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Thread: New to it all

  1. #1
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    New to it all

    I have recently decided to use cycling as a means to begin getting back into come kind of shape. I have looked at a Kona Mahuna,a Trek Shift, and a Trek Marlin. LBS says " don't worry, these bikes will do you just fine ( I'm 370 lbs.). Trek, by their own admission, says the most any of their bikes will hold is 300 lbs. ( with the exception of the Shift or the 820, I forget which ) will take 350 lbs. I am very eager to get started and feel that I could be talked into anything. Also interested in Specialized Rockhopper 29 and/or Hardrock Sportdisc 29. I will be on paved road or compacted gravel only. In addition, what is the best ( heavy duty ) 29er tire. 36 spoke rims? Any and all responses are truly appreciated.

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    I rode a RockHopper 29er in some pretty nasty terrain at as much as 320 pounds. It held up well. Wheels tended to go out of true, but that's to be expected. If you ride just roads or paths, even at 380#, I wouldn't worry much about the bike holding up. You should be just fine. If you were out in the woods really pound the bike, that might be a different story. Things you may find to be not great for your weight will be the saddle, saddle post, pedals, and possible the wheels. Saddles are often not appropriate regardless. It's important to be fitted for a saddle and get one that is the right size. Seat post, you want something that will hold up. Can't go wrong with something like a Thomson. Pedals, stock will suck. Search this section for some great ideas on heavy duty pedals. I personally use Time ATAC Aliums but those are clipless. Not sure if you're looking at something like that. They are bombproof though. Wheels, 36h will probably be your best bet. But more important is making sure spoke tension is right. Machine built wheels usually aren't. Maybe have a wheel builder go over the stock wheels and tune them up for you. That could help a lot. If you look at new wheels, I'd go with the 36h and make sure they are hand tensioned. I ride MTx33's, but there's several options and lots of threads about wheels in the clyde section. A quick search will give you loads of great info.

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    New to it all

    I'm about the same size as you. I started at 368 pounds, am now at 351. I ride a 26" bike that I built 12 years ago, with 32h wheels that were built 17 years ago. I've ridden exclusive on the road and packed gravel. Unless you are planning on doing serious offload riding stock 32h wheels should suffice. If you decide to start riding off road, then you may want to consider upgrading to 36h. In the mean time, ride as much as you feel comfortable with, then push yourself a little harder. Eat sensibly, and drink lots of water, and the weight will start to come off. Good luck on your journey!


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    thanks for the helpful info. At least now I don't feel like the LBS's were trying to pull one over on me completely. I mean, I know they want the buisness, but I need a quality "off the shelf" bike until I start learning on my own what exactly it is that I want or need in a bike.What about a tubless tire for a big guy ? Any benefit there ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dslfish View Post
    thanks for the helpful info. At least now I don't feel like the LBS's were trying to pull one over on me completely. I mean, I know they want the buisness, but I need a quality "off the shelf" bike until I start learning on my own what exactly it is that I want or need in a bike.What about a tubless tire for a big guy ? Any benefit there ?
    I'd say there is no real benefit to tubeless, unless you were here in Phoenix with all the cactus. If you are just on normal roads and gravel, no point in spending the extra on tubeless. It's slightly lighter, but not necessary.
    “Think of bicycles as rideable art that can just about save the world.”
-Grant Petersen

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