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  1. #1
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    How can I stop breaking Sh*t

    I ran the hell out of my 26 hardrock 2011. Its sitting disabled cuz I got tired of putting money into it. I bought nice used 2011 Rockhopper 29er. 2 easy rides with stock pedals and today I put my nicer platforms on and what do you know the rear derailleur couldnt handle it. It was shifting all over without my input and then the hang snapped and bent the hell out of derailleur. Im getting tired of carrying my busted ass bike back to my car.

    Are all bikes and components this weak? I need a new hanger and probably a new rear derailleur any thing that will hold up? Im really getting tired of **** breaking on my bikes when Im not crashing and Im considering getting a road bike to stop all this nonsense.

    Should I sell both and buy a more expensive bike? Will they not break? I'll be seriously pissed if I spend 2k on a bike and it break.

  2. #2
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    Derailleurs just don't break...and pedals have nothing to do with them so that is not your cause of failure. If you're constantly breaking parts I would look at your riding style. I have a friend who weighs 150lbs soaking wet and breaks everything. I have weighed as much as 235lbs (a svelte 210lbs these days) and break things very infrequently.

    He breaks things because he shifts under power, rams into everything without any finesse, and crashes frequently. I shift at proper times, am smooth through rough sections, and crash less frequently...and oh yea am also a faster descender.
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  3. #3
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    To be honest, if you keep breaking parts, then your technique needs work.

  4. #4
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    As mentioned above, until you learn how bikes actually are supposed to work, and practice good technique, you will likely continue to break parts regardless of the type of bike you ride.

    Sometimes the rear derailleur hanger will break because the rear skewer was not tight enough, and then when it breaks, it can swing into the spokes and ruin the derailleur as well as take out some spokes. The hanger is not strong enough by itself to support the derailleur, but works as a part of the dropout, and the skewer presses them tightly together. The little chainring type nut/bolt that holds the hanger in place is not enough. Make sure the skewer requires quite a bit of pressure to close it fully (applied with the palm of your hand, and then it will require a fair bit of strength to undo.

    If the derailleur cage is what is bent, you may be able to partially disassemble it and flatten the pieces back out. I have done this several times, and rarely can't get them to work again.

  5. #5
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    Buy more expensive parts. Then you'll care more.

  6. #6
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    Yes, your pedals should not have any effect on your derailleur at all. If the hanger was bent when you got the bike, it could have caused the rear derailleur to be misaligned, which would lead to the problem with random shifting and eventual breakage. It sucks to replace parts, but I suspect you'll be fine once you get a new hanger and derailleur. The rear derailleur and shifter are probably the pieces of drivetrain equipment that I would invest the most money in. Get the best you can afford and it should perform without trouble.
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  7. #7
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    It wasnt my technique. In the beginning yes. The pedal swap helps me increase my speed/pedal power. I didn't hit anything when it the hanger snapped and the derailleur went into the wheel. I was pedaling on a fairly flat area but it was shifting on its own so maybe you guys are right and it was previously bent or misaligned to begin with....

    Thanks Jeff and authalic. Ill try to bend it back, get a new hanger and try my best to adjust it.

  8. #8
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    Was it changing gears on its own during those first 2 rides? Since it broke only after 2 easy ride as you put it, I think dude was selling it because it was broken.
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  9. #9
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    i also tend to break stuff. i got the more 'durable' stuff to replace em.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mykill84 View Post
    It wasnt my technique..
    I think you are in denial. It has everything to do with your technique. Not so much your riding style or crashing, its insisting on riding with parts that are obviously not functioning correctly, which ended in complete failure. If you had a hole in the radiator of your car and it was steaming, would you continue to drive it until the motor blew?

    Hangers and r/d aren't all that tough, and cheap ones can be a pain in the ass sometimes. I ride a 09 Rockhopper Comp, and have replaced almost every component on it. I accepted the fact that I bought a low end bike, and planned on replacing the parts as they break.

    IMHO, replace the components with good stuff (x7/x9 XT) and you will be set for many miles to come. Also, make sure that if something doesn't sound ride, and you aren't either in a race or life-or-death situation, that you stop and evaluate the situation prior to forging on.

  11. #11
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    Only way is to stop riding. I sometimes break expensive stuff. Like duh, huh?

    Technique, keeping things in top tune, are critical especially for bigger guys if you don't want to walk back to the car.

    If something's not functioning right, stop, figure it out and fix it.
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412 View Post
    Only way is to stop riding. I sometimes break expensive stuff. Like duh, huh?
    Or if you are crazy enough, go rigid single speed. It's damn hard to break stuff when there are less stuff to break
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  13. #13
    FKA Malibu412
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4nbstd View Post
    Or if you are crazy enough, go rigid single speed. It's damn hard to break stuff when there are less stuff to break
    Mostly true. I break stuff ss'ing.
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  14. #14
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    You guys and your stupid SS rigid comments. It seems like anytime someone with a hard-on for a SS gets a chance to suggest it they do. WTF?

    How do I climb better....get a SS
    Which squishy fork should I get.....go SS Rigid.
    How do I lighten my bike up....go F yourself.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4nbstd View Post
    Was it changing gears on its own during those first 2 rides? Since it broke only after 2 easy ride as you put it, I think dude was selling it because it was broken.
    i thought so too.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    You guys and your stupid SS rigid comments. It seems like anytime someone with a hard-on for a SS gets a chance to suggest it they do. WTF?

    How do I climb better....get a SS
    Which squishy fork should I get.....go SS Rigid.
    How do I lighten my bike up....go F yourself.
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  17. #17
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    ^haha

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    I think you are in denial. It has everything to do with your technique. Not so much your riding style or crashing, its insisting on riding with parts that are obviously not functioning correctly, which ended in complete failure. If you had a hole in the radiator of your car and it was steaming, would you continue to drive it until the motor blew?

    Hangers and r/d aren't all that tough, and cheap ones can be a pain in the ass sometimes. I ride a 09 Rockhopper Comp, and have replaced almost every component on it. I accepted the fact that I bought a low end bike, and planned on replacing the parts as they break.

    IMHO, replace the components with good stuff (x7/x9 XT) and you will be set for many miles to come. Also, make sure that if something doesn't sound ride, and you aren't either in a race or life-or-death situation, that you stop and evaluate the situation prior to forging on.
    Thanks for the advice. I admit I dont know much about the bike and have had the shifting issues before so I just figured it was part of it. I guess it could've been out of adjustment some and I probably didnt help it.

    Does the x7/x9 stuff work with the shimano shifters or would I have to upgrade/change those as well?

  19. #19
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    SRAM shifters with 1:1 actuation have to be used with X7/X9.
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  20. #20
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    The Shimano SLX and XT stuff is pretty good too, if you already have shimano shifters and are happy with that then there is little point in changing. I've ridden bunch-a miles on both shimano and sram and at the commensurate product levels they are pretty close in durability.

    For high-danger stuff (e.g. rear d) you MAY want to consider SLX over XT *if* it is noticably cheaper, the SLX tends to be heavier but not less functional than XT. I did notice that with the current 10 speed stuff that the SLX/XT rear-d's are very close in price - as in not enough to warrant getting SLX instead of XT. Shop around though.

    FWIW, I *used* to be a solid clyde (240-250) and put a ton of miles in ... my eating just always kept pace with my biking ... and I *used* to regularly have equipment issues ... time and learning technique solved a lot of it. I still tend to go through 1 rear wheel build per season, but sometimes I get 2 seasons out of it. I've managed to stabilize my equipment wear on the rest of the bike through improved technique and not using crappy parts. I also rode an over-built bike (Titus Quasi-Moto), which built into a mid 30# 26er FS bike with 6" travel, for me that was a "light" XC machine.

    I also learned to be a fanatic about some maintenance issues, primarily (like others said) if the bike was making ANY suspect noise I had to figure it out and fix it NOW. During rides, if need be. I also became over-fanatical about keeping the drivetrain clean and properly lubed, and replacing chains every 4-8 weeks in order to improve longevity of the rings and rear cogs. I'd brush-down and wipe off the chain, cogs, and rings after every ride, literally.

    If you're in the neighborhood/over 200# as a rider, and ride hard or regular, you can NOT think that you'll have long lasting parts in some cases ... and don't EVEN bother comparing wear-rates with lighter friends.

    For me, primary wear items were chains, brake pads, tires, rear shock bushings and mounting hardware, pedal cleats.

    Annually I expected to replace/rebuild the rear wheel, and many bearings. If my shoes lasted a season I was happy.

    Good luck.

  21. #21
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    Im 6'4 245 and ride about 3-4 times a week. So I guess this is part of the process.

    Thanks bear for posting that. There is a lot of good information or me in there.

  22. #22
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    I had 2 old bikes that I broke...both of them were supposed to be high qualit bikes..(Marin)..but they both broke..I dunno if it was my riding style..the fact that they were both old bikes..04 & 05...regardless I was without bike for a while...then I got a 2012 Trek Fuel EX 5..I have not changed the way I ride or anything..but the bike has held up very well..Ive thrown alot of stuff at it.its been rock solid...on the last 2 bikes...it was a crack in the frame in one and the other the rear swingarm split in two...normally the first thing I break or mess up is the rims..and I have yet to do that with this Trek..Im very pleased with it...Im 5'10" and 250 pds.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mykill84 View Post
    Im 6'4 245 and ride about 3-4 times a week. So I guess this is part of the process.

    Thanks bear for posting that. There is a lot of good information or me in there.
    im your size dude- 6-4 and 235ish now (down from almost 270) and it really made a difference to up the skillset. that and having things properly tuned and adjusted.

    if i recall you are also in NE Ohio, just cant remember where...there are some really good lbs in the area, take advantage and have a quality tuneup done. get everything dialed right, everything adjusted right, everything fitting right- and for the sake of all that work, stay outta the saddle as much as possible as a fat bastard, that was my greatest downfall, and toughening up my legs and getting some stamina built up has done me and my hardware no end of good. riding in the saddle like its a motorcycle contributed to much of my hardware issues- including bent hangers from poor shifting technique while sitting on my ass.

    practice, practice, practice. and when you think you got your sh!t right and tight- practice some more. no one is ever above practice and improving their technique, and i am a firm believer through rough experience that practice and polish in your technique is more important than high-end groups and high-dollar addons. if you ride properly and smoothly, even a sh!tty wally world bike can take you places.
    If you arent bleeding, you arent riding hard enough.
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  24. #24
    FKA Malibu412
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    Quote Originally Posted by big terry View Post
    if you ride properly and smoothly, even a sh!tty wally world bike can take you places.
    ...like the ER...
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4nbstd View Post
    Or if you are crazy enough, go rigid single speed. It's damn hard to break stuff when there are less stuff to break
    Eh, stuff does break, last week my friends son, who weighs about 130 soaking wet, broke the chain on his single speed...

    But I agree that if one is hard on a bike, stuff will break, no matter what the weight of the rider. Another guy we ride with breaks just about everything he rides. His current bike has pretty much all new parts aside from the front rim and the frame. He guts bottom brackets, derailleurs and kills seats and seat posts. his bike is on the 2nd fork and he rebuilt it once. The kid is half my weight if that!

    I go 270 -280 and have only managed to bend some saddle rails (cheap stock saddle) and one seat post clamp stripped. (Again, cheap stock seat post) I am learning to ride right, and light, and stuff is pretty much staying intact on my ride.
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