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  1. #1
    11 is one louder than 10
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    Fellow fat guys losing weight - the challenge - riding, or eating?

    Obviously as I've gotten older (35 friday) had more kids, more responsiblity etc ride time has been cut back a bit.

    That said, when I'm not on the road for work I do a pretty good job getting out and riding, and hitting it hard. I'm fast for a fat guy, no doubt.

    I'm really finding my food disipline really goes in waves now. I can be good for a few days, but I honestly really just like to eat, everything from steak to pizza, cookies etc.

    I know when stressed, my reaction is to eat crap food. I don't drink a ton of beer anymore (though tailgaiting season is here...) but my bigger problem is that I just like to eat.

    When I was younger, I could really stay disciplined for a while. Now, once I'm off the wagon, it's bad.

    Any tips? keeping healthy foods around helps, but when I'm on the road for business (I'm in sales) damn it sucks. It's not so much grabbing a handful of almonds to tide over hunger. It's grabbing food because I like the damn stuff.

    I've contemplated doing something rather ridiculous and taking a picture of myself with my shirt off and keeping it in my wallet.

    It's funny, when I was younger I had a hard time studying or working and having that disipline, now my wife says I'm a workaholic (pretty true), but the reverse is true on eating. I used to have disipline, now it wanes!!!
    "The thing is, Bob, it's not that I'm lazy, it's that I just don't care."

  2. #2
    2weelTom
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    Unless you have a medical condition, it's all a mind issue. Once you've got that straight then the rest is a lot easier. Grab a "Body for Life" book and read it. Bill Phillips has been through what we've all encountered. (I've just lost over 30 lbs in six months.) What you don't want to do is go on a 'diet'. Get the mind set that you're going to alter you eating style ever so slightly. You don't want to lose more than a pound a week. And after a certain point you'll maintain that weight that your body adjusted to for those given calories you took in.

    You will still want to have the occassional treat like pizza, ice cream, etc.. and that's a good thing. Just don't eat the whole pizza and when you're done don't feel guilty about it. The next feeding will be the 'good food' and I'm not talking celery either. You want to adjust your carbs (simple and complex), protien and fat intake. You need them all. This Atkins diet will never work in the long run because the carbs, the good ones, are the ones that give you the energy to function and ride your bike. And the Atkins is all based on protien. You will need to eat small meals 6-7 times a day. What I did was take what I would eat for the 3 main meals we're accustomed to and cut that in half or a third and save the rest for 2 hours later. You see, you don't want your metabolism to think it's being starved because then everything you take in will be stored as fat. If you continually eat then your body will know there's more coming soon. The sceintific part is that your body will be controlling the sugars that you take in on a level field and not be spiking all the time. It'll take about 20-30 days for it to kick in, but once it does, hold on.

    As for on the road food, I pack a cooler and put everything I need in it. I don't eat out (much). I make a lot of Meal Replacement drinks in shakers and put them on ice. Up your consumption of water to about a gallon or more a day.

    It's all in the mind...

  3. #3
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    treading water

    Dont forget the gains of breaking even. On the road, and when things get difficult try to go halfway to your healthy eating. Loose your weight at home and just concentrate on not gaining much weight on the road.

    Eating quick is hard (double hard when you are stressed for time), so find out what things you really like that arent too bad. I do Wendy's since I can get a salad, some chili and a small burger for 3-4 bucks. Thats not too bad considering the salad and the chili dont net you much weight gain, and you will be full after it. I also do places that have rice dishes since I like those, and subway of course. Always eat something that has a little fat in it that way you feel satisfied, just stay away from superfat stuff. If you do eat a trim meal like your supposed to eat a cookie or brownie with it. That way you get less cravings late in the day since you gave into them already and used the energy (which is key).

    biggest killer = Pop and energy drinks. Just drink water, and then some more water. Even most juices have the same makeup as pop. Try not drinking stuff with corn syrup in it. You'll realize how little difference there is between mountain dew and most apple juice. I treat drinks like that as a snack or dessert instead of just part of the meal. Drink water with the meal and if your still craving it after you probably need the sugar or something.

  4. #4
    Fat guy on a bike
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    I'm definitely in the same boat. I have solved my problem by sticking to a cyclic-ketogenic-diet. Thats Atkins for athletes in layman terms. However, unlike Atkins, you have weekly or bi-weekly carb-up sessions.

    Benefits are:

    1. You can eat, a lot really, but you will find that you are not as hungry as you would think you would be. Your metabolism, while burning fat as primary energy source, tends to reduce hunger!

    2. No more energy spikes and crashes. You know the routine, you eat a bagel and drink some coffee, feel great for a while, and then you crash, making you want to eat more and get some caffeine.

    3. Weight-loss is substantial. I am aiming for 4-5 pounds a week.

    4. You won't burn off your muscle also. With correct post workout supplementation (whey + dextrose) will prevent your body from eating its own muscles. Carb-ups weekends help stimulate muscle growth by giving your body better fuels to build muscles.

    5. Carb up weekends are effing awesome! You get to chowdown on pizza, ice cream, and whatnot with abandon!

  5. #5
    flying fatass
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    i dont know if this will help too much or not, but when i fell hungy, i ride my bike...surprisingly, when im done riding, im not hungry (or as hungry) anymore...and if you try it eat less for a long period of time (if i remember right) your stomach will shrink and you will get full eating less food...

    i am portly for my age/size 15 years old, 5'10" (close to 5'11" though) 210 pounds...this method works for me anywway...
    Quote Originally Posted by BeaverTail
    Should your balls sit in front of the saddle or on the saddle? Im a bit confused.

  6. #6
    Captain Underpants
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    My experience is a bit different. I cut out all process carbs, including bread, limit alchohol and eat protein and carbs at each meal (what is known as the "paleo" diet). When I eat this way I drop at least a pound a week. I also limit eating when I am stressed (as I teach elementary school this is no mean feat).

    Alchohol is the biggest impediment to losing weight, with processed carbs second.

    PS: I have tried ALL diets . . for me, this works best.

    Atkins is NOT viable long term--short term, for sure. Neither is Vegetarianism or the BFL diet. I have done all of them. The BFL diet really only works when you follow Bill's workout program and use Myoplex, or some other protein powder. It is not a bad plan, certainly far better than 90% of the diets out there, but it and the associated strength program are not sustainable, and will lead to overtraining.

  7. #7
    2weelTom
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    Green Giant, these people have given you some very good advice. Limiting any alcohol intake is very important as it does slow down your metabolism. Any processed foods especially with white flour such as bread (sour dough seems to be the best if you need it) should be very limited in fact you'll find you will use none and go to a ww wrap every now and then. Now pasta in portions is good like speghetti just watch what you put with it.

    As for the BFL change, Bill does suggest pre and post drinks, but if you take the overall picture of what he's trying to tell you and tailor that to what you can live with, it'll work out just fine. I do drink protein mixes just so I don't have to eat food to get it and it is really convenient. It's amazing the recipes you'll come up with after a while. Use more spices to perk up the flavor of some foods. Complex carbs like oatmeal will stick with you longer than simple ones like the bagel scenerio. Remember, you're trying to balance your bodys secretion of insulin so you don't have those spikes and valleys.


    And drink water!

  8. #8
    On MTBR hiatus :(
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    My accidental diet:

    My big weight loss in '03 (~35 pounds) practically melted off of me, at a time of year that I wasn't riding, and skiing perhaps once every other week. It was totally accidental. I was rapidly approaching 240 pounds.

    All coincidentally:
    - I began working swings. This took away my "breakfast at McDonalds" routine.
    - This also caused me to stop eating before going to bed. Dinner (last meal) was around 7pm; bedtime was around midnight.
    - I started walking the facility twice per shift. These normal rounds couldn't have accounted for more than two non-strenuous miles.
    - About the same time, I learned how many calories are in a Frappicino. I switched to coffee only (and no, I don't mean "coffee only diet," just no more froo-froo drinks at Starbucks).
    - Also about that time, I read something about food choices at the drive thru. Gone were burgers and shakes. One chicken soft taco, no sauce, is 170 fairly healthy calories.

    Honestly, when I dropped below 230, I thought maybe I was sick. But I felt great, and kept feeling better. It kept rolling right on down to about 205, about 3-4 months total.

    My wife was impressed (envious?) enough that she began cooking weight watcher recipies, which I find to be nicely proportioned, filling, balanced, and superfluous stupid sauces and stupid ingredients. Much tastier than those overly salty, overpriced frozen affairs for toting along to work.

    Now the ironic thing is that I was a stronger rider back then than I am today, but I attribute that to fewer long rides over the past two years (work 'n stuff). However, I've been able to keep the weight at the 210 mark and below. Although riding (and skiing/boarding) plays a role, I am convince diet and day-to-day habits play the major role.

    I've just come to terms with that recently, and am curious if, with a renewed commitment to more four hour rides, I can finally sink below the two-hundred mark.
    speedub.nate
    MTBR Hiatus UFN

  9. #9
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    Self-control is key. I just quit eating red meat and poultryfor a year (well, I am a month into it) and I don't really miss it. Finding substitutes is easy, but really eat everything that is green and don't eat processed foods. No white bread products/refined sugar. Limit dairy (unless you like to be as big as a cow).

    Good rule of thumb: Don't eat anything invented in the last 50 years.

    Motivation:
    Living longer to see your kids graduate highschool/college
    Easier, longer rides because you have the muscles built.
    Sexier body for the wife.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedub.Nate
    My accidental diet:

    My big weight loss in '03 (~35 pounds) practically melted off of me, at a time of year that I wasn't riding, and skiing perhaps once every other week. It was totally accidental. I was rapidly approaching 240 pounds.

    All coincidentally:
    - I began working swings. This took away my "breakfast at McDonalds" routine.
    - This also caused me to stop eating before going to bed. Dinner (last meal) was around 7pm; bedtime was around midnight.
    - I started walking the facility twice per shift. These normal rounds couldn't have accounted for more than two non-strenuous miles.
    - About the same time, I learned how many calories are in a Frappicino. I switched to coffee only (and no, I don't mean "coffee only diet," just no more froo-froo drinks at Starbucks).
    - Also about that time, I read something about food choices at the drive thru. Gone were burgers and shakes. One chicken soft taco, no sauce, is 170 fairly healthy calories.

    Honestly, when I dropped below 230, I thought maybe I was sick. But I felt great, and kept feeling better. It kept rolling right on down to about 205, about 3-4 months total.

    My wife was impressed (envious?) enough that she began cooking weight watcher recipies, which I find to be nicely proportioned, filling, balanced, and superfluous stupid sauces and stupid ingredients. Much tastier than those overly salty, overpriced frozen affairs for toting along to work.

    Now the ironic thing is that I was a stronger rider back then than I am today, but I attribute that to fewer long rides over the past two years (work 'n stuff). However, I've been able to keep the weight at the 210 mark and below. Although riding (and skiing/boarding) plays a role, I am convince diet and day-to-day habits play the major role.

    I've just come to terms with that recently, and am curious if, with a renewed commitment to more four hour rides, I can finally sink below the two-hundred mark.
    That is my main problem Frappicinos they are like crack to me. I'm scared to look at how many calories are in them since i have about 4 week. I've started eating alot healthier but that is my one bad habit I cannot brake.

  11. #11
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
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    Quote Originally Posted by wadegreene
    That is my main problem Frappicinos they are like crack to me. I'm scared to look at how many calories are in them since i have about 4 week. I've started eating alot healthier but that is my one bad habit I cannot brake.
    Get the frappi-lite, they use low-cal low-fat base instead. Soy- instead of milk, splenda instead of sugar. leave out the flavor syrup too if you can. I like the green tea frappies and they're way to sweet for me when they include the melon syrup (why is it added at all?)

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by wadegreene
    That is my main problem Frappicinos they are like crack to me. I'm scared to look at how many calories are in them since i have about 4 week. I've started eating alot healthier but that is my one bad habit I cannot brake.
    http://www.starbucks.com/retail/nutr...ison_popup.asp

    I hope it is not the Vanillas that pack 430cals, 14g fat!~

  13. #13
    Rollin' on 29s!
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    For me it is definitely food control. I've lost about 50 lbs just from riding without changing my diet, although a bit has started coming back since I haven't ridden as much as I'd like to this summer or past winter.

    My biggest problem is going out to lunch every day at work. I know it's so bad for you, but it is just nice to get out of the office. I need to find a way to do that, but still eat better than I do. I know, what I order at the restuarants will help, but even the healthy choices are sometime not so great. Plus, portions are usually so big, and if I'm paying for it and its in front of me, I have a hard time not eating it.

    Another problem I have, is being single, it is just such a pain in the arse to cook for myslef, and it's not something I like doing. I think what I need to do is just start incrementally making changes along the path to better eating, rather than thinking I need to make all of these changes at once, which seems impossible, so I never do it. My plan is to make baby steps along the path and just get comfortable with a better lifestyle. Sigh...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    http://www.starbucks.com/retail/nutr...ison_popup.asp

    I hope it is not the Vanillas that pack 430cals, 14g fat!~
    Ahh, the Venti Mocha Lite I get is around 210cals I guess thats not too bad compared to some of the other drinks i saw. Thanks for the link.

  15. #15
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    Can the booze and processed foods! Get on "The Paleo Diet for Athletes". It works for me! I dropped about 20 lbs since last november. Tweaking it for hard training is the tricky part. I was as high as 246 at one point. Since I started riding again I lost some weight but hovered around 215. When I adopted the Paleo thing I was 217. I started to see results at a REALISTIC rate. I am 194 right now and expect to be 180 or below by April 2008.

  16. #16
    Captain Underpants
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    Good job! Excellent resource

    Quote Originally Posted by iamrocketman
    Can the booze and processed foods! Get on "The Paleo Diet for Athletes". It works for me! I dropped about 20 lbs since last november. Tweaking it for hard training is the tricky part. I was as high as 246 at one point. Since I started riding again I lost some weight but hovered around 215. When I adopted the Paleo thing I was 217. I started to see results at a REALISTIC rate. I am 194 right now and expect to be 180 or below by April 2008.
    That is a great book by Cordain. Highly reccomended. Pretty much the diet I follow, with the exception of the occasional mocha I find that when I eat paleo I eat less but still feel full, given that the diet includes a reasonable amount of protein and fat. I also like the diet (lifestyle, really) because Cordain focuses on the real culprit--which is NOT protein or fat--but processed carbs, stuff we are not designed to eat. Not at this point in our evolutionary history, anyway.

    He also includes some useful diet tips for those that compete in endurance races.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikepro
    Another problem I have, is being single, it is just such a pain in the arse to cook for myslef, and it's not something I like doing. I think what I need to do is just start incrementally making changes along the path to better eating, rather than thinking I need to make all of these changes at once, which seems impossible, so I never do it. My plan is to make baby steps along the path and just get comfortable with a better lifestyle. Sigh...
    You hit the nail on the head. Make small changes. Learn to cook one meal (something as simples as a small steak with some steamed broccoli) and make that twoice a week for 2-3 weeks. After that, come up with a second meal that you can cook, and up your cooking to three times a week. Do this, and you wil be cooking in no time . . .

  17. #17
    beater
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    Remember that Onion headline

    Recently Divorced Man Trying to Get Back to Dating Weight? Well, there you have me. I'm not losing as quickly as I might like to, but what I'm doing is sustainable and tied to a lifestyle change, not a diet. I walk or bike to work a few days a week, and am generally far more active than I used to be. I generally eat much less, but when it comes to my diet, I look at it as calories I'd miss vs. calories I won't miss. I'll still go to lunch or dinner with friends when it comes up, and I certainly haven't cut alcohol out of my diet. I've really come to like the Safeway house brand Eating Right frozen meals. Like most of those meals, the sodium is up there, but it's not too much of a concern for me. They taste better than the competition, are reasonably healthy, and are 250-350 calories each. When they're on sale, I buy them for $2 each, so that's pretty much my typical lunch.

    It's much easier for me to do on my own, though. If I can't be bothered to even make a salad and want just a bowl of Cheerios for dinner, there's nobody to stop me. I'm the only one buying groceries, so I can limit what I have in the house: no cookies, for example.

    I've got another couple months of biking, now that the fire season is ending. I'm looking forward to XC ski season, because that'll be the real exercise. As much as I love biking, grinding up a hill is still work, even when it's satisfying. XC skiing is just a blast, and it's stealth exercise.
    "Back off, man. I'm a scientist." - Dr. Peter Venkman

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  18. #18
    eat your porridge jordie
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    Good advice in here guys. Heres my .02.

    I've lost a total of about 80lbs in just about 6 months, with a combination of things. At first I just started eating less of what I was eating, and walking in the morning. I noticed results immediately (within a week). Eventually I took up biking, and was eating even less. I got really serious about fitness and bought all very healthy foods. I kept very strict watch over my calorie and macronutrient intake for awhile, and continued to drop weight quickly. I was in a huge calorie deficit, and I could definitely feel it when the time came to ride. I started a type of carb-cycling routine, where I limit the intake of carbs on the days I don't work out. I'm not keeping strict watch over my calories anymore, but I'm usually trying to keep it around 2500/day. Weight training will also do wonders for weight loss. Cardio is slightly overrated. The 3 things that make the biggest difference for weight loss, in this order, are; 1)Diet 2)Strength Training 3)Cardio.

    In the end it comes down to eating healthy and exercising (who would have thought? I wish someone would have told me that sooner!) and in time it will happen. Don't try to make too drastic a change right away, chances are you won't stick with it.
    Good Luck
    "If you want to do something ordinary people can't, you have to be willing to do what ordinary people won't"

  19. #19
    2weelTom
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    Jimmy D 012, congrats. Nice job!. For once someone can say "I'm thrilled for you loss."

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mordy
    I'm definitely in the same boat. I have solved my problem by sticking to a cyclic-ketogenic-diet. Thats Atkins for athletes in layman terms. However, unlike Atkins, you have weekly or bi-weekly carb-up sessions.

    Benefits are:

    1. You can eat, a lot really, but you will find that you are not as hungry as you would think you would be. Your metabolism, while burning fat as primary energy source, tends to reduce hunger!

    2. No more energy spikes and crashes. You know the routine, you eat a bagel and drink some coffee, feel great for a while, and then you crash, making you want to eat more and get some caffeine.

    3. Weight-loss is substantial. I am aiming for 4-5 pounds a week.

    4. You won't burn off your muscle also. With correct post workout supplementation (whey + dextrose) will prevent your body from eating its own muscles. Carb-ups weekends help stimulate muscle growth by giving your body better fuels to build muscles.

    5. Carb up weekends are effing awesome! You get to chowdown on pizza, ice cream, and whatnot with abandon!
    Something along these lines is working for me now. Several years ago, I went through a major weight loss/muscle build up (I simultaneously built muscle while losing subcutaneous tissue and netted an overall loss) by accidentally doing a lower carb diet. My sweets and carbs were obtained from veggies and fruits. Weight loss was dramatic and I kept it off for five years until an illness made it difficult to maintain a healthy diet.

    I've been watching what I eat for several weeks now, but plateaued at ten pounds of loss, but I'm building lots of muscle. I decided to drop lots of the carbs again, supplement with whey protein to allow some flexibility in my diet, and I'm feeling like I did in 2000. I went on a tough ride yesterday and for the first time in many years, I didn't bonk on the ride, didn't supplement my nutrition during the ride, and didn't feel tired throughout. I'm feeling better overall again and that's addictive in itself. It was difficult sticking with a diet over the last few years because I always felt like crap. Now I'm full of energy again and doing yesterday's ride harder than I've been able to do in years was a great feeling.

    I'm sticking to no or little carbs for about two weeks, then I will phase them back in the way I was eating back in 2000 when I was at my health peak.

  21. #21
    NormalNorm
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    Good rule of thumb: Don't eat anything invented in the last 50 years.
    LOL....Thats the best advice I have heard in along time!

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero

    Good rule of thumb: Don't eat anything invented in the last 50 years.
    Ha! But yeah... the wife just lowered the boom on me (us) in that it's that time of year when we need to get better too. Cheetos... hmmmm... were those invented in the last 50 years? Crap...
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  23. #23
    Jesus loved the dinosaurs
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    Weight loss is tough. In the past 3 months, I've lost 33 lbs. (my goal is 50 lbs.) by diet and exercise.

    I've cut out beer (I miss you, beer) and really limit carbs and red meat. I eat lots of fish and veggies, and ride 3-5 times a week. I was running 5 miles every other day, but suddenly stopped losing weight. For three weeks (I had been running for 6), I didn't lose an ounce. Once I stopped running, the weightlose started again. The only thing I can think of was that the running pushed my body into starvation mode, and stopped giving up fat. The key is don't give up. If you must eat fast food, Wendy's grilled chicken sandwich is a good choice (no fries, though.) Also, soda is a tool of the devil. It has NO redeeming value at all. Hey, no one loves bad food as much as me. If I can do it, anyone can.

  24. #24
    Glad to Be Alive
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    for me it was salads.......start taking away regular meals and just have a salad.....with lots of onions (fills you up).......cantalope with cootage cheese is good....replace meals with soup......only eat half your plate....all these things were easy and I lost a total of 33 pounds
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  25. #25
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    There is an incredible amount of good advice on this thread (as most of the great threads on here)!

    I think a very important thing that was mentioned that truly relates to the OP's comments, is the fact that you have to make a lifestyle change. It's tough, and it takes a lot of work and time which is something many of us have very little of.

    One thing that I believe will certainly help anyone make this lifestyle change, is to really learn about the nutritional value of the things we put in our body, and how they effect us. You need to look at that Frappicino dietary info and see just how bad it is. Once you understand the dietary value of foods, and how detrimental some can be, you may just be scared off from eating them.

    If you can sustain a healthy diet for long enough, your entire mental games changes. After several months of keeping myself away from all of my guilty eating pleasures, I found that my taste and interest in them faded. Actually, my taste faded before interest. For example, I use to LOVE getting a Arby's cordon blu or chicken bacon swiss crispy chicken sandwich with curly fries and a soft drink. It always seemed to make me happy when I was stressed at work. After not allowing myself to eat there for 3 months or so, I gave myself the reward of getting one of those combo's after I had reached my goal weight. I found that not only did I not enjoy the meal NEARLY as much as I use to, but I was left feeling like crap and wishing I had eaten something better/healthier and more satisfying. Since, I have never gone back to Arby's. Just don't even desire to anymore. Just one of many bad habits gone bye bye.

    Most chain restaurants have the nutritional information of their items listed either in-house or on-line. Arm yourself with the knowledge of what you are putting in your body. When you know just how bad something is, and how much it will truly set you back, your mentality really starts to change and you crave those things much less.
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