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  1. #1
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    Need advice. Do I upgrade or buy new?

    I'm looking to get back into riding again after a long absence. I have an old Gary Fischer Tassajara (99? 00? anyone know how to tell?) that is in decent shape but needs some work. I've gained a lot of weight since I stopped riding (currently 6'1 270) and need to know what I should do to the bike to make it handle me on a trail. I'll be riding all over the place in Colorado. I want a bike that can handle XC and riding the mountains. I don't plan on DH, but it could happen from time to time.

    The list of problems that I remember are:
    The seat tilts forward and back when riding, does this mean a new seat post is needed? (the current bracket is as tight as it can get)
    The rear brake drags. It's not a disk break setup. Is it possible to upgrade to disk breaks? I believe that the frame is setup to accept disk, how do I tell if the hubs are ready?
    The front derailer doesn't work very well and needs to be replaced.
    Lots of tuning is needed on the rear derailer.
    The wheels seem to be off balance. They wobble back and forth. (not a lot, but enough to be noticed)
    I am constantly getting flat tires and cutting the tubes even when riding on flat terrain. (Is this because of the rim?)
    Still has the original front shocks: never really like them.

    So far the list of stuff to buy is:
    New saddle (old one is dry rotting)
    new tires (Still has the originals on it)
    new tubes
    ?

    With all these problems and parts, I am wondering if it's worth it for me to fix the bike or if I should just sell it and buy a new one. I'm comfortable working on things myself, but have never done any work on bikes. How hard is it to learn?
    I'm looking to stay below 400$ or so if possible. (only payed 400 for the bike brand new)

    Thanks for the advice.

  2. #2
    Freelance Whatever
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    Upgrade...

    While a complete overhaul will address some of the issues, by the time you get done replacing/fixing/correcting the issues with the current ride, your out-of-pocket expense will be in the neighborhood of what a decent new bike will cost. Additionally, the changes that have occurred in part technology would mean that the bike you would get for the money would probably be a significant upgrade over the model you have now, IMHO

  3. #3
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    Trek fuel ex8 or 9 would be my first choice.I know that the Sandiego area Trek stores are having super good deals on 2008's and 2009's.
    I just got off of a ten year old bike and i tell you , it is like a whole new game.It is amazing how much better the newer bikes are.
    You can service yor bike for $400 and it would feel nice.But it is the same bike.same components.
    So like chowdownca say's try to get a newer bike,Maybe try for a good used newer bike.
    That is my opinion.
    TCSD
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  4. #4
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    I'm in agreement with chowdownca and gclark; unless you can do much of the work yourself, you should probably go new (or new to you via Craigslist).

    I recently purchased a new bike after many years out of MTBing. I, too, have gained a great deal of weight and, like you, I wanted to keep my costs low. I ended up purchasing a '08 Peace 9r Multi from Perfromance Bike for only $503.

    The Peace 9r is nothing fancy, but I'm very happy with my decision - other than the fact that I tried to do a wheelie while riding with clipless pedals for the first time. Not a wise choice on my part.
    Last edited by dog.gone; 04-17-2009 at 01:02 PM.

  5. #5
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    Sounds like I'm getting a new bike. I'll head to the LBS after this blizzard finishes. Thanks for the help guys.

    I'm very happy with my decision - other than the fact that I tried to do a wheelie while riding with clipless pedals for the first time. Not a wise choice on my part.
    Classic.

  6. #6
    Freelance Whatever
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    The other bonus of buying new..

    would be the warranty. Fisher is awesome when it comes to frame warranties, but what about the other parts? The shop that I work at offers lifetime adjustments if you are the original owner, so you wouldn't have too much to sweat if things start creakin' and squeakin', you can just drop on by and have the guys check it out. That's the first step in learning how to fix your own gear...asking questions!

  7. #7
    Mouth-Breather / Huffer
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrShortround
    Classic.
    Yeah, classic dumbsh!t move. I posted more about my 'experience' in another thread about beginners and clipless pedals:

    Went clipless for the first time yesterday

    Enjoy!

    Now, go out and get that new bike and ride, ride, ride!
    Last edited by dog.gone; 04-17-2009 at 01:00 PM.

  8. #8
    Freelance Whatever
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    It's a right of passage...You need to fall down in the most inconvenient place possible..intersections at rush hour, campus during class change, etc...Keeps the machismo in check..

  9. #9
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    $400 is pushing it with a new bike under a clyd... specifically things like the fork...

    1st... lets figure out exactly what year you have...
    2000 model year specs
    1999 model year specs

    either way... your bike as you know wasn't top of the line back but it's a fine bike even by todays standards... while the parts specs aren't great they work... and with your price i'd say you'd prob be better of working this bike up a bit and saving for a while longer (just a few hundred more would go a LONG way) then going out and blowing your entire budget on another entry level bike.

    lets start by addressing some of your problems...
    The seat tilts forward and back when riding, does this mean a new seat post is needed? (the current bracket is as tight as it can get)
    grab your seatpost and move it back and forth... if it moves tighten the clamp... my guess is the seat rails are loose on the seat itself... so you'll need a new saddle... your LBS prob has a few spare take offs laying around...

    The rear brake drags. It's not a disk break setup. Is it possible to upgrade to disk breaks?
    you should have V's on there... they are very simple to adjust park tools linear pull brake adjustment info


    I believe that the frame is setup to accept disk, how do I tell if the hubs are ready?
    your bike may well be disc ready... if it's the '99 model though it would use a different disc mount... I can't verify either way with out pics of the rear left side stays of your bike... but either way... if you want discs it would require the disc brakes AND a new wheel... in the name of budget and effectiveness i'd run (and personally do) run "mullet" which is disc up front and a V out back... your front stopper is the one that does most of the work... thats where you need it most


    The front derailer doesn't work very well and needs to be replaced.
    I seriously doubt it needs replaced... more then likely it just needs adjusted properly... adjusting front D's are known to be a "black art"... i'm still tweaking it on one of my bikes trying to get it to it's best shifting...
    front D adjustment info from park tools



    Lots of tuning is needed on the rear derailer.
    rear D adjustment info from park tools


    The wheels seem to be off balance. They wobble back and forth. (not a lot, but enough to be noticed)
    your wheels need "trued" i'm sure this also has a lot to do with your issues on the rear brakes... for this i'd take it to your LBS... but if you realy want to you could give your hand at this... the but if you do it wrong it'll mess up the wheels worse and your shop may charge even more to fix it... wheel and rim truing info from parks tools

    I am constantly getting flat tires and cutting the tubes even when riding on flat terrain. (Is this because of the rim?)
    whole mess of reasons this could be happening... can't realy help you unless you tell us where the punctures are happening on the tube... could be as simple as rim strips need replaced, could be to little pressure in the tube causing snake bites...

    Still has the original front shocks: never really like them.
    depending on what year the bike is depends on the fork... the '99 used a shorter travel 1.6" the '00 uses a more standard 3" travel fork... the 80mm (3") is still commonly used today... if you use the 80mm on the older 1.6 specyou are going to raise the front of your bike and it will steer a good bit slower... the cheapest way to go would be a rigid fork... your LBS may have one laying around the shop... or at least get you one cheap.



    So far the list of stuff to buy is:
    New saddle (old one is dry rotting)
    new tires (Still has the originals on it)
    new tubes
    of that list the tire is the only expensive part... and you can find good deals on them if you look... the new saddle will prob take care of your rocking saddle issue... you'll also prob want to replace your cables and housings...

    With all these problems and parts, I am wondering if it's worth it for me to fix the bike or if I should just sell it and buy a new one. I'm comfortable working on things myself, but have never done any work on bikes. How hard is it to learn?
    I'm looking to stay below 400$ or so if possible. (only payed 400 for the bike brand new)

    Thanks for the advice
    working on bikes is very simple... little adjustments do a lot... Park tools webpage is a great place for info on DIY repairs... we also have a tooltime/repair forum here on MTBR...

    so to recap... i say fix the bike spend only what you have to... save a bit longer and get yourself something better then your current budget allows...

    if you need any more help feel free to ask
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  10. #10
    Mouth-Breather / Huffer
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    Quote Originally Posted by donalson
    $400 is pushing it with a new bike under a clyd... specifically things like the fork...

    -snip-
    I should have explicitly stated that one of the key the reasons the GT Peace 9r Multi works well for me is that it came with a rigid front fork rather than a cheap suspension fork. While I gave up the comfort of suspension, it allowed me to get higher grade components at my pricepoint ($500) than what I could have hoped for otherwise.

    My apologies if I was misleading in some way.

  11. #11
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    I agree the GT peace would prob be a good ride with him (heck I want one)... the rigid fork was a big reason I went with the redline d440... parts spec isn't amazing but they are all good functional parts... the worst of em is prob those tektro mechanical discs... as your thread on it showed it's not a light weight bike... (neither is my redline) but the parts are fine for a clyde ... i'm SO tempted to sell my redline to snag one of those GT 9rs... i've got a thing for both blue (and the color is perfect) and a real sucker for a GT triple triangle

    the prob seems to be there are so many cheap POS 26er forks that they spec them with those instead of a rigid fork...
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

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