Results 1 to 48 of 48
  1. #1
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367

    Fingertip numbness lasts for days, solutions?

    Alright, I had wrists, hand and finger issues when I first got my bike... I got a wider bar and ergon GP1 grips.. the wrist and hand issues are gone, but the numbness in my fingertips, particularly in my thumb-tips and the adjacent pointer finger tips, will not go away for over 2 days after a ride.

    I have been having one type or another of "ride" every day, either on the my bike or Gym bike, but I once went for 2 days without a ride, and the tips were still numb.

    I use a pair of Harbinger weight lifting gloves.. the only thing I can think of is to try some kind of Ulnar nerve shielding gloves, but I'm not sure how helpful that will be, and all that I have tried, with or without gel, seem to feel very flimsy and cheap, and I dont know how they could possibly work.. I have put a bunch, including Pearl Izumi's Gel ones on my hands, but I havent ridden with them. I tried getting the Specialized ones, but #1 they dont sell them online and #2 the only 2 places to sell them around me are charging insane markup, more than MSRP.. which feels like ******** to reward them for.
    Be excellent to each other.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    34
    Best money i ever spent on my bike was for a pro fitting-, no more numbness after that

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    180
    I have issues with numbness too, some changes to bars, stems etc have almost completely cured those.
    Never had it last for days ... bit scary dude
    Think you need to seek a qualified medical person ... or a hand specialist.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    5,434
    Carpal Tunnel maybe? I have it in both hands and it is not from over use but rather over development of my forearms from lifting heavy weights. Since I have stopped lifting for a few years the symptoms have lessened but are still there. I get a lot of numbness as well when riding but it has never lasted very long ofter the ride was over.

  5. #5
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    yea, the numbness from yesterdays ride is still in each of my fingertips on the left hand, even the pinkie. The right hand is a lot better, almost no numbness.

    So, nobody has solved this problem by getting different gloves before?
    Be excellent to each other.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bigtymerider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    206

    Could be your neck angle

    I pinched nerve in my neck once that did the same thing in my hands and ran up into my arms. It may be from the angle of your neck while you ride. Try to get a more angled stem or high rise bars. Just a thought .
    Live Large

  7. #7
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Ok, I just bought these Fox Reflex Gel Short Finger Gloves from PricePoint.



    fingers crossed.
    Be excellent to each other.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    144
    I think most of us have had this problem at some point at varying degrees of severity....but I have never heard of it lasting for days...I am having issues with my new bike causing numbness but the symptoms are gone about 30 mins after the ride.
    The advice to see a Dr. is sound...try the new glove but check it out...could be other things going wrong!

  9. #9
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Doc appointment set for 18th.. I'm a little worried, being a Chernobyl refugee, I do have hypothyroidism, which is very linked with CTS (carpel tunnel syndrome). I guess I'm hoping its not the worst.

    The tips of my thumb, pointer, and middle finger are at varying degrees of numbness, the thumb the worst, and the last time I rode was yesterday, which ended at 7:05. My right hand has completely recovered, but my left has this never-leaving numbness.

    At least its not spreading..

    Really think I should stop biking & spinning till I see the doc on 18th?
    Be excellent to each other.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    180
    If you can survive Chernobyl you can survive anything i think ... doctor is a good idea no matter what the answer. Unless he advises you to take up golf instead of riding the bike
    NO riding ...you should do everything possible to protect your hands.

  11. #11
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    This royally sucks.. yesterday was the first day I hadnt ridden one bike or another in 2 & 1/2 months. Now I get to sit back and think about how all my bike riding is in jeopardy, while I wait for my appointment.
    Be excellent to each other.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    5,434
    Could you still do some light hands free spinning? At least that way you'll keep your legs in shape. Better than nothin' I'd guess.

  13. #13
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster
    Could you still do some light hands free spinning? At least that way you'll keep your legs in shape. Better than nothin' I'd guess.
    You mean.. am I willing to be the guy in spinning class that doesnt get up when the class starts climbing a hill? ... I might have to be. But good thing you mentioned that, I already do spinning, I just didnt think about doing it without getting up. Or maybe I can learn to use one hand.
    Be excellent to each other.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    144
    Yeah...spinning isnt like being outside on a MTB...but just get yourself positioned behind that hottie with the blond hai and try to catch her!!
    Let us know what the Dr. says...I would like to know.
    thanks

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    180
    "... get yourself positioned behind that hottie with the blond hair and try to catch her!! "

    that's what i like about cyclists, always up for a challenge no matter how impossible it might seem

    If any little roadie weeds give you a tough time about riding hands free tell them it's something that Lance does .... then rip their arms off and smash them with the sticky end ... be careful not to hurt your hands of course.


  16. #16
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Thanks all for the advice.. already set myself up in view of the pretty girls, but the cool thing is, there is a huge floor-wall mirror in front of the class.. and when we're pushing it, I look into the mirror at them, beam a smile, and see which one beams back Then they do this thing with brushing their hair behind their ear, its cute.. a bloody game of cat & mouse!

    I had a good day yesterday. Read more into hypothyrodic and carpal relationship, it said the doctors first give a higher dose of the hormone to see if all the person needs is more.. and I decided to experiment on myself, took 1.5x the normal amount of levothyroxin, and bingo, my fingers have begun to regain feeling, numbness is subsiding, but the thumb is still numb. I know it takes 2-3 weeks for a levothyroxin regimen to take full effect, as it did when I first started, so I'll wait that long.. but it was really uplifting to see results the first 2 days I upped my own hormone dose.
    Last edited by The Red; 06-10-2009 at 07:15 AM.
    Be excellent to each other.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    5,434
    Since I have been riding more my thumb and first two fingers go numb pretty quickly while riding and is pretty uncomfortable. I try changing hand positions and no help. I am hoping that it is something that will go away after I ride more but several years ago I underwent the testing for carpal tunnel and I was diagnosed with it in both hands. I was scheduled for surgery but had to cancel and then I left my job so I had to wait a year on my new insurance before they would cover it and then I left that job, went back to the new job and had to wait another year. But by this time I had stopped lifting weights and lost some size in my arms which is what was causing my CT anyways and it seemed that the symptoms were lessening so I never rescheduled surgery. Well, I left that job again and now I am going to school full time and working part time so I don't have insurance now and the pain and numbness are back since I starting biking. So I am not sure what I am going to do at this point other than just see what happens and deal with it for the next 3 years I am in school and then I will return to the work force full time and have insurance again and I can get it taken care of then. I guess luckily my pain and numbness don't last and I can actually shake it out while riding so my issue may not even be CT related, possibly decreased blood flow or something do to the angle of my wrists or the pressure being placed on my hands/wrists since I am able to give them a quick shake out and regain the feeling.

  18. #18
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster
    Since I have been riding more my thumb and first two fingers go numb pretty quickly while riding and is pretty uncomfortable. I try changing hand positions and no help. I am hoping that it is something that will go away after I ride more but several years ago I underwent the testing for carpal tunnel and I was diagnosed with it in both hands. I was scheduled for surgery but had to cancel and then I left my job so I had to wait a year on my new insurance before they would cover it and then I left that job, went back to the new job and had to wait another year. But by this time I had stopped lifting weights and lost some size in my arms which is what was causing my CT anyways and it seemed that the symptoms were lessening so I never rescheduled surgery. Well, I left that job again and now I am going to school full time and working part time so I don't have insurance now and the pain and numbness are back since I starting biking. So I am not sure what I am going to do at this point other than just see what happens and deal with it for the next 3 years I am in school and then I will return to the work force full time and have insurance again and I can get it taken care of then. I guess luckily my pain and numbness don't last and I can actually shake it out while riding so my issue may not even be CT related, possibly decreased blood flow or something do to the angle of my wrists or the pressure being placed on my hands/wrists since I am able to give them a quick shake out and regain the feeling.
    Scary man.. I know when I first got it, I worried quite a bit, and even got depressed, thinking I'll be barred from biking for a long time. Who knows, I still might be. As for school.. yours did not require insurance? .. I'm leaving work in a month and a half for a trip to NZ and then immediately starting school at end of august.. my school required me to be insured and when I told them I wasnt going to be they said they provide discounted insurance through the school.. but that it was mandatory for me to have SOME health insurance and that I couldnt be un-insured on campus.

    I spent a year without health insurance before.. was not pleasant to think about before deciding to do some fun things... ie: What if I crash on Buffalo ice, what if I get in a fight, what if she has herpes.. etc..
    Be excellent to each other.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    5,434
    Nope, not required. They do offer fairly cheap insurance though, I just have not fully checked into it yet. I know I need to have it, especially if I go anywhere with this mountain biking cause I am bound to get hurt sooner or later, likely sooner. I do want to try some gel gloves to see if that offers any relief. My gloves are lightly padded but not gel. I may check into the full finger version of the gloves you ordered from price point. I just order shoes and pedals (clipless) from them, I wish I was thinking I would have ordered the gloves at the same time to save on shipping.

  20. #20
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster
    Nope, not required. They do offer fairly cheap insurance though, I just have not fully checked into it yet. I know I need to have it, especially if I go anywhere with this mountain biking cause I am bound to get hurt sooner or later, likely sooner. I do want to try some gel gloves to see if that offers any relief. My gloves are lightly padded but not gel. I may check into the full finger version of the gloves you ordered from price point. I just order shoes and pedals (clipless) from them, I wish I was thinking I would have ordered the gloves at the same time to save on shipping.
    They are due in on the 17th, I'll report to you if theyre any good. I'm also using just padded but not gel gloves. Harbinger weight lifting gloves.. also fingerless. I just like the feel of fingerless.
    Be excellent to each other.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    25
    The numbness monster was hitting me pretty hard too. A combination of three things helped -
    1- Better Bar ends (Ergon GX2)
    2- New bar with some rise to it
    3- New glove with LESS padding (planet bike - aeries)

    I've tried lifting gloves, and the only difference was that they dye ran and turned my hands black.

    You definitely want to address the numbness, but your body will recover. I rode ragbrai last year (470 rroad miles on a mtb bike) and had numbness in 3 fingers on my left hand. My pinky and ring finger took 3-4 months to recover.

    My biggest issue was bike bit. I'm 6'3 with long torso and short legs. MTB's are a hard fit for me. I just picked up a Salsa Fargo the fit is GREAT for me. Much more comfortable and the drops are great for comfort. I haven't used them offroad yet, but I'm looking forward to see what the hell happens. I could see myself switching off the stock bar to a midge, or whatever salsa is cooking up for off road drops.

  22. #22
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Well.. I broke down, put short bar ends on my mtb, and rode 13.15 paved miles. My thumb is numb now and my other 2 fingers are in different stages of numb. Ha.

    The bar ends didnt help much. Especially since I lowered my bar rise by rotating it towards me, which was stupid, its going back up tomorrow.

    Is it just me or can no-one else find the right way to use the Ergon GP1s? I mean, theres just no effin guide anywhere on what the proper position is. My hands either slip off the GP1s while riding, or I get them where my hands just barely dont slip at all, but are numb after I ride... am I missing something? .. should I be angling them parallel with the ground or angled down or something?
    Be excellent to each other.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    180
    i have mine angled up at about 30 degrees ... try it and be prepared to adjust them a lot .PITA but worth it

  24. #24
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by the old fool
    i have mine angled up at about 30 degrees ... try it and be prepared to adjust them a lot .PITA but worth it
    I'll give anything a try. I'm raising the bar and changing the grip angle to your suggestion. I tried to eliminate all wrist bend and ended up slipping off.. so I'll increase my wrist bend to as high an angle as comfortable and see what happens...

    I think I should remove the bar ends too, I'm not liking riding with them.. just feel so restricted and they didnt seem to help my hands. My handlebar looks like a mess too.

    Maybe I should have ordered the GP1s in small.. but cant return to store since I ordered through them and not from them, they didnt normally sell em... oh well. live, learn, ride till hamstrings are like violin strings.
    Be excellent to each other.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    25
    As you adjust keep in mind that what you're trying to do it provide a wider and flatter area for your palm to rest on. So your preferred angle could be unique to you and your bike.

  26. #26
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    The gloves are here. I have ridden with them for 2 days, and have gone to the gym spinning class with them. They made A LOT of difference. Big (less numb) thumbs up from me, as my first Fox product. My fingers are still getting numb though, but nowhere near the point they use to get to, and that includes the good hand. My doc appointment is this thursday, the 18th.. I'll keep you informed. I fear I'll be asked to stop biking for a while till a full sensation recovery.. and I truthfully didnt realize how hard it would be to give up, when you think you have gone without for nearly a decade before and try and return to that state..
    Be excellent to each other.

  27. #27
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Ok.. back from the doc. He thinks I'm doing something to cause swelling near the nerves and that the fact that it doesnt happen to my other hand is no indicator, because we're not built perfectly symmetrical and wrists differ inside of one person too.

    He wants me to try using ibuprofen after or during rides, and adjusting my grips without trying to make them perfectly alike, but rather to the comfort of each hand individually.

    I'll report any progress. The gloves themselves helped a lot.. my fingers never recover completely, but without the gloves it took 3 days to get to the point of where my fingers get in 1 day *with* the new gloves.
    Be excellent to each other.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    5,434
    Great news that the doc didn't tell you to stop riding. Hopefully you figure this out so you can ride numbness free. I rode a couples mile today trying out my new clipless setup and my hands took longer to go numb so maybe in my case I just need to build up a tolerance so to speak. My numbness goes away almost as soon as I get off the bike though so I think mine case is just pressure on the nerve or lack of blood flow making my fingers "go to sleep".

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    626
    The news from the doc sounds good.

    I used to get hand pain, then I got a new fork which was more plush and allowed me to raise the handle bars by keeping the steerer tube longer than on the original fork. The original Fork was a Manitou Axel, upgraded to a Rockshox 318 air. The Tora definitely decreased the beating my hands were taking. Raising the bars decreased the weight I was putting on them.

    What sort of fork are you running now? If it is something entry level, a new fork might help, though it is a somewhat expensive way to go.

  30. #30
    Mouth-Breather / Huffer
    Reputation: dog.gone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    650
    Yes, good news indeed! I hope you can find a long-term solution soon.

    I gotta admit that I love, love, LOVE my Ergons. I chose to go with the GR2s with the little barends. I'm shocked at how frequently I use the barends - yes, I know that barends are passe around these parts - but I find them to be exceptionally useful when it comes to varying my hand positions, as well as when I need a little more leverage.

    After looking more closely at my personal setup of the Ergons, I did notice that each grip is setup differently. I didn't intend for this to happen, but after fiddling with things the first few rides, I just locked them into place when I felt I had found the sweet spot without considering whether were setup in an identical manner. It works well for me...

  31. #31
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Took my Doc's suggestion and went to a bigger shop for suggestions, they had a lot more stems and put on this $40 Specialized stem.. the rise is HIGH and its a bit shorter.. it doesnt feel like an mtb anymore and thats got me upset. I'm riding way too upright. But it IS super comfy... /sigh

    Just how bad is it to be too upright? and whats the point of too upright? anyone?

    I'm going to see if they have an in-between stem with less rise.. but that stem pretty much solved my problem. My hands recovered to their pre-ride state in a few hours. Even though that state was still numbness in 3.5 fingers on my left hand. The fact that I took 2 ibuprofen before the ride probably helped too.
    Be excellent to each other.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    626
    Don't a lot of downhill/trail bikes put you in a more up-right position than cross country bikes? What bike are you on currently?

    Any new positions is going to feel strange at first, but you may get to like it after a couple of weeks. On the other hand, if the shop will swap stems with you until you find the right one, maybe you could find one a little lower that still relieves your probs.
    new stem at least a couple of weeks, you may get used to it an

  33. #33
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by tenbsmith
    Don't a lot of downhill/trail bikes put you in a more up-right position than cross country bikes? What bike are you on currently?

    Any new positions is going to feel strange at first, but you may get to like it after a couple of weeks. On the other hand, if the shop will swap stems with you until you find the right one, maybe you could find one a little lower that still relieves your probs.
    new stem at least a couple of weeks, you may get used to it an
    I'm on an '08 Haro Escape Sport.. this thing stick into the air on a sharp angle.. I feel like I'm too close to upright when riding.. but I have been going for a few months with with a really long and small angle stem. I dont know how to get use to it. Its a lot more upright, my legs dont feel robbed of power but get tired quicker it seem than when I was leaning forward.. is there a reason?

    What are the advantages or downsides of either? .. I've seen the DH stuff, short stems and angled, this one is on the high angle but medium length (I think 100mm) side.
    Be excellent to each other.

  34. #34
    Clydeosaur
    Reputation: super_fly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    88
    Hey Red,

    I forget where I read it but I read with the ergon GP-1 grips that you want your forearm/hand/wrist to be level all the way down. So I have the wide part angled up so that my hands are in a straight line all the way down. Seems to make sense and I noticed something after the shop put my new stem on. They angled the bars back so the grips were horizontal. My hands were numb after a couple of mile ride. So it seemed to make a difference. I'm going to angle them back the way I had it and see how it goes on my next ride.

  35. #35
    Mouth-Breather / Huffer
    Reputation: dog.gone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    650

    Ergon Grip Positioning

    Quote Originally Posted by super_fly
    I forget where I read it but I read with the ergon GP-1 grips that you want your forearm/hand/wrist to be level all the way down.
    My GR2s are setup in a similar manner (with minute differences between the right and left grip).

  36. #36
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    That sounds like a smart idea, I'm going to give it a shot.. I've been angling them all sorts of ways and not sure what position they are in now.

    I'm going to try and get a bit lower angle stem.
    Be excellent to each other.

  37. #37
    56-year-old teenager
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,763
    What super_fly said. Ergons are great but you have to set them up so the wrist is in a neutral angle. I suggest you keep the bars UP.

    I also have wrist issues from working with computers all the time. I've experimented a lot and finally found a setup that is near perfect for me. The solution was to get the weight off my hands as much as possible. My bike is set up with the saddle set back, wide 2" (50mm) riser bars with a lot of sweep, lots of spacers under the stem, Ergon grips, etc. It looks like a downhill setup, but I can ride XC all day without my hands going numb.

    Learn to ride with relaxed hands too. A death grip on the bars is murder on wrists. Set up your brakes for single-finger braking - go with bigger rotors if you can.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    626
    I like Chucko's suggestions about single finger braking and relasing your grip. Single fingre braking may be difficult if you don't have hydraulic disk brakes. I know relaxing my grip was something I had to really focus on to achieve, and I still periodically check in on it during longer rides, thinking about my hands and maintaining a firm but light grip.

    The disadvantage of being more upright is that you are less aerodynamic and have more wind resistance, which might make you tired faster. You may also have to use more core muscles to support yourself, as opposed to just leaning on your hands--sits ups, crunches, stuff like that can help.

    I'm not sure why downhill/all mountain bikes have more upright positions. I think partly b/c it is more comfortable, and maybe it gives you more ability to move your weight around on the bike in technical terrain.

  39. #39
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    17,914
    Road bikes have a super-low riding position because it facilitates a high power output, good breathing and low air resistance.

    DH bikes have a really upright position because when you're pointed down the hill it turns into a well-balanced position. Point something with a road-like position down a steep hill and you'll endo as soon as you hit something.

    For a trail bike, it's all about balance. There is such a thing as too upright - if your back tends to arch, whenever the rear wheel hits something the saddle will arch your back more, and most people don't have the range of motion to take much of that without getting pretty banged up. So if you're arching your back when you ride, like you should be when you're standing or sitting upright or walking around, your bars are too high or too close. I had mine just far enough away to make me arch. That position is the most comfortable I've ever been riding mountain bikes.

    If you can't find a good position for your handlebars, think about something with an extreme sweep angle, like some of those funky On-One bars or the Titec H-bends or something. Do ab work every morning, or at least before you ride. That also helps keep the weight off your hands.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    5,434
    Does anyone have a picture or a link to a picture of someone in proper XC riding position? I think I am a bit too far bent over but not sure. I would say by the pressure on my hands I am at least slightly.

  41. #41
    56-year-old teenager
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,763
    "Proper" riding position varies with rider build, fitness, terrain, bike geometry... etc.

    You should not have to put any weight on your hands when riding on flat and level ground. One thing I found out from the touring bike folks: if you are putting too much weight on your hands, try moving your saddle back first. Then play with bar height and/or stem length.

    In more technical riding, your weight should be carried by the pedals, not the saddle. Bikes are designed to handle best when your weight goes through the bottom bracket.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  42. #42
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    17,914
    Quote Originally Posted by chucko58
    You should not have to put any weight on your hands when riding on flat and level ground. One thing I found out from the touring bike folks: if you are putting too much weight on your hands, try moving your saddle back first. Then play with bar height and/or stem length.

    In more technical riding, your weight should be carried by the pedals, not the saddle. Bikes are designed to handle best when your weight goes through the bottom bracket.
    My bikes seem to get a bit twitchy if I have no weight at all on my hands. But if I want to stay in my same riding position and take my hands off the bars, I can - I just have to make my platform and engage my back a little more. If taking your hands off your bars means you do a faceplant into your stem, you've got too much weight there.

    Be a little careful about adjusting your saddle to correct problems not related to your knees. If you have flaky knees, as I do, moving the saddle to correct a problem elsewhere on the bike can open up a whole can of worms.

    Bear in mind that cross-country bikes tend to have a steeper head tube, which means a twitchier front wheel than a cruiser or downhill bike. There's a similar difference between road racing and touring bikes. So too much weight on the hands is a very likely culprit, but you may not be able to remove all of it and continue to ride aggressively.

    Bad vibes contribute too. Try setting your front tire to a lower pressure. Do you have a suspension fork? Is it tunable?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  43. #43
    My Brain Hurts!
    Reputation: ProfGumby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    699
    Quote Originally Posted by The Red
    yea, the numbness from yesterdays ride is still in each of my fingertips on the left hand, even the pinkie. The right hand is a lot better, almost no numbness.

    So, nobody has solved this problem by getting different gloves before?
    With my old Schwinn Varsity, I used better gloves, and I even wrapped the handlebars with pipe insulation and a tape that bonds to itself so the foam wouldn't slip and I could still maneuver the bike. What I have found since is it was my riding posture and putting too much weight on the bars that was causing my problem. That and the old gorilla grip O' death I used on the handlebars. Though the numbness never lasted anywhere near as long as you are experiencing.

    Perhaps you need to seek a medical evaluation and a pro setup to be sure you are positioning yourself properly on your bike? Maybe over time this issue has caused a higher level of injury?

    Here is hoping you find some answers and better comfort while riding...and after...
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

  44. #44
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    My problem is mostly solved, my fingers are still numb but only on the very tips. After I got a Specialized stem with a lot of rise, my position changed, the weight came off my hands, and I got it basically one week after my Fox Gel gloves.. and then I adjusted the Ergon GP1s like suggested, so my forearm forms a flat line towards the ground, no bends... all 3 combined to rides where my hands felt marginally numb, then recovered to their previous state within the first hour of getting off the bike (a big improvement)... I'm hoping the numbness goes away entirely eventually, but the top of my thumb (the last1 cm) has never fully recovered since day 1.. I might be out of luck.

    Taking ibuprofen and hot showers helped a lot.. I think the doc was right, it had to do with swelling. The numb thumb is messing with me though.. hard to pick up change off the desk / floor.. and I wont even think about smaller stuff like needles.
    Be excellent to each other.

  45. #45
    56-year-old teenager
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,763
    I'm glad to hear you're making progress! Also try icing your wrists right after the ride.

    Ibuprofen ("Vitamin I") is OK for occasional use, but I would hesitate to use it on a regular basis without a doctor's recommendation. And even if an MD says to do it, I'd still want to wean off it ASAP. It's better to eliminate the causes of the inflammation.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  46. #46
    I'll take you there.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by chucko58
    I'm glad to hear you're making progress! Also try icing your wrists right after the ride.

    Ibuprofen ("Vitamin I") is OK for occasional use, but I would hesitate to use it on a regular basis without a doctor's recommendation. And even if an MD says to do it, I'd still want to wean off it ASAP. It's better to eliminate the causes of the inflammation.
    You are correct sir. I've taken "Vitamin I" far too much in my youth.. years of martial arts and late nights with intense headaches... if I take it for 3 days in a row now, I bleed internally. I think its stomach ulceration.

    I'll try the ice thing for when I cant get a hot shower.
    Be excellent to each other.

  47. #47
    56-year-old teenager
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,763
    Quote Originally Posted by The Red
    I'll try the ice thing for when I cant get a hot shower.
    I'd suggest you try it before taking the hot shower. Cold reduces inflammation, and the inflammation is what pinches the nerves and arteries and makes your fingers numb.

    Alternating hot/cold soaks are sometimes recommended for computer users with RSI.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  48. #48
    Slave to the grind
    Reputation: cherrybomber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    517
    Quote Originally Posted by LateBrakeU2
    Best money i ever spent on my bike was for a pro fitting-, no more numbness after that

    +1

    padded gloves alleviate the symptoms but does not address the cause
    Let it flow, let yourself go, slow and low, that is the tempo.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •