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  1. #1
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    Free-ride Full Suspension Bike

    Been lurking on this forum for a while and have done some searching and it has been a great help. I have been riding for years and currently ride a Kona Hoss Delux and love it.

    Lateley I have caught the free-ride bug and have been taking my Hoss on some pretty narly steeps and drops and am finding it a bit lacking. (Vancouver NorthShore, Burke Mountain, Woodlot) Like I said, it is a great all-around bike but not overly suited for strict free-ride/downhill conditions where I usually hike/ride up and fly down. So I have decided to purchase another bike to use strictly for this type of riding. (Steep downhills, ladders, drops no more than 5 feet).

    I am 6'2" and 260lbs fully geared. I have a short inseam so standover clearance is important. Any suggestions for a tough, clyde--worthy full suspension free-ride bike? Although cost matters, life is too short and I am willing to dish out coin for a good ride.

  2. #2
    roots, rocks, rhythm
    Reputation: Dawgprimo's Avatar
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    From the rides you describe I take it you are from the Lower Mainland.
    So you have alot of good LBS around to shop that have quite a few options for sturdy Freeride bikes. The North Shore has lots of good bike stores that have a variety of good freeride bike but you have shop and compare. Not only is the frame important but the components that come with it.
    Budget or no budget?????
    If money is not a issue I would look at Knolly but they are pricey but very nice. [You pay for what you get.] A Knolly be my next bike if I was looking for a freeride bike.

    Other options are Santa Cruz (Forgot the name of the frame) or Kona Stinky series.
    Personally I ride a Turner RFX and I am always amazed how good the bike is. The bike is good up and incredible down.
    That is probably not all that helpful...........

    One thing one has to remember is what is good for one person might not be good for another. You just have to get out and test ride some.


  3. #3
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    Reputation: saba's Avatar
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    Look at the Yeti ASX

  4. #4
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    I am same height/weight as you and I just bought the rocky mountain slayer 50, it handles really great, and with some parts swap you could beef it up a bit.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ryando's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies. Looks like the Yeti ASX may have some rear-end flex issues
    http://bb.nsmb.com/showthread.php?t=82128
    Any other suggestions. I was just going to compile a list then go to some local bike shops and give'em all a spin

  6. #6
    long standing member
    Reputation: PCinSC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryando
    Any other suggestions?
    If money was no object, I'd build up a Knolly Delerium T. Or if you gonna do big hucks go with the V-tach.



    If money is an consideration (and it is for most of us) how about a used Turner RFX? I just picked up a used frame that I'm going to build up for trail riding and DH and it's so overbuilt that it'll handle anything I could possibly dish out. It can handle a single or double crown fork, which is a decision that I'm trying to make right now.

    In both cases you're looking at building up a bike from scratch, though. If you want a complete bike you're better off buying an off-the-shelf product. How about the Specialized Enduro SX Trail?



    Good luck.

    Patrick
    Last edited by PCinSC; 07-29-2006 at 07:57 PM.

  7. #7
    Au'Right!
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    The new Kona Coilers have way better stand-over and are floating disk brake capable! check out the 07 line-up!
    Problem: "Bike has trouble going up steep hills."
    Fix: Recommend pressing harder on the pedals.

  8. #8
    The Sentinel
    Reputation: mtnbiker62's Avatar
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    I'm having good luck with my Transition Preston FR

    I'm 5'8" tall, and 240 lbs., and I'm riding a small 2005 Transition Preston FR.

    Earlier this year I decided to step up my riding to include some light freeriding...small drops, ladder bridges, log rides, etc., and I needed a bike that would handle it. After some research, I decided to go with the Preston. So far, I've been really pleased with the choice. It does have a short top tube, so that was a little bit of an adjustment for me, but it does make the bike very responsive and manuverable.

    I built my bike up with pretty heavy duty parts, the Romic rear shock and a 2005 Marzocchi AM-1 up front, and the build came in at 36.5 pounds. I use it for both AM riding and light freeriding, with the only difference being a switch in stems and a switch in the rear travel. I use an 80 mm Sette Stumpy stem with 5" travel in the rear for freeriding, and a 90 mm Rocky Mountain Evolve stem with 4" travel in the rear for AM riding. I pretty much leave the AM-1 in the 150 mm setting regardless of the type of riding I'm doing. The ETA feature helps control the travel on long climbs.

    I hope this is helpful. Kyle and Kevin at Transition are very helpful, and really responsive to questions via e-mail, and I would be glad to answer any questions about my version of their bike as well. Good luck in your search.
    Sworn to avenge, condemned to hell

  9. #9
    long standing member
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker62
    I'm 5'8" tall, and 240 lbs., and I'm riding a small 2005 Transition Preston FR.
    That's interesting. When considering this bike while shopping around the high shock leverage ratio concerned me. I'm a bit heavier than you, I'd be suprised if they even made a coil with a spring rate high enough to work for me with that frame. The OP is around my size, I wonder if it would work for him.

    I guess you're happy with the suspension performance and haven't had any "reliability" issues? It seems like a real cool bike, something that can be tossed around yet is pretty heavy-duty.

    Patrick

  10. #10
    The Sentinel
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    So far, so good

    I'm running an 800 pound spring, which was what the guys at Transition recommended. I guess time will tell, but so far, so good.
    Sworn to avenge, condemned to hell

  11. #11
    Making fat cool since '71
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    FR/All-mountain bikes I've ridden (I'm 6'3" @ 250-ish, 34 inseam, long, long arms): Turner 6-pack/RFX, Yeti ASX, Ellsworth Rogue, Kona Coil-air. They were all good bikes. I didn't have the flex issues I've heard about on the Yeti. My final two choices were the Kona and the Turner. I tend to ride whatever/whenever and I wanted a less "purpose" built bike than the others felt like so I opted for the Turner. It can climb pretty durned well (at least as good as the Heckler it replaced) and is a killer descender. Mine is a a size XL and weighs 32.2 pounds with an air shock and Z1 light and an all-mountain mix of stuff I guess.

    I've not taken anything more than 6' with it, but it has been as close to perfect for me as probably any bike can be. I've done shuttle/free ride days with it with no issues, but more typically for me it's been my all day/epic bike with equal success.

    Having said that, I really liked the Kona as well. Plus it was about $2K cheaper than the Turner and Ellsworth. If I went with an Ellsworth it would probably be the Moment over the Rogue (the Rogue was "overkill" for me), but it sounds like maybe the Rogue would be perfect for you (?). Lots of the FR crowd around here ride and love their Banshee bikes as well. They have a loyal following it seems. Good luck!

    Brock...
    Are the wheels roundish? Ride it.

    Disciples Of Dirt, come ride with us.

  12. #12
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    Check out Norco's line up. Super tough bikes, designed on the Shore, handling so confidence-inspiring that I've seen a number of buddies go from sketchy to stylish in less than a season.

  13. #13
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    banshee scream.
    Quote Originally Posted by Qatarbhoy
    I have to ask for them to do a "Number two" on my head

  14. #14
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    look into a santa cruz vp free. there frickin sweet plus the pedal good.

  15. #15
    livin' large
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    I'm 6'2 and 275lbs and have had tremendous luck with a 05 Rocky Mountain Switch S3, and the 06 have better standover hieght and more travel.

    I find it a great bike for fr/dh and general screwing around. And it can be pressed into All mountain duty with effort or a wheel/tire swap (i like running big tires and wheels cause i'm fricken huge!)
    it tied the room together man!

  16. #16
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    Have a look at the Commencals here. No experience with them, but the suspension design appears to be superior to most (as far as peddal feedback goes).

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