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  1. #1
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    Fork Options for 240 lb all mtn rider?

    Need to upgrade my old shock, that's lasted quite a while. The old one is an '04 Fox Vanilla 125 RL. Riding style is mostly trail with a little (like a couple times a year) downhill stuff mixed in every once in a while (no more than 12"-18" stair-steps would be about as rough as this rig will ever see).

    Geometry of this bike requires between 80-125 mm of travel....but I would like to be at 100 or 120. Head tube angle is 70.5 with 80mm travel; and 68.5 with 120. Though it's a hard tail (has 1" rear travel; but, I consider that a hard tail), I have no trouble with a 69 degree HTA.

    Was thinking of Manitou Minute Pro or Fox Talas 32. Talas is a lot more spendy. Worth it over the Manitou? Any other ideas??

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Swimming thru the Smog
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    Pick up the Fox 32 without talas. Talas is adjustable travel on the fork, which i dont think u would need unless u are running a 150mm + fork. Rock Shox SID would also work.

    Jenson has a great deal on one right now
    Fox 32 F120 RLC Oe '11 at JensonUSA.com

  3. #3
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    And get it PUSHED for sure.
    That will make a huge difference.

    Woody

  4. #4
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    Might check out a Rock Shox Reba...I'd take it or the Manitou Minute Pro

    Getting a 15mm or 20mm front axle and matching fork will make a huge difference for a Clyde if you really want to up the performance.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72 View Post

    Getting a 15mm or 20mm front axle and matching fork will make a huge difference for a Clyde if you really want to up the performance.
    Yep that will make a big difference as well

    Woody

  6. #6
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    My $0.02
    I've been super happy with my Magura Menja. Super stiff, predictable, low maintenance. Nice short travel fork.
    I was gonna stop by and see you, but the Jehovas witnesses came by. When they left I started drinking. Voicemail from Paul

  7. #7
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    So, it's worth it to invest in the new hub as well (current is DT Swiss, 9mm quick release)? I've never had a complaint with the QR......and it's lasted for nearly 8 years.

    New hub (mid-level) will run me an extra $100 or so, plus the unlacing and relacing the rim ......which is oooooooh so fun

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dragoon View Post
    So, it's worth it to invest in the new hub as well (current is DT Swiss, 9mm quick release)? I've never had a complaint with the QR......and it's lasted for nearly 8 years.

    New hub (mid-level) will run me an extra $100 or so, plus the unlacing and relacing the rim ......which is oooooooh so fun
    Absolutely! Coming from another 240 pounder, I just upgraded from a super flexy Piece of junk Dart 3 to a Float FIT 32 at 120mm. This is on a hardtail 29r. The difference in not only the stanchion diameter and going from 9mm qr to 15mm ta was unbelievable.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dragoon View Post
    So, it's worth it to invest in the new hub as well (current is DT Swiss, 9mm quick release)? I've never had a complaint with the QR......and it's lasted for nearly 8 years.

    New hub (mid-level) will run me an extra $100 or so, plus the unlacing and relacing the rim ......which is oooooooh so fun
    What DT Swiss hub?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72 View Post
    What DT Swiss hub?
    Hmmm, not sure. It says DT Swiss Elite. I remember telling my wheel builder to do whatever he wanted. Guess I wasn't too particular back then.

    If I go 15mm, prob. go to Hope Pro II.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by dragoon View Post
    Hmmm, not sure. It says DT Swiss Elite. I remember telling my wheel builder to do whatever he wanted. Guess I wasn't too particular back then.

    If I go 15mm, prob. go to Hope Pro II.
    Checking if it was convertible, but I believe the "Elite" is the Onyx hubs which are not convertible to 15mm. The Hope would be a great choice as it works for 9mm, 15mm, and 20mm.

  12. #12
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    Sorry to thread jack but I am in the same boat....I am 6'8" and around 235lbs. I have a 2010 Trance X4 and the front is way too soft for me. Should I stick with what you guys are saying for dragoon?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by norcalrider View Post
    Sorry to thread jack but I am in the same boat....I am 6'8" and around 235lbs. I have a 2010 Trance X4 and the front is way too soft for me. Should I stick with what you guys are saying for dragoon?
    Well, here's what I've come up with- most forks (excluding hard-core downhill varieties), are pretty much only rated to about 225. So, I suspect that most of the forks not designed only for XC use will probably be as good as anything else. I just bought a new Manitou Minute Pro. It's air-sprung (MARS).

    Does your fork use a spring? If so, I would buy and install the heaviest spring they have. On my old Vanilla, that's what I did. It helped some (but again, as far as I know, nothing is exactly built for our weight)

  14. #14
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    Mine is spring and WAY too soft. What sucks the most is that there is no lock-out...so when I am trying to pump going up-hill I am just working against myself and it pisses me off. I am thinking of just upgrading to exactly what you did or a used Fox fork (I have Fox on my quads and I LOVE it), but will probably stick with new Manitou. I appreciate the input....and again.....I am sorry to thread jack ( I hate that on my other forums!)

  15. #15
    some know me as mongo
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    Of your two option I would go for the Manitou Minute Pro. of the forks on the market I would go for the Rackshox revelation dual air with 20mm Maxle. You will notice a huge difference with the 20mm axle on the front of the bike and with the dual air you can get the fork down to 120mm as well by just adding spacers to it. I have been ridding a revelation team blackbox for just about 2 years now and it is a beast on the trails with up to about 4 foot drops in them.

    for reference I currently weight in at 270 w/o gear and ride pretty hard but like to flow through the trail.

  16. #16
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    How about a Float 36 lowered to 120mm?

  17. #17
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    if within budget, a lefty 110 air sprung works nice for a clyde

    "Well, here's what I've come up with- most forks (excluding hard-core downhill varieties), are pretty much only rated to about 225. So, I suspect that most of the forks not designed only for XC use wi
    ll probably be as good as anything else.".........

    Like another poster, I had a Rock Shox Dart for a brief time and exchanged the entire bike to get into a Lefty equipped 29er. Not sure on the All Mountain part but I weighed about 250 at the time and the fork has held up fine since 2009. Terrain I ride is rocky, rooty Northeast PA.

    If going this route II would suggest sending it to Mendonsmith when due for it s first service or even before installing it ideally. Make sure to mention your body weight and he will change the oil weight. The fork came back from him working better than new from the Cannondale bike shop! Before, it would blow through the travel (fork dive) unless I pumped it up to about 230 or so. Now, I set it around 160psi (smaller me now at 225lbs though) and it is like butter. Expensive to buy new but I see used Lefty's at decent prices from time to time.

    I would recommend a rigid fork over a Dart and I have known fellas that have actually switched the Dart out for rigid forks ranging from used steel rigids to carbon niners even...the Dart I was on was scary!!

    And to throw out something else from left field I should mention that I switched to a rigid fat bike (2012 907) and I don't know if I will ever touch my niner again! My riding partner is also a clyde and we both would just go with full rigid fat bikes knowing what we know now.

  18. #18
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    reading all those posts and thinking that this guy is not being given good advice.

    Then sir crak and doom chirped up.

    The OP said an AM fork. Advising a Clyde who want to ride AM to buy an XC fork?!


    I would say the advice on 20mm is spot on, that is the most important thing! If your wheel will not go where you are pointing it things get hard very fast.


    Any AM fork with a 20mm hub will do you fine, just don't get an XC fork. Do not pay the slightest bit of attention to the weight, compared to you an extra lb on the fork will not slow you down, the added stiffness may even speed you up.

    I ride a WFO with a Dorado for everything. I gave away my road bike as I was faster on road with the WFO. While the road bike flexed, the WFO let me use the power I generate to shift the bike forwards (I do have a set of road wheels for the WFO).

    Interesting to hear the fatbike comments, been tempted to try one.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  19. #19
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    I should add you can never have too much fork, last weekend I snapped 5 hardened steel bolts on my dorado on an 18" jump. I swapped the standard to HS as the stainless ones kept on going. Well HS last a lot longer, but when one goes they all go at once =-)
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

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