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  1. #1
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    Hardtail 29er for a superclyde?

    OK, now that I've crossed a full suspension 29er off my options, I could use your help with finding a hardtail 29er. My LBS deals mainly with Treks/Fishers, but they can get any (preferably mainstream manufacturers) model I want.

    So, what's the toughest 29er you know/recommend?

    Again, would very much appreciate your input!

  2. #2
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    That'd be a Nicolai Argon FR 29er:

    http://nicolai.net/34-1-Argon+FR.html

    But why did you cross out full suspension? Just curious.

  3. #3
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    As I mentioned, I'm a superclyde (350+). It's my understanding regular rear shocks will not work efficiently under such stresses. Adding a custom shock will probably be out of my budget.
    I'm not sure Nicolai is distributed in my country. I'll check. The frame looks like a 26", though, no?

  4. #4
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    Nicolai will most certainly ship to your country. The frame on the webside is a 26" model, but since they are custom built you can basically get whatever you want. I don't know whether there's a custom surcharge for the FR to be built as a 29er, but there are definitely 29" Argon FRs around. Just send them an email or call them.

    At 350lb I'd probably use a coil sprung damper, but otherwise I actually don't see a problem. The loads will still hardly match those of downhill racing and extreme freeriding. I'd just make sure to get a stiff frame with good bearings (or bushings). Lightweight mass production won't do. A hardtail is certainly the easier way out though

  5. #5
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    My boss is your size and rides a steel framed Surly. He is a weight lifter too, and puts some power down. He only really needed to upgrade the wheelset (Mavic Crossmax), and he hasn't broke anything in a while.

  6. #6
    local trails rider
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    The toughest 29ers out there probably come as frame-only.
    Banshee Paradox and Canfield Yelly Screamy come to my mind.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  7. #7
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    Unless you are hitting hardcore trails or jumping...pretty much most frames on the market (excluding carbon fiber) will work...it's the components that are going to be the issue.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  8. #8
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    First off, at 300+, good idea to stay away from dual squish.

    I'd try a surly or even the redline bikes. Strong steel frames and pretty cheap.

  9. #9
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    Is steel stronger than aluminum?
    The steel frames look so skinny, I'm afraid I'd break them before I even start pedalling

  10. #10
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    Thats a huge point of contention and the answer is yes or no. Each material is great for frames and it all depends on who designed it. The Surly and redline frames are designed very burly and stiff. Steel tubes are smaller due to the higher strength of steel, and even though they are smaller they are heavier than aluminum and just as strong or stronger. Really any frame should hold up if you are doing light XC riding.

    One very important thing I forgot to mention is to make sure that the frame can handle a big rear tire (2.4 or 2.5 inches). A big tire will help cushion a lot of the bumps.

  11. #11
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    Steel will also flex and offer a tiny bit of "suspension" in that way. It can also flex over and over and over. Aluminum does not flex. It's a stiffer ride. And when aluminum does flex...over time it weakens and will break. That is not saying you will flex or break an aluminum frame...that is just one of the differences. Aluminum frames look beefier than steel because the tubing needs to be a larger diameter to equal the strength of steel tubing at a much smaller size. While a steel frame may be heavier...we are only talking about a pound or two and in reality...when the rider is 300+ pounds...that one or two pound difference in bike weight really isn't going to be noticed.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  12. #12
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    And just to reiterate what I said before and what Sasquatch also said, pretty much any frame on the market today is going to be fine as long as it is not marketed as a light weight race type frame. Pretty much any $1000 or less bike is not going to be a "race" bike so that shouldn't be a concern. Just get out to as many shops as you can and try some bikes...try to find aluminum and steel bikes and test ride them...see what fits and feels good, then go from there.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  13. #13
    1/2 fast or 1/2 assed?
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    As a noob myself I also shy'd away from FS bc of my lack of experience and funds. I decided that I should find something with better components rather than rear suspension.

    OP, you didnt mention your experience or price range. Its hard to recommend something w/o that info.
    I'm a ******bag in real life so I dont have to be one on the interwebz.

  14. #14
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    if your going FS 29 id reccomend a Lenz

    they have a beefier downtube options for clydes like us. send them an email and tell them your specs. they can build something specifically for you if you want to go full Squish.

    if non-squish i'd go with other custom frame builders who can make something specifically for you. siren maybe?

    where are you at btw?
    Let it flow, let yourself go, slow and low, that is the tempo.

  15. #15
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    OP, you didnt mention your experience or price range.
    I'm not a newbie. I've ridden a 26" hardtail (Gary Fisher Wahoo) for some time now, almost exclusively simple XC trails. Not as often as I like... part of the reason I'm going to change.

    My price range is a bit tricky, as I live in Israel, and local pricing does not strictly follow the American prices. I guess 2500-3000 USD is about it. Could go up to 3500 for something special.

    where are you at btw?
    As I said, I live in Israel. This makes it problematic for me to consider boutique/custom shops/builds. Lenz, Siren, Banshee, Canfield (their Yelli Screamy looks awesome!) are not distributed in Israel. I really don't want to buy something I haven't seen with my own eyes. Not to mention the practical stuff like shipping stuff here (and back in case of problems) - the cost/time this would take.

  16. #16
    local trails rider
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    If you know other riders in your area, they may be able to suggest shops that will take good care of you. Also, mtbr has many members in Israel. You could try to get in touch with some of them: go to http://forums.mtbr.com/members/list/ and make an Advanced Search by country.

    Many European shops will ship to almost any destination, and the shipping does not have to be hugely expensive, but I agree that buying local is a good idea, at least until you know exactly what is what and what you like.

    Buying international also means that you may have to pay all sorts of taxes and duties to your home country.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  17. #17
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    I bought a Specialized Rockhopper 29'r last Spring and really enjoy it. I'm old (50), slow and 300#'s. So with that in mind I do a lot of back roads, gravel, asphalt mix and have a few areas where I can do a couple miles worth of relatively flat single track. Too old and fat to jump and bang trees anymore, just old, slow, and lovin' the Spesh!

  18. #18
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    I love my Specialized 29er too. It has held up great for me as high as 320#. Now I am hovering around 295 but hoping once I get into full summertime gear I can get that number even further south.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  19. #19
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    i had an xtc29 1 for a while and it held up well to my uberness, nice strong wheels and 15mm thruy axle fox fork work well under the big guys... just get a new seat!
    Josh

  20. #20
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    What about Kona? They had a line of Clydesdale bikes some years ago and my brother got himself a Hoss Deluxe, which looks rather indestructible to me. It's a 26in bike though and cost much less than what you can (want?) spend.

    Another idea would be buying a Cannondale Trail SL and upgrading it. The lifetime warranty and 1.5in headtube seem rather convincing to me. I don't know how good the RST forks (Trail SL 2) are, but with the 1.5in headtube you can use any fork: 1.125, taper, 1.5. I don't know whether one of the other superclydes has any experience with the Lefty, but its stiffness is certainly a pro argument.

    BTW this looks awesome:


    http://www.cannondale.com/isr/2011/b...-trail-sl-29-3
    Last edited by Midgetman; 05-19-2011 at 12:18 AM.

  21. #21
    Old Punk
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    I love my rockhopper, and ride it like mad hell. I'm 6'3"/215 and ride the 21", but they also make a giant friendly 23" frame as well. The stock wheels were trashed after one season, but I ride it hard.
    '09 Specialized Rockhopper expert 29
    Born 26" trials
    '07 Specialized Allez

  22. #22
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    As far as rear suspension, at least in the case of Fox stuff, the weight limit is 300lbs according to the company. I have heard if you are near its uber bouncy. A coil spring option would have to be it.

    As far as bikes, Trek has said their bikes are intended for people up to 300lbs. I don't know if that is the frame or what, because their components certainly can't handle me at 285lbs. You may be able to get away with one of the Trek/Fisher 29ers by upgrading the wheels, seat post, seat, and cranks. You would probably want a larger disc up front from braking as well.

  23. #23
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    Thanks to everyone who answered. Haven't made a final decision yet, but it's down to Kona, Cannondale and GF. I'll go look at the actual bikes before I decide...

  24. #24
    local trails rider
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    I know several cases where people have put their light weight Fishers in hard use ... and the frame has cracked. When light weight is a priority in the design, at some point strength must suffer.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    I know several cases where people have put their light weight Fishers in hard use ... and the frame has cracked. When light weight is a priority in the design, at some point strength must suffer.
    Tell me about it...

    Almost every maker puts "light weight" as their 1st priority these days. The only ones making "tough" bikes are boutique shops, which sadly are not an option for me.

    If only Kona would make a 29" Hoss...

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