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  1. #1
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    New Clyde checking in.

    First off I would like to apologize if I have posted my introduction in the wrong section, please feel free to move this thread if needed. Thank you.

    Here is a quick run down to get an idea of what I am working with budget wise and how / where I ride.

    My name is Russ, I'm 23 and married with 2 daughters. (2 1/2 and 4 months.) I'm in phone sales, and I deal a lot with car mechanics on the side.

    - 6'2
    - 265-270 depending on the day.

    I haven't ridden a bike in 10 years up until about 3 weeks ago. I did a little research on 29er's after riding a friend's bike and decided that was the way I wanted to go. I only had a budget of around $600 for the bike so I shopped around on Amazon, Craigslist and then I found a local bike shop and I fell in love with a Niner that was WAY out of my budget. They guided me towards a Scott Aspect 940 which for my budget seemed perfect. After a few test rides and going back and forth in my head with whether or not I REALLY wanted to make this a hobby, I finally decided to pick it up! - Note: Saving up for that NINER on the side! Haha

    First thing I noticed after about 5 miles of trail riding locally, the seat had to go. I stopped in and they directed me towards a larger seat with a nice gel feel. (I'll get the name tomorrow, it has made a world of difference.) They even bought back my stock seat. SCORE!

    I also noticed after a couple days that the grips were starting to irritate my hands. (I ride glove-less currently.) They told me to try out some ESI Foam Grips, which they installed and if I didn't like them to bring them back. After another ride I was sold, told them I liked them and they simply said you're welcome. NO CHARGE!

    Now, to the real reason I am here... I have bent my front wheel twice and my rear wheel three times, the third being the finisher where they actually had to install a new wheel because it was too far gone to be trued. What should I do? I need wheels that will support my weight, that are not going to kill the bank. I am far from cheap but I do have a budget that I have to follow if I want to live.

    Any opinions on my setup or where I should go next are definitely welcomed and I would love to hear from you guys!

    Thanks in advance!

    - Russ

    Here are some pictures of my bike, myself and a couple trail shots.











    I do not normally slouch like this, as mentioned before I haven't ridden in years and I literally got my ass kicked out there this day.




  2. #2
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    Here is a video I shot a few days ago riding the "Easy" trails with my little brother, he has a hard time with it.

    Loyce Harpe Park - Edit (Carter Rd.) 7/8/13 - YouTube

  3. #3
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    Unfortunately at the price point of the bike, the wheels are not going to be the best ones out there. I was also bending all sorts of stuff out there, so I feel your pain. I personally always had good luck with Sun Ringle wheels and DT Swiss wheels. Perhaps the Sun Chargers? Also Velocity wheels are known to be strong too, but I've never ridden them. Strong wheels aren't too expensive, can get for $500 or so if you try hard enough. Hope this is somewhat helpful. Welcome to the sport. Most fun thing there is.
    “Think of bicycles as rideable art that can just about save the world.”
-Grant Petersen

  4. #4
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    Good wheels are expensive but the great thing is that they last and can transfer from bike to bike. My current wheel set is on their third frame and holding strong. I rode them from 320 pounds to my current 263 pounds. Expect to pay $500+. See if your shop has a wheel builder or can recommend one local. That will save you a lot in shipping. If not, check out Mike Curiak at Lace Mine 29 (goes by mikesee on here) as he's the 29er wheel building guru or I have a guy that specializes in building clyde wheels. He can hook you up and ship the wheels to you. I'd look at something with 36 spokes, for the rear at least and a good hub like a Hope, DT Swiss, or Chris King. Hope is the least expensive of the bunch and very nice, IMO they are the best bang for the buck. Chris King is, well, the King of hubs and the DT Swiss fall in between. There's others as well, but these three seem to be the more popular choices. Also, make sure you're riding correctly. Learn to ride light. That is take some weight off the wheels when you are about to hit an obstacle. Even at 320 pounds on cheap stock rims riding some narly roots and rocks, I've never busted a wheel.

  5. #5
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    First off, Welcome and enjoy your stay!

    I wouldn't think at you weight you would be making a taco out of your rim. I'm 345 pounds @ 6'3 and i have yet to bend a rim. Now mind you, I don't do any drops or anything of the sort. Just trail riding, sometimes going over rocks in the path.

    How do you ride?

    Also sent you a message with some rims.

  6. #6
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    If it was just your rim that bent, and the hub is still ok (which I'd guess is the case) you can re-use the hub and save most of the cost of a new wheel.

    It's the wheel build that's usually the problem in wheel strength; a strong rim will still fold if the spokes aren't properly tensioned, and unfortunately on complete bikes, that just happens sometimes.

    Have the shop (or ask around for a good local wheelbuilder) re-use your hub with a stans flow and whatever spokes, you'll have a new wheel for under $200.

  7. #7
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    On wiggle.com you can get 29er stans flows laced with hope pro 2 hubs for $382. Very hard to beat that deal.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 208Ryder View Post
    First off, Welcome and enjoy your stay!

    I wouldn't think at you weight you would be making a taco out of your rim. I'm 345 pounds @ 6'3 and i have yet to bend a rim. Now mind you, I don't do any drops or anything of the sort. Just trail riding, sometimes going over rocks in the path.

    How do you ride?

    Also sent you a message with some rims.
    Thank you very much!

    I haven't taco'd a wheel yet lol but they said it was too far to true. They also replaced the wheel with a stock wheel for free so I didn't complain. I would say I ride aggressively for my size and weight. I'm not afraid to jump things unless it's huge. I do not mind steep down hill if there is a straight runway at the end, not a fan of sharp curves. Lol, I hit roots all the time on the trails that I ride. I also do pretty decent drops. The video I posted doesn't show any of that because I am with my little brother but I will post up something of the harder trails soon!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    If it was just your rim that bent, and the hub is still ok (which I'd guess is the case) you can re-use the hub and save most of the cost of a new wheel.

    It's the wheel build that's usually the problem in wheel strength; a strong rim will still fold if the spokes aren't properly tensioned, and unfortunately on complete bikes, that just happens sometimes.

    Have the shop (or ask around for a good local wheelbuilder) re-use your hub with a stans flow and whatever spokes, you'll have a new wheel for under $200.
    I believe the rim was just bent but then again I wasn't there when they swapped everything out. Thank you for the advice though, I will look into it!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    Good wheels are expensive but the great thing is that they last and can transfer from bike to bike. My current wheel set is on their third frame and holding strong. I rode them from 320 pounds to my current 263 pounds. Expect to pay $500+. See if your shop has a wheel builder or can recommend one local. That will save you a lot in shipping. If not, check out Mike Curiak at Lace Mine 29 (goes by mikesee on here) as he's the 29er wheel building guru or I have a guy that specializes in building clyde wheels. He can hook you up and ship the wheels to you. I'd look at something with 36 spokes, for the rear at least and a good hub like a Hope, DT Swiss, or Chris King. Hope is the least expensive of the bunch and very nice, IMO they are the best bang for the buck. Chris King is, well, the King of hubs and the DT Swiss fall in between. There's others as well, but these three seem to be the more popular choices. Also, make sure you're riding correctly. Learn to ride light. That is take some weight off the wheels when you are about to hit an obstacle. Even at 320 pounds on cheap stock rims riding some narly roots and rocks, I've never busted a wheel.
    Have you heard anything about AC wheels? They said they would charge me $300ish for the set but the only down side is I would have to buy new brake disks to make them compatible. ($40 extra.)

  11. #11
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    You and I are the same height/weight. I bent the rear wheel on my hardtail a few times when I first started riding. There are a couple of things you can do to avoid it. First, check your rear tire pressure often, and keep it high -- in the 40 to 50 psi range. Second, work on your technique and "lighten" your weight on the rear wheel when you hit something hard. Also, you can get a bigger rear tire, something like a 2.2 or a 2.4 if it will fit your frame. It will give you extra air volume which will absorb a bit more impact before it can hit your rim.

    Foam grips might feel nice when you're starting out, but on longer rides, your hands and forearms might start to get tired. You need to squeeze them harder to keep a firm grasp on them, and that can make your muscles fatigue more quickly than riding with harder grips and gloves.

    Same with the saddle. Bigger, softer saddles feel good on short rides, but they can start rubbing you in uncomfortable places as you spend more time on them. Harder saddles with an ergonomic design, matched with some padded shorts, will keep you a lot more comfortable when you start riding more.

    Good luck.
    Justin
    Salt Lake City
    2012 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Comp 29
    2006 Specialized Allez Expert Double

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by authalic View Post
    Harder saddles with an ergonomic design, matched with some padded shorts, will keep you a lot more comfortable when you start riding more.

    Good luck.
    +1

    best thing i got was shorts..

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Russ_Steez View Post
    Have you heard anything about AC wheels? They said they would charge me $300ish for the set but the only down side is I would have to buy new brake disks to make them compatible. ($40 extra.)
    Never heard of them. I run Sun-Ringle MTx33 rims. They are bombproof. They run about $60 per rim. Spokes another $40. Labor to build, $30. Hub, depends...but you're looking at about $150 for a Hope front and $200ish for a Hope rear. So you're looking at about $600 for a bombproof set of wheels. Of course you can probably source out parts for less, maybe check out the deal on Wiggle with the Stan Flow rims which are really good clyde rims too. Key is to make sure they are hand built, not machine built like most stock wheels are.

    As far as your weight and drops and stock wheels on lower end bikes...not a good idea.

  14. #14
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    You need to learn to ride a bit smoother. If you want to wear a full face helmet and ride hard, you need to save up a lot more for a much stronger bike. If you get a normal bike helmet you'll not suffer so badly with the heat etc.
    As for the smoother riding - this is a cross country mountain bike and not a jump bike. Try to pick the lines you ride and not get so much time in the air - your size and a cheap-ish bike are not a good combination.
    Just watched your video - it is probably the camera angle, but looking further ahead on the trail will probably help smooth your ride. The further you look ahead, the easier it is.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooTallUK View Post
    You need to learn to ride a bit smoother. If you want to wear a full face helmet and ride hard, you need to save up a lot more for a much stronger bike. If you get a normal bike helmet you'll not suffer so badly with the heat etc.
    As for the smoother riding - this is a cross country mountain bike and not a jump bike. Try to pick the lines you ride and not get so much time in the air - your size and a cheap-ish bike are not a good combination.
    Just watched your video - it is probably the camera angle, but looking further ahead on the trail will probably help smooth your ride. The further you look ahead, the easier it is.

    I appreciate this input a lot, as for the helmet I chose a full face (dirt bike style) because I really don't like the idea of hitting my face on the ground or a tree. It's bad enough I'm fat, don't want to ruin my face. As for the jumping, I am trying to stay away from it but I love the rush that's the main reason I chose to ride again, I have been avoiding a lot of the jump since the last wheel bend.

    Oh and the camera, that's just the angle as you pointed out. I think I actually look too far ahead normally and that's why I pound the stumps, I seem to worry about turns and low lying tree branches than the bumps and stumps in the trail. I will keep that in mind.

    Thank you!

  16. #16
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    If you want to jump, then 270lbs + gravity = expensive bike! You need the right tools for the job and XC bikes, regardless of cost, are not designed for that.

    It is very hard to look too far ahead on a trail. If you are riding 'loose' enough (plenty flex in the arms, up out of the saddle for the rougher sections, knees bent, feet flat), then your body and the bike will work together to absorb most of the trail. Of course, some things take a bit more attention like bigger drop-offs etc, but once you relax into it you'll soak up much of the trail.

  17. #17
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    Yeah generally speaking, x type of bike does x, and y type of bike does y, but realistically all types of bikes do all types of riding if you really want. We all don't have the luxury of owning multiple bikes (I sure wish I could) so we gotta make the one bike do it all. I personally use a big travel heavier bike and do XC races. My friend used a Soecialized Epic for free riding. Change some parts and you'll be good. I think you have enough wheel suggestions to get yourself into trouble. Of course riding smoother never hurts too, but I'm not very smooth so I have no advice there.
    “Think of bicycles as rideable art that can just about save the world.”
-Grant Petersen

  18. #18
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    So, I bent another wheel and finally decided to try out a new wheel set. Let me know what you guys think.

    American Classic Terrain 29" Tubeless Wheelset with GEAX SAGUARO 29 Front tire, GEAX AKA 29 Rear tire. Shimano big brake upgrade in the front and adapter for the calipers!

    Leroy's Bikeworks hooked me up big time so a HUGE shout out to them.

    Rode them today with no issues yet and they are a night and day difference compared to the stock Alex Wheels I had on the bike.















    I think they make my "entry level" Scott look beefy. Lol



    Opinions and comments are always welcomed.

    Thanks!

  19. #19
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    Re: New Clyde checking in.

    First off welcome back to biking. Interesting enough your same build as me currently, I'm down from 360 last year. I ride a trek 29er.

    I saved myself ur pain of bent wheels somehow. I ride singletrack but i don't jump or anything crazy, I avoid black trails like the plague. I run into killing rear freehub bearings so i went budget and got Alex dp20 with slx 29er hubs. Tried a race yesturday for fun and i can't seem to hurt my wheels in the least.

    Good thing is to work on riding technique and if its anything rough take ur butt off the seat and use ur legs as dampers. And i run 2.2 tires to help out.

    Best of luck with getting back into riding, more u do it the more your going to love it!

    Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710e using Tapatalk 2
    Trek Marlin 29er

    Like It, Love It, Want Some More Of It!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    First off welcome back to biking. Interesting enough your same build as me currently, I'm down from 360 last year. I ride a trek 29er.

    I saved myself ur pain of bent wheels somehow. I ride singletrack but i don't jump or anything crazy, I avoid black trails like the plague. I run into killing rear freehub bearings so i went budget and got Alex dp20 with slx 29er hubs. Tried a race yesturday for fun and i can't seem to hurt my wheels in the least.

    Good thing is to work on riding technique and if its anything rough take ur butt off the seat and use ur legs as dampers. And i run 2.2 tires to help out.

    Best of luck with getting back into riding, more u do it the more your going to love it!

    Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710e using Tapatalk 2
    Thanks man!

    I noticed I was sitting a lot when I got worn out so I have learned to just stop if I feel like sitting, then move when I feel better. (Normally leg fatigue since I haven't ridden in a while.) I am slowly getting better. Riding rough stuff at times though so its hard to pay attention my posture and riding technique when I am worried about hitting a tree or falling in a swamp. Lol

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