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  1. #1
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    How much brake needed for 250#

    Hi all, I started a newbie thread in the 29er section yesterday.

    I'm 6'2" 250 and the stock V brakes on my Monocog are decent, but the idea of one or two finger braking entices me. What size rotors would be good for a 250 pound guy? I was thinking the BB7s but am unsure on rotor size. Also, how do I know what sized rotors will be compatible on my 2011 monocog 29er?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    I Strava Hamburgers
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    I run 203mm's on my XC bike. Some people laugh at it, but Clydes generate a lot of downhill speed and that's usually where they'll throw the nifty switchback. If I was just doing straight fireroad I'd probably go with 160mms.

    I run Code 5s. They have some crazy stopping power with the 203s, but I find the modulation to be great once you get used to them.

    Moved up from Juicy 3s once I shouldered one too many trees on a pre XC ride one day.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdameron
    Hi all, I started a newbie thread in the 29er section yesterday.

    I'm 6'2" 250 and the stock V brakes on my Monocog are decent, but the idea of one or two finger braking entices me. What size rotors would be good for a 250 pound guy? I was thinking the BB7s but am unsure on rotor size. Also, how do I know what sized rotors will be compatible on my 2011 monocog 29er?

    Thanks!
    I don't know anything about your bike - so this may be a moot reminder.
    The largest rotor you can use may be dictated by the fork. Check what the fork will take. Some forks aren't able to handle 203 mm rotors. Ultimately depends on your riding. I have 203mm front/rear on my dh. On my XC I use 185 mm in front and 160 mm in back. Plenty of stopping power. (All brakes are bb7's),
    I was gonna stop by and see you, but the Jehovas witnesses came by. When they left I started drinking. Voicemail from Paul

  4. #4
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    Two things to keep in mind are the terrain you are riding and the modulation/power aspect.

    There are trails around here with a couple solid miles and 1500' to 2000' of vertical drop. If you are riding these types of trails you may want a bigger rotor that can absorb more energy without brake fade. If you are riding more rolling terrain then a big rotor will be overkill and could be a detriment to performance.

    A larger rotor will weigh a little more but the big issue is that with a larger rotor you get more stopping power. A light touch on the brakes is good up until a point for a particular rider. You need to have precise control of the brakes to get the best performance out of you bike and with more powerful brakes you needs to have an even more sensitive touch. If your brakes are too strong for you, you will have a hard time achieving max braking without applying too much pressure and skidding.

    My old bike I ran 185/185 but then switched to a 160 in the rear. My new bike came with 203/185s. I'm 210 btw. I prefer hydraulic brakes because I like the smooth feel of the brake pull vs BB7s which you can feel the cable slide.
    Last edited by ChainChain; 02-01-2011 at 01:22 PM.

  5. #5
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    Compared to your v-brakes, 6" fr/rr bb7s will feel l like a big upgrade. As noted above, if you start doing a lot of vertical you'll probably need to go 7/6 (or more).

  6. #6
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    I use 203mm BB7's front and rear and I am 300# and have zero issues with braking.
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  7. #7
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    160mm rear rotors on all mtb's. I have one bike that has a 180 front (FS Freeride bike), otherwise I use the 160's and have zero issues. The larger rotor does give more braking power but I have never, not once had an issue. I ride a lot of miles and am currently around 240lbs

  8. #8
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    Shimano Saints.
    A little pricey but worth it.
    I had Juicy 7 but could not stand them.

  9. #9
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    what kind of riding are you doing? If on a monocog for monocog style riding (trail/singletrack) I think 185f/160r are plenty good. I'm your weight and find I dont require anything outside of the norm.

    BB7's are a wonderful complement for this bike and a fantastic set of brakes, just get a good set of cables and you are golden.

    You dont need saints, stellar product that they are for a market more extreme than the monocog fantasizes about, save it for your freeride bike.

  10. #10
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    +1 to Moozh. bb7's with 160's seem sufficient for the purpose and nice upgrade.

    Edit: Also, remember that your frame and fork will work with one size rotor withou adapters (usually 160 I think), and then you can use adapters if you want to use a different size rotor. Some manufacturers require rotors under a specified size, I think larger rotors may void warantee--I assume this has to do with the larger forces that larger rotors can lead the calipers to exerting on the frame or fork. I''m not expert, but that stuff is probably in the ball park.

  11. #11
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    180mm front and rear with SLX's on both my 26" and 29er. I can stop on a dime at 280ish with either...

  12. #12
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    I'm not on a 29'er, but a full-susser and a big guy. I do mainly xc ad find that well tuned bb7's w/6' rotors work very well for me.

  13. #13
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    203/180 SLX for my 260 lbs.
    konahonzo

  14. #14
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    fwiw, my giant trance x2 was factory 185/160. the trails i ride have a lot of steep downhill with switchbacks and the occasional drop. i like to have braking control, and really didnt feel like i had it, ever.

    so im going 203/185, and really hope this fixes the problem.

    5'10" 260#

  15. #15
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    245# - 203x203 Formula the One.....works awesome, definitely able to shut the bike down like never before....

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by zukrider
    fwiw, my giant trance x2 was factory 185/160. the trails i ride have a lot of steep downhill with switchbacks and the occasional drop. i like to have braking control, and really didnt feel like i had it, ever.

    so im going 203/185, and really hope this fixes the problem.

    5'10" 260#
    I like having a smaller rotor on the rear brake for more of an even feel between front and rear, but sometimes you want to use a lot more rear brake than front brake to maintain front wheel traction in sketchy situations. If you're a big dude on a long, steep and sketchy DH descent, a 203mm rear rotor may be good insurance to know you can use your brakes as you need them.

    The 185 will have plenty of power and a 203mm rotor should have more than enough power, but it's the ability to dissipate heat that you, as a big guy riding the way you do, might make the 203mm rotor a better choice.

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