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  1. #1
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    new clyde looking for a solid clyde bike

    Hello fellow clydes,

    I have been searching for a good clyde bike for about 5 months, I have ridden a bunch of bikes and enjoyed the Jamis dakota xc. I will mainly be ridding on asphalt and packed trails thru the week, "I can sneak out of the office and ride for an hour at lunch" but on the weekends I would like to hit the trails a little more aggressively.

    I have been to a few LBS to check out similar products to the Jamis I liked but the information seems overwhelming. I just want to a bike that will handle my size, 5'8 240, and my love of exercising, especially bike riding.
    I would like to keep the cost under 1500 if possible.

    Any help or suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Never ridden the Jamis, but I love my Kona Hoss Delux. Designed for clydes. Slacker geometry than the Jamis making it a bit more stable in technical sections and downhill.

    http://www.konaworld.com/shopping_ca...9&parentid=253

  3. #3
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    If the Jamis Dakota XC is your favorite after trying a number of different bikes, then that's probably the one you should get. It is light for a Clyde though (espeically if you want to get agressive), so I would contact Jamis and ask if the bike is a good fit for you or if there are parts you need to watch out for.

    Personally, I would probably go for something beefed up a little more -- but then again I never know what kind of trail I'm going to end up on. and I'm bigger than you. Make sure you get something you can have some fun on so you keep at it.

    How aggressive do you plan on getting?

    Quote Originally Posted by maceio
    Hello fellow clydes,

    I have been searching for a good clyde bike for about 5 months, I have ridden a bunch of bikes and enjoyed the Jamis dakota xc. I will mainly be ridding on asphalt and packed trails thru the week, "I can sneak out of the office and ride for an hour at lunch" but on the weekends I would like to hit the trails a little more aggressively.

    I have been to a few LBS to check out similar products to the Jamis I liked but the information seems overwhelming. I just want to a bike that will handle my size, 5'8 240, and my love of exercising, especially bike riding.
    I would like to keep the cost under 1500 if possible.

    Any help or suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

  4. #4
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    I rode the hoss but I didn't like the feel of the forks, the LBS didnt have a deluxe in stock. How are the componets on the deluxe? Have you ridden the explosif?

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the tip about contacting Jamis, i will give them a call. Out of curiosity, how beefy are you talking, any suggestions.

    I plan on getting pretty aggressive, eventually. I am coming off of two knee surgeries, both from biking accidents. One was major, the other was just a miniscus tear but an infection hindered my recovery.

    I am not married to the idea of a Jamis, just liked the bike over the others that the lbs was pushing, I got the feeling the shops were not listening to me just trying to sell to me

  6. #6
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    rode the hoss but I didn't like the feel of the forks, the LBS didnt have a deluxe in stock. How are the componets on the deluxe? Have you ridden the explosif?
    Your'e right about the fork. The DirtJam Pro on the Delux is a bit better than the regular Hoss but still nothing too special. Components on my Delux are holding up pretty well. Had to replace the bottom bracket and seat. The frame is the best part of the bike, built super tough and upgradeable. Maybe you can talk your LBS into throwing on a better fork before it leaves the store?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryando
    Your'e right about the fork. The DirtJam Pro on the Delux is a bit better than the regular Hoss but still nothing too special. Components on my Delux are holding up pretty well. Had to replace the bottom bracket and seat. The frame is the best part of the bike, built super tough and upgradeable. Maybe you can talk your LBS into throwing on a better fork before it leaves the store?
    I will speak with them about it but the lbs i went to said they are getting the new 07s in soon so they are only ordering the 06 and 05.

    How about used bikes? Are they worth the purchase?

    Any suggestions.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by maceio
    Thanks for the tip about contacting Jamis, i will give them a call. Out of curiosity, how beefy are you talking, any suggestions.

    I plan on getting pretty aggressive, eventually. I am coming off of two knee surgeries, both from biking accidents. One was major, the other was just a miniscus tear but an infection hindered my recovery.

    I am not married to the idea of a Jamis, just liked the bike over the others that the lbs was pushing, I got the feeling the shops were not listening to me just trying to sell to me
    What do you concider agressive? In any case, I would recommend "All Mountain" types for Clydes (and anyone looking for a first bike too). Let's face it, you're not going to win any XC races, so I think it's pointless for you to get something geard toward cross country since you want to get really agressive. Get something with a heavy duty build that allows you to have fun while getting a good workout -- this fits the All Mountain category perfectly. The bike may be a little heavier, but it's not going to be in the shop as much and a few extra pounds on the bike won't make much of a difference to someone in the Clyde category. Plus, All Mountain bikes still peddal well.

  9. #9
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    Warranty

    If you do a lot of riding, there's an almost certain chance that something on your bike will break. Don't worry so much about things like drivetrain components; just view a broken component as a opportunity to upgrade. You should, however, be very concerned about the frame.

    So... one of the things that you should consider in your bike search is the warranty. Look for a frame warranty of five years or better. A one year warranty on the bike's components is typical, but as stated earlier, don't be so worried about that. Try to find out about the manufacturer's reputation with honoring their warranties. (Check the manufacturer's forum on this site to see what warranty experiences are like.) If you're buying from an LBS, find out ahead of time what the LBS will charge to handle a warranty for you and try to get some anecdotal evidence that they do a good job of handling their warranty work.

  10. #10
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    Avoiding pedal bob?

    I have a similar dilemma. I am a similar size. About a year ago against some better advice I bought a Trek Fuel EX7. It is a great bike and I still plan to “work into it” on some more single track riding but the reality is that I have only ridden a few times. My daily rides include a long gravel drive and then 13 miles of paved road with some pretty good hills. The FS bike just has not worked out because of pedal bob on the long paved hills. Now looking again at a Trek 6500, but I don't want to wind up with another expensive bike in the barn because of pedal bob. I have only ridden mountain type bikes for 10 years and I really don’t want to go to a road bike, besides the long gravel drive with ups and downs is probably not the best mix for a road bike. Will a hard tail with front suspension still give me heavy pedal bob on paved road hills? If I could be sure of the right mix in the new bike for paved roads and some single track I might consider trading the EX7.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by roomax
    Will a hard tail with front suspension still give me heavy pedal bob on paved road hills?
    No pedal bob with a hard tail. But, depending upon your technique, if you pedal out of the saddle while going uphill, there may be some fork movement. You might consider a fork with lockout if that's a real problem.

    There are several full suspension designs that aren't as prone to pedal bob, DW-Link and VPP being two of them. However, from your description of the terrain you ride, it sounds like a hard tail is the way to go. For your purposes a hard tail will be more efficient, cheaper, and easier to maintain.
    Last edited by KevinB; 08-08-2006 at 03:46 AM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by roomax
    I have a similar dilemma. I am a similar size. About a year ago against some better advice I bought a Trek Fuel EX7. It is a great bike and I still plan to “work into it” on some more single track riding but the reality is that I have only ridden a few times. My daily rides include a long gravel drive and then 13 miles of paved road with some pretty good hills. The FS bike just has not worked out because of pedal bob on the long paved hills. Now looking again at a Trek 6500, but I don't want to wind up with another expensive bike in the barn because of pedal bob. I have only ridden mountain type bikes for 10 years and I really don’t want to go to a road bike, besides the long gravel drive with ups and downs is probably not the best mix for a road bike. Will a hard tail with front suspension still give me heavy pedal bob on paved road hills? If I could be sure of the right mix in the new bike for paved roads and some single track I might consider trading the EX7.

    The cheaper full suspension bikes may suffer from peddal bob, but there isn't even a hint of it on my Schwinn Rocket Pro with the ISO Drive suspension system (Schwinn's ISO Drive is related to GTI's I-Drive -- both companies are owned by the same parrent company). The system works very well over any type of terrain (including pavement), and the bike's handling is impressive. There's no excuse for peddal bob on a full suspension bike anymore (with the exception of downhill bikes), and even poor suspension designs will bennefit from better shocks designed to resist it.

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