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  1. #1
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    Interesting question

    So, I was wondering, does a dual suspension put less, more, or the same stress on the rear wheel for clyde riders? I haven't really had a big problem with damaging my wheels, but I snapped a drive side rear spoke the other day just hopping a curb (to avoid a dip driver), and it got me thinking. I currently ride a hard tail, and while I couldn't afford another bike for a while, I was curious about it.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    I am going full sus for that exact reason.
    Having a part of the frame designed to dissapate force can only help.

    How long have you had that wheel, spoke snaps mainly relate to a poorly built wheel.
    What type of wheel was it?

    I use a well built ultra lightweight XC wheel, do drops on it and am 240lbs and havn't had a problem.

    having a wheel built propperly would fix your probs (depending on the type of riding you do) a super cheap fix would be to put a extra wide tire on.

  3. #3
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    In all fairness, the wheel is 7 years old, and has seen many hundreds of miles, it's been good to me. It's a ritchy ocr. It was really probably just time for something of the sort to happen, just bums me out, and got me thinking. I would gladly upgrade to new wheels and tires, if I could afford it. I am super strapped for money. I am waiting on word of a really good job, with much much better pay, and hopefully I will get it, then I can put some nice new wheels on this bike, prolly a new fork too, and probably shortly after get a full sus. to go with it. But that is hope, and yeah, not counting on it till it happens.

  4. #4
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    If a spoke is broken the wheel is probably quite unbalanced now and could be dangerous to cycle on. If that wheel spontaniously buckled at speed you could be quite hurt.
    That would lose you hours at work and could cost you more than getting it fixed.
    Get somone experienced to check out the wheel.
    search online and buy a new wheel.

    If you are upgrading that many components could be worth buying a whole new bike on credit. The offers you can get on last years stock are great, check out chainreactioncycles.com and the BeOne hornet, a bargain at full price.

  5. #5
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    Yes...

    technically an FS bike will put less stress on the rear wheel. But in most cases it ends up pretty much a wash. The FS bike allows the rider to hit a given trail in a more agressive manner and still maintain control. Basically you end up riding any given terrain more agressively than you would have on your hardtail. So the life span of a given set of wheels on a hardtail as opposed to an fs bike ends up about the same. 7 years is excellent longevity for a wheel set so you got your moneys worth out of them.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  6. #6
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    I would love to get new wheels, or even a new ride, but can't afford it, and credit is not an option, gotta love the ex wife who dragged my credit through the mud.

    I am not riding on the wheel until I get it fixed, or are you saying that because I broke a spoke that the wheel is compromised? I really hope not, because honestly, a family member is helping me out to get it fixed, and there is no chance I can afford a new wheel right now.

    As it is, I am going to be stuck on road for a while, woke up to my roomate's dog enjoying a snack of my recently replaced helmet. Oh what a wonderful life it is LOL.

  7. #7
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    If your friend knows how to build and check the wheel it should be fine.
    I was only worried that you might ride with a broken spoke.

  8. #8
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    Nah, not riding it on a broken spoke, and I will be taking it to a shop to get it fixed.

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