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  1. #1
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    How do get past the Plateau?

    I started biking (again) about 2 years ago. Dropped about 40 lbs in just a couple of months. I ride about 88 miles a week (4 days, 22 miles each day) Anway, I've hit a plateau in terms of weight loss and actually gained about 10 back. You would think I would continue to loose at those types of mileage, but that's not the case.

    Some additional info. I can't cross train due to a leg problem. No running, etc. So biking is really all I have as an option. I'm about 230 now. I typically do a no carb breakfast (slice of ham), lettuce and tuna for lunch, a yogurt / apple for snack and dinner is typically a salad and main dish. Dinner is harder to control, but I would say I do well about 75% of the time.

    Any thoughts on how the get the "fire" burning again? Any of you had similar issues? How to do get back on track?

  2. #2
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    Few things that may help:
    1. Shoot to only loose 1-2lbs a week. This will help you maintain your lean muscle mass already in place.

    2. Based on what you said your daily diet is, at 230 lbs you may not be getting enough caloric intake. Figure out your BMR and then how many calories you have to consume in order to have a 500-1000 calorie deficit and then start counting calories. This will prevent your body from thinking it's starving and storing everything as fat and burning muscle.

    3. Start resistance training, which will help build muscle and increase your metabolism for when you aren't working out.

    4. During your 22 mile ride, do intervals.

    There are plenty of threads in this forum that discuss overcoming the plateau and also everyone's opinions on the above noted items. I would recommend reading them. There was just one about a week ago discussing the benefits of intervals that is definetly worth a read.

  3. #3
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    +1 on the strength training.

    Also spread your meals out a bit (every couple of hours) and start keeping track of everything that goes into your body and log it on a program like Fitday. This will let you see exactly how much of what kinds of nutrients go into your body. You would be surprised.
    Retribution Fitness: Strength, Power, and Purpose
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  4. #4
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    I've been counting calories for a month. I had no idea the number of calories I was eating. I started at 238 in June and I'm down to 221 as of this morning. At 238 pounds, I could eat over 3000 calories a day and maintain my weight. At first, I cut it to about 1200-1500 calories a day without riding much. I lost weight quickly - about 10 pounds. Now - I'm eating 2000 calories a day and riding. I've been consistently losing on this plan - but I'm thinking of increasing the caloric intake to 2500 on the weekend to have a one larger meal

  5. #5
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    Took a shot at some intervals on the ride today. Certainly resulted in more sweat than usual. Impact of weight will have to wait for a week or so. Using timed intervals is a little tough (or I'm a little lazy), so I think initially I will set up some physical locations along my route to mark the start and end of my interval. That will probably be easier than working around stop signs and places where I need to dismount to get over some fences. That will also help me monitor the time it takes for each section to see if I am going any faster over time.

    Still need to get the weight lifting part going. Does rapid interval training with the weights also do better with weight loss versus just lifting? I just need a simple and easy program that will get me over the hump of actually starting. Once I get in the habit, I should be fine.

  6. #6
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    Good job with the intervals. That is what I do, I pick physical items either along the trail or on the road to determine my intervals. On the trail, I may try to do this or that section of trail as hard as I can and then recover on the next section or hit a hill as hard as I can knowing I will be able to recover on the downhill or flat section that follows, on the road I go so many utility poles or stop sign to stop sign.

    With strength training, you want to mix it up as well, one period hit heavy weights - low reps (5 sets of 5), next period do moderate-moderate (3 sets of 8) and then one period of light weight - high reps (3 sets of 20). Also mix up the routine, don't do the same excercises over and over. "Yeti" is a good resource for strength training as well as intervals, hopefully, he'll chime in on this in further detail, if not there are a bunch of previous posts on strength training. Another thing that I just started doing and it seems to be helping just after a few weeks is including olympic style lifts, (high pull, push press, snatch/grip/jump/shrug, etc...) these fast and powerful lifts are suppose to help the fast twitch muscles and also help induce fat burn, I am not sure about the science, but they sure are fun. Also, I started working dead lifts into my routines over the last few months and it has a great effect.

  7. #7
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    Interval based weight lifting does help with weight loss because your body is in a state of constant work. Rather than rest the entire body between sets you are rotating between exercises that train various different parts of the body while resting the part that was just used. Generally depending on your own individual strengths and deficiencies if you rotated through a horizontal push (bench press, pushup, dips), a horizontal pull(seated row, dumbbell row, hanging bodyrow), a vertical push(military press, medicine ball throws, sing arm dumbbell military press) , a vertical pull(various types of pull-ups, upright row), lower body(squat, box step-ups, lunges) , and abdominal (planks, back extension, sit-ups)exercise you should be ok. Varying the actual exercise in each section will work you out both mentally and physically. Doing something like this 3 days a week (M/W/F for example) will allow 48 hours of recovery between each session and let you perform something like cycling, running, or any other activity on the days in between and on the weekends. Periodize this over the course of a couple of months by lighter weight more reps (8 rounds of 12-15 reps for 2-4 weeks) to work on muscular endurance, then change to moderate weight for a little less reps (8 rounds of 8-10 reps for 2-4 weeks) to work on strength, and then switch it up to heavy weight for even less reps (5 rounds 5 reps for 2-4 weeks) for power. Follow this up with a week of recovery going to the gym maybe twice and doing 1 round of light weight and then start the cycle all over again testing your max strength every 2 cycles. Keep track of how much weight lifted during the course of everything to ensure that you are progressing and pushing yourself. This should give you an idea of what to think about when putting together a strength program. Remember all this can be adjusted based on each person’s strengths and weaknesses.

    Now if you don’t want to think about it and just follow a plan that’s updated daily go to the link in my signature and click on “workouts” and then the “lite” program. This has 3 days of weights and 1 day of cardio. You can follow it as is or you can switch the 3 days of weights to M/W/F and fill in the off days with cycling. It’s in a recovery week right now so the next cycle picks up on Monday.

    Olympic lifts like clean, snatch, push press, etc, are great explosive total body lifts. However these have a very steep technique leaning curve. Take the time to learn the technique before going at it full bore.
    Retribution Fitness: Strength, Power, and Purpose
    General fitness workouts posted daily.

  8. #8
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    forget about weight. are you getting skinnier? looser pants? lower body fat?

    if you packed on 10lbs and dropped your BF%, you're doing perfectly fine.. your diet seems pretty low calorie, and you're hitting the bike reasonably hard.. you might not be gaining any fat.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomsmoto
    forget about weight. are you getting skinnier? looser pants? lower body fat?

    if you packed on 10lbs and dropped your BF%, you're doing perfectly fine.. your diet seems pretty low calorie, and you're hitting the bike reasonably hard.. you might not be gaining any fat.
    Yes really good point.................my weight only drops about 0.5lbs per week but my clothes get bigger quite quickly and my body fat % goes down well (innacurate % but moderatley consistant machine)...
    Riding ,trainning and dieting isn't the same as "I am eating 2000 cals a day doing no excercise and losing 4lbs a week"................they usually put it back on !

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