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  1. #1
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    How break a brand new bike in two weeks

    Hi everyone,
    **title should say how to break a brand new bike in two weeks** ;0)
    I'm new here and new to MTB also. I just bought a brand new Rockhopper comp 2007 a few weeks ago and I already broke a skewer (after 10min of riding) which was replaced under warranty and today (must be because it's friday the 13th) I just tacoed my rear wheel doing a bunny hop on a curb.

    I'm 5"7 and 260 pounds. Is it normal for a bike to break this quickly or am I a really bad rider.

    Here is a pic of my bike wheel:



    Thanks

  2. #2
    R.I.P. DogFriend
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    I think you already know you landed it wrong or were underinflated. You may be a candidate for some burly wheels more because of your riding style than your weight.

    Learn to be smoother and how to take hits at speed without breaking parts. 160 pounders can break stuff with poor technique too.

  3. #3
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    I'm with JeffJ. My guess is the skewer was defective- it happens, and you got off angle on the bunny hop. The heavier you are the more perfect your landings will have to be- stuff nature would forgive a 170 lbs. guy for doing will result in broken equipment for big guys. I guess it's also possible that the spokes were under-tensioned as well. Velocity makes a really strong Clyde wheel- I forget the name.
    To the troll mobile, away...

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the replies,

    I brought the bike to the shop for repairs. I'm thinking of getting a good rear wheel but I feel like I should wait until my skills improve a little. Also, I'm contemplating investing in a truing stand. Would that be worth the money?

    thanks

  5. #5
    NormalNorm
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    A rear wheel shouldnt taco from a bunny hop off a curb. Usually a taco'd wheel is from side forces or a totally collaspe of the wheel. Sounds like the wheel is poorly built. I have 819's hand built on to xt hubs and cant knock'em out of true. I weigh 240, and ride pretty hard.

    What kind of rim and hub is it?

  6. #6
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    That bike isn't broken. It was just abused is all.

    That is a "tacoed" wheel? No wonder all you people "taco" wheels all the time.... you call any wheel that is slightly out of round or bent, "tacoed".

    It is all clear to me now.

    Just keep riding. I will let you know when you, "taco" a wheel because that aint it.



    This will get everyone started. Picture a taco shell in your mind... Are you seeing it? Now imagine your wheel in that shape.... the shape of a taco shell. Now you have an idea of what a, "tacoed" wheel is.

  7. #7
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    This is wha the wheels are (stock for the rockhopper):

    Specialized/Alex RHD 26, double wall disc w/ eyelets
    Specialized Hi Lo disc, 32h, CNC flange and disc mount, polished races, alloy QR

    I guess you are right 29Colossus. But the picture doesn't do justice to the wheel. The wheel is done in any case.

  8. #8
    Captain Underpants
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    mmmmm, tacos . . . . .

    Improperly tensioned wheel + new rider = out of true wheel.

    I'd personally dump the 32 Hole for a beefy 36 hole build.

    Colossus, stop talking about tacos, you are making me hungry.

  9. #9
    NormalNorm
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    Yeah, pretty good parts there. I would say that the spoke tension was low causing it to collaspe. Alot of the times, the manufacturer will skimp out and build the wheels fast....aka low tension. Too much tension will also cause problems. I learned the hard way, by trial and error.

  10. #10
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    Spoke tension eh? Well, what would be a easy way to tell if the spoke tension is low? I saw some spoke tension meters online but that seems to be for wheel builders. I read a lot about hand made wheels on this forum. Would that be a good upgrade?

  11. #11
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    Nothing to get "bent out of shape about".
    Trek 4300 2006
    M580 LX cranks
    11-34T Cassette
    Kool-stop pads
    El Notre 7075 Seatpost
    Laser V saddle

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rckhopper
    Spoke tension eh? Well, what would be a easy way to tell if the spoke tension is low? I saw some spoke tension meters online but that seems to be for wheel builders. I read a lot about hand made wheels on this forum. Would that be a good upgrade?
    The shop should have one and use it when they repair the wheel. They should know you're a big guy and will need a tight wheel. It seems that wheel building machines building economy wheels stop tensioning when they meet a bare minimum tension and the wheel is true. Economy wheels also won't start with rims as straight, requiring some spokes to be tighter than others to make it true.

    Handmade wheels are as good as the hands that make them. Keep poking around and you'll find a lot of complaints about handmade wheels as well. In general, a good wheel is a good wheel no matter who or what made it.

    The wheel I was thinking of in my last post is the Velocity Heavy Metal- 36 spoke 3x, about as beefy as you can get.

    http://www.velocityusa.com/default.asp?contentID=521

    And yes, you will be able to break it if you land wrong, though it will be much tougher than stock. The key is to try to keep the shock forces up and down. The tensile strength of the spokes is incredibly strong and you'll have a heck of a time breaking or bending the top of the wheel when you land straight. (It may seem counterintuitive, but the top spokes are the ones supporting you- the bike 'hangs' from the top spokes instead of being 'held up' by the bottom ones.) If you put sideways pressure on the wheel, the compressive strength of spokes at the bottom of the wheel is nowhere near as strong (hence the need for a nice tight wheel in tension all the time) and- bend.

    Edit: And easy ways to tell if spoke tension is too low- clicking sounds when rolling slowly (caused by a spoke so loose it can move around against the eyelet or hub), and a 'flat' or 'thuddy' sound when you pluck the spokes like a guitar string. The tighter the tension the higher the pitch. The former always tells you tension is too low. The later is a guideline, not a rule. Wheels always have some spokes tighter than others to get true.
    Last edited by California L33; 07-15-2007 at 02:12 AM.
    To the troll mobile, away...

  13. #13
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    thanks a lot California L33. That was very informative. I'll check out those wheels and see if I can scrap up some money to get them.

    Nic

  14. #14
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    He left out that when he tried to hop that curb that he wound up casing his rear wheel on the curb!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rckhopper
    thanks a lot California L33. That was very informative. I'll check out those wheels and see if I can scrap up some money to get them.

    Nic
    My pleasure.

    And here's a picture of a real tacoed wheel from the Tour de France. The dog ran in front of Marcus Burghardt. When he realized he couldn't stop he turned hard right with the wheel locked, and this is the result. Burghardt went over the handlebars and landed on the dog; both appeared relatively unharmed. And no shop Wrench is going to be bringing that wheel back into true
    Attached Images Attached Images
    To the troll mobile, away...

  16. #16
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    Has anyone ever enchiladad a wheel?

    That would be sweet.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlipperyPete
    Has anyone ever enchiladad a wheel?

    That would be sweet.
    A decree from on high- when a wheel is bent on a dry surface it shall be known as tacoing.

    When it is bent in mud it shall be known as enchiladaing- the mud being the sauce.

    So it is written, so it shall be
    To the troll mobile, away...

  18. #18
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    an over-tight wheel is probably worse than a slack wheel, so don't go mad there. There is middle ground that will flex enough but not too much - you need that.

    I'm always amazed by guys like you - I'm 250lbs and haven't bent a wheel yet! What sort of pressure were you running the tyre at? and if you bunny hop a kerb, get the wheel up it, not on the edge!

  19. #19
    fat guy on a little bike
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    Quote Originally Posted by California L33
    So it is written, so it shall be

    MAN LAW!

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