
    Riding bikes since 1976
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    On-One Inbred 29 Sram X5 Mountain Bike


    Nice bike. Didnt think to look for a steel HT at that price point.
    You just added a 3rd bike to my short list.

    Hey BIGDIRTYTEX, maybe you could post your decision on bike. And an initial ride report in the Clydesdale forum. Plenty of people would be interested.

  15. #15
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    Gear Head thanks for the suggestion on another bike. I will look into it as well. And I will definitely post my final decision and how it goes.

    Thanks

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