Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    207

    I know this is MTBR, but . . .

    What is to big for a road bike? Will skinny 700c's hold a clyde?

  2. #2
    56-year-old teenager
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,763
    Skinny tires? C'mon, this is MTBR. No need to go skinny just 'cause you're riding road.

    My commuter (Surly Long Haul Trucker) is 700C x 37 from the factory. You can get road (actually touring) tires up to at least 700C x 47, though you might have to look around and pay some extra money.

    Fat 700C tires are also known as "29ers". Rhyno Lite and other rims are available in 700C sizes.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  3. #3
    BIG and Bald
    Reputation: FireBallKY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    397
    I rode my Specialized Tricross at 370lbs. It also has a carbon fork. Never had any problems but I was extra cautious around bumps, cracks in the road and railroad tracks. Other than that, I didn't worry about the wheels at all. It will take you 3 or 4 good rides to get used to the skinnier tires/frame.
    [SIZE="2"][SIZE="3"]Eat to Live[/SIZE][/SIZE]...[SIZE="3"]not the other way around[/SIZE]

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Funrover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,539
    For years I have been on my Schwinn with 700 X 23C. I am current 275lbs. I would recomend touring wheels however.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dnlwthrn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,241
    Find an older steel framed bike (cheaper, usually) and run some nice 36 3x wheels. Find tires that can be run at high pressure (I'm running some Vredesteins with a 140psi max rating) and you should be fine.

  6. #6
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
    Reputation: donalson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,359
    some velocity deep V 36h 3x laced to a decent hub with some 28 or 32c tires you should be rolling fine... the clyd forum on one of the bike forums (primarly roadies) talk non stop about how strong the velocity deep V's are... they are heavy... but strong... if you go with the wider tire (which a clyd should) you could also get away with something like a delgado cross (what I use on my MTB without issue)

    problem is you'll need to get a frame that can fit wide tires... if going new touring or CX is the way to go... or go with an older steel road bike... my '92 trek will easily fit a 32c...

    here she is... as I got her...


    and how she shits now less the new ultegra triple crank (stock 52/42 crank wouldn't cut it for me climbing doh...


    also have a traditional wheelset that isn't pictured that stays on there most of the them... got about $300 into it as pictured (with both wheelsets)... so $350 with the new crankset... another frame/fork and I could almost build a 2nd bike... which I'm considering doh lol...
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  7. #7
    Underskilled
    Reputation: CaveGiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,109
    I use 1.8" tyre on my commuter, it gives me 1mm mud clearance, but it's a commuter, who cares?

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    184
    I bought a CX bike and replaced the 32mm CX tires with 28mm slicks.

    So far, so good.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dnlwthrn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,241
    Quote Originally Posted by donalson
    my '92 trek will easily fit a 32c...
    Looks a lot like the '89 trek 420 I have in my garage! (change the color a bit though)

    I cleaned it up and put new tires, bar and brake levers on it My dad paid $30 at Goodwill for it, so total invested is around $150. It worked well for 2 years, and then I built up another budget road bike.

  10. #10
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
    Reputation: donalson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,359
    ...wish we could find bikes for that kind of price here :-/... hipsters drive the price up like mad... also not easy finding a bike in the large sizes.
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    820
    Sure, they'll hold you, but why? I just don't like the way a 700x23 roadie feels. I actually got rid of mine, after putting several thousand miles on it. Fat tires are just so much more stable, and plush riding, you can relax, and not be nervous about your tires skittering out from under you because you crossed a little sand or gravel. There's this idiotic concept that if the racers do it, then we all gotta do it. Total nonsense. Your (and my) needs from a bike are way different than Lance's, and our bikes should reflect it. Get a cross, or (IMHO) get a 29'er, and enjoy the comfort and versatility. They'll work you just as hard, if not harder. Roadies are stoopid, unless you've really got to cover 100 miles in less than 6 hours.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dnlwthrn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,241
    Horses for courses, Doggity. I look at it like I do motorcycles: a DS is by far the most versatile bike, and can be quite comfortable, but that doesn't mean I'm going to own one. The power and agility you get from today's sport bikes is a rush! I love the "right now" feeling I get from the road bike, the near instant acceleration and razor sharp handling. I also love the plushness I get from my full sus. bike. So I have both. Sure, I ride the mtb more often, but there are days when I crave the speed and handling of the roadie.

    donalson, I've not seen another bike nearly that cheap. Here in the chicago area we have the same issue. OLD bikes, like 1970's cheap steel roadies, still command prices well over $150 when set up as fixies. Dad got a steal due to being in a town that has very little bike presence...

  13. #13
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
    Reputation: donalson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,359
    ya I occasionaly see the awesome deals on CL... but they are always gone by the time they get back to me... depends on where you are I suppose... LBS buddy was telling me about being over in new orleans and going to the 1st ever bike shop he's been in that doesn't sell bikes at all... just fixes em...
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    136
    This is what I have for my urban bike...





    ITs a 25" Trek 7200.

    It has 700c x 35 tires. Hold me fine, except I did bend a rim at one point. Must have hit it on a curb or something. I would like some stronger rims, but for now I just avoid curbs with what I have.


    Being a hybrid, I bought this thinking it can do more than road. It can to a degree, but nothing more than basic dirt trails. When it comes to a lot of climbs and descents, it fails. Not the best at climbing steep street hills either, and I am told its due to the geometry. Makes sense, since this bike sits you upright and does not lean your forward.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    124
    i just got a 92 trek 380 for free it was in a house fire so it smells like smoke but all the components are rusted up so looks like i'm gonna have the budget road bike i've been wanting! anyone have any idea where i can look to get the roadie handle bars and maybe a budget wheelset that will do good?
    2009 Gary Fisher Mako
    92' Trek 830 Antelope in restoration being turned into a commuter

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •