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  1. #1
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    Help for a tube destroyer?

    Hey guys, this is my first post in here. I have this problem where I keep getting flats. At first I dont think I used enough air pressure, maybe around 25-30 PSI. After I kept getting pinch flats I decided to up the air pressure to around 35-40 and It seemed to fix the pinch flats. Except now I keep getting mystery flats, one time was from a patched tube that didnt seal to well, but held up for a day or two. But it doesnt appear to be cuts or punctures, more like splits. The tubes I use most are "Avenir" from ***** but I did replace it with a Bell tube from Wally world. It seems I am never close enough to my LBS or they are closed when I am in need of one, I figured I should stop by there but I wanted to get a few more opinions or see what peoples experiences were.

    Im 6'1 240lbs and I ride a 96 Giant Iguana with a new Dart 3 fork, so far the bike has held up extremely well. I am still a beginer so I dont ride anything crazy just XC trails in SC, so I dont think I am being overly rough on it. But I would like to upgrade to a nicer bike sometime.

    Thanks
    Calvin

  2. #2
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
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    Before installing any new tube, check the inside and outside of your tires for thorns, glass, nails, etc in-beaded in them. Also check that your rim strip is covering all the spoke holes in the rim and there are no burrs in the rim.

    There are some thicker but not super thick tubes out there such as the Michelin Airstop or Panaracer Supertube. You could also try Slime tubes, though they protect against punctures but not well against pinch flats.

  3. #3
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    Tubeless + Stan's. Flats are few and far between now, less than one per year.
    "Donuts. Is there anything they can't do?"

  4. #4
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    Thanks I have checked the rim and tires, actually even replaced the rear tire too. I will have to check my LBS for some thicker tubes. The Tubeless w/ stans is that a fairly costly option? I am kind of budget oriented at this point in time.

  5. #5
    R.I.P. DogFriend
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    Standard tubes should be fine unless you have a thorn/goathead problem in the area you're riding in.

    I'd be checking where on the tube the holes are appearing. If it's on the underside, you could have rim strip issues. Sometimes the breaches in a rim strip are not easily found without removing the rim strip, especially the plastic ones like the ones used on many bikes from the mid-90's

    The pressures you are running would be OK for larger tires, but if you're running 2.1" or narrower tires, you might think about running a bit more pressure in them, especially the rear.

    You could also be pinching them when you install them depending on your technique. It could also be just a run of bad luck.

  6. #6
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    A tubeless kit from Stan's will cost about $60.
    "Donuts. Is there anything they can't do?"

  7. #7
    29 some of the time...
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    Pop, are you seriously recommending tubeless conversion to a newbie? Tubes work great and are IMO far less stressful for a new rider. Don't get me wrong, tubeless is a good thing but just not for everyone and not something I would put on an inexperienced rider/mechanic. Of course if Calvin is interested in that there is no harm. I just think it is adding another variable that isn't necessary.

    Okay, back to the question at hand. We really should have a sticky posted on this topic. Big guys need more pressure. Depending on tire size and terrain. Pure guess, but based on the bike mentioned you are probably on 2.0-2.1 tires. For that size tire I would be up in the 40-50psi range to avoid pinch flats.

    Next, random flats are usually due to thorns or other sharp stuff getting imbedded in the tire. Check the inside of the tire with your hand to feel for sharp or poky things. Remove any you find. The other culprit is a bad rim strip. If your rim strip is worn or doesn't cover the spoke holes fully then the burrs around them can cause tube failure. Get a new rim strip if that is the case.

    Lastly, use sealant. Even with tubes I find I get far fewer flats if I use sealant in my tubes (I always use sealant with tubeless as well). Slime is easy to install and available at such fine establishments as Walmart (of course the local bike shop should also have some). I use Stan's sealant. Not sure if it is better, but I trust it. Using sealant will significantly reduce mystery flats
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  8. #8
    Fat guy on a bike
    Reputation: Mordy's Avatar
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    Those Avenir tubes are crap! I've had them do that splitting thing too. I regret buying them but, like you said, sporting stores like ***** are the only ones open or nearby sometimes when you need a tube.

    I would go to a LBS and get a better brand of tube(when you have time), or order some Kenda tubes from like Pricepoint.com

  9. #9
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    Thanks guys, I will probably go and check out a different brand of tubes and maybe run somemore air in them as well.. after I give those tires and strips a once over again

    air not are - sorry about that. I hate when I type too fast for my own good
    Last edited by kalvin06; 08-08-2009 at 10:06 AM.

  10. #10
    change is good
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    I use Stans tubeless - have to choose the right tire though. Easiest setup, but heavy. Make a small slit in a new quality tube, inject two scoops of stans with a 20cc syringe, patch with high quality patch, use big cheap, heavy, tough tires or expensive Armadillos from Specialized. First, if no one has told you this; make sure you check your air pressure before every ride.

    so I don't think I am being overly rough on it
    you might be underselling your self. I did for the longest time until I started riding with others.

    I'm 6'1 240lbs
    + youth + fit + aggressive can be extremely hard on tires.

  11. #11
    29 some of the time...
    Reputation: AL29er's Avatar
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    Fat + low pressure + aggressive + clumsy when tired can also be hard on tires
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  12. #12
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    lol I would like to say that I am all muscle but that is sad sad misconception on my part

  13. #13
    redefined
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    819s + Stans + Armadillos and say goodbye to flats forever.
    And though I can hide my cold gaze and you can shake my hand and feel flesh gripping yours...I simply am not there.

  14. #14
    Underskilled
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    40-50 PSI at your weight, when you really get into biking, ghetto tubeless and never get a puncture again.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by kalvin06
    But it doesnt appear to be cuts or punctures, more like splits.


    that screams "low quality tube." There isn't a whole lot that you could be doing that would cause the seams to let go. Since getting to the LBS is an issue, you might want to consider Performance or Pricepoint, they often have 10/$20 deals on their house brand tubes, I've been using both for years without problems. Having a bunch of tubes around is often a good idea anyway.

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