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  1. #1
    Tigers love pepper...
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    Do "clydes" get more flats?

    So I've only been back into biking a few months. Had a pretty good run not getting any flats at first but lately not so much!

    Went for a quick 5 mile ride the other night, got a flat rear. I think it must have been a pinch flat cause it was on the inside of the tube (towards the rim). Maybe my pressure was low, I didn't check before the ride (rookie mistake I guess).

    I changed it to a new tube on the trail and made it back, but when I went to get the bike out last night I noticed the front was flat. Stores were closed so I decided to try a patch. Patched a hole, pumped it up.... another leak. Patched that, pumped it up, another leak! patched that... and it seemed fine. Then made rookie mistake #2... threw it back in the rim without checking the tire! 10 seconds later, another flat. Oops guess I should have pulled those goat thorns out of the tire. Duh!

    Do a lot of you run a tubless setup, or some kind of stop leak tube?

    I'm pretty new, so I guess I need to do some searching to see what products are available, but any clyde specific advice is welcomed. I don't think regular tubes are gonna cut it around here.

    6'3" 230

  2. #2
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    I'm in AZ at 6'4/320lbs and I hardly get flats. (Knock on wood). I run just regular tubes, nothing in them, at a decent pressure (usually around 45lbs).

  3. #3
    29 some of the time...
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    Thorn flats are regional and not in any way clyde related.

    Pinch flats are another story. My stats are about the same as yours. There is no direct answer. There is a huge difference in tire/tube durability and longevity from brand to brand. It will also differ between OEM parts and aftermarket.

    That said, if riding 2.0-2.1 tires I need to keep them at 45-50psi or they will pinch flat. I prefer to run 2.3-2.4 tires and keep them around 35-37psi. I do get the occasional pinch flat, but the conditions need to be just right to happen. Typically I run tubes, but if you are in a high thorn area tubeless would be the way to go.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  4. #4
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    Bigger riders = more pinch flats.
    Check your air pressure...
    Check for thorns....
    Check to make sure you have rim tape.....
    Check to make sure you dont have spokes poking through the rim.....

    "Goat Head" thorns can be a real problem out west........

    Thats just some areas that you take a look at.....I know I need to ride my 29er tires at about 38-40 psi because with my weight (260) and FS bike, pinch flats happen at low pressure.....

  5. #5
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    We have a lot of goat heads out here in NM. I run slime tubes. Seem to work very well for me. However, if you do get a pinch flat, it is a mess!

  6. #6
    thread killer
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    I've never not been a clyde. so I don't know how the other half lives.

    I run Kenda nevegal's 2.35 @ 40 psi with stan's tubeless set up.
    at 6 foot 300lb been good so far.
    next time

    [QUOTE=spazzy] Might as well sell your bikes, E-riding is much more productive.

  7. #7
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    People who run pressures too low for their riding style, conditions, and weight get more pinch flats than those who have everything realistically dialed.

    You said your just getting back into it, maybe what was fine before isn't cutting it anymore as your progressing and getting your speed back.

    I run tubeless.

  8. #8
    Clydeosaur
    Reputation: super_fly's Avatar
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    Check for thorns.

    When I got my hybrid/fitness/city bike a few years back I kept getting a flat in the rear. I was thinking "man I'm just too big for the bike". Took it to the shop and the guy ran his fingers on the inside and found a thorn. Haven't had a flat since.

    And I felt like an idiot since I worked in a shop many years ago.

  9. #9
    Tigers love pepper...
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    Yeah, the front was thorns. The back this time was a pinch I think. I did have a thorn in the rear before, but the shop fixed it when I took it in to get my new pedals on. Just got in a hurry and forgot to check the tire last night! Wanted to get a ride in.....

    For thorns (if they are broken off) do you guys carry a multi-tool or small needle nose to remove them on the trail? I have a very small toolkit I carry but nothing to pull a stubborn thorn out with.

    I think it sounds like I need to check my pressure BEFORE the ride. Not just "look" at it. That should hopefully limit pinches.

    As far as thorn options, from searching it looks like tubless, a thorn resistant tube or liners are my basic options.

    I might the TR tube first, but the ghetto tubeless system looks fairly promising (and cheap!)

  10. #10
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    FWIW, I went UST w/ sealant and haven't had a flat in 10 months

  11. #11
    govt kontrakt projkt mgr
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    I hover between 208 and 212. I was pinching a lot running the tires 30-32 PSI. Thorns were an issue too. I didn't mind changing tubes on rides except for in the extreme Texas summer heat. And my riding pals started getting tired of me having 1 or 2 flats on nearly every ride.

    So I ran Stan's for a while. Just too many issues for my taste. I'd rather have to change a tube.

    Now I'm running slime tubes front and back and about 38 PSI in the tires. It does make for a heavy tire, but last time I ran slme in a tire it lasted almost two years.

  12. #12
    Double-metric mtb man
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    Yeah, when I was running tubed, I found I had a couple spots that I would typically get pinch flats. It was a matter of too little air pressure.

    As my riding has become more variable, I decided to go tubeless...less worry about a flat if I go from trail to stairs to whatever else I find.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  13. #13
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    I think many clydes go through this.

    The trick is to get a good floor pump with a pressure guage in it and try to check pressure just before every ride in the parking lot.

    Assuming pressure is high enough to prevent squirminess, lower pressure generally gets you better traction and a little softer ride.

    One approach is to systematically run different pressures and find the lowest pressure at which you don't get pinch flats. You'll loose a few tubes this way, but gain in traction/comfort. For me that's around 38-40 psi.

    This is particularly important on a hardtail, which is what I ride, because main thing on the bike giving you bump absorption in rear is the tire...

  14. #14
    Tigers love pepper...
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    I went ahead and bought the thorn resistant tubes from the LBS at lunchtime. $10 each, hope they help. Are they less susceptible to pinches as well as thorns?

    I should probably invest in a good floor pump. Thanks. I've been trying to get by with a air compressor (or my bike pump) and the guage I use for the car tires. I think I remember people saying not to use that kind of guage.

  15. #15
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    It has been a while since I got mine, but I think I paid around $30, so not very expensive and definitely worth it.

  16. #16
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    as mentioned thorns are all about where you ride...

    I've yet to flat out on the trail... had a slow leak but a 12g co2 shot got me up to enough pressure to get the few miles out of the trail... don't recall what it was but def no pinch...

    if you are pinching it's def just to low pressure... I bring my pump with me and pump the tires before EVERY ride... that has a lot to do with the amount of time I was rolling rigid... right away I found how important the pressure was to comfort...

    specific pressure will be very personal... different tire's, wheel widths and such all play into this
    - Surly Disc trucker
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  17. #17
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    Pinch Flats

    Hallo from down under, I'm 6" 8 and ride a KHS Solo one (aluminium frame) running kenda nevigals with getto tubless at 40psi and no flats yet.

  18. #18
    Are you gonna eat that?
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    I have noticed that I only ever get flats when I forget to pack spare tubes.
    Due to a lack of interest, tomorrow has been canceled

  19. #19
    one chain, two sprockets
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    Thorns are a PITA, but pinch flats have options. Changing tires is the easiest. If you're pinching specifically the front (or the rear) tire, I would consider either stepping up the tire volume (say from 2.1" to 2.3"+), switching to a DH (pinch-protection) version, or both. Often you can get by with a standard tube in the DH tire - the multi-ply sidewall is the first line of defence. The inceased thickness of the DH tire casing will also offer increased puncture protection, but you'd have to evaluate your own riding conditions/hazards.

    I decided to go with wide rims and DH tubes/tires on my last build. There is more rotating weight to contend with, but pinch flats are not an issue. With 2.6" tires I run ~28psi front and 25psi rear. Not bad for a 230lb. dude! I've run as low as 20-23psi F&R but I really feel the increased rolling resistance in soft conditions. I run these on a SS, and although it took some training to get used to them, they give me 100% confidence.

    Tom P.

  20. #20
    Underskilled
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    6'7 240lb and pinch flats on average every hour with tubes.

    I am a sworn convert to ghetto tubeless.
    running ghetto nevegals at 20-30 PSI I get a puncture every year.
    When I get that puncture and throw in a tube I will normally puncture 2-3 times getting back to base.

    I run tubes at 40-50.

    Ghetto is a skill that needs to be learnt you will mess it up a few times, but once mastered it's easy.
    Remember how many times you blamed you shitty gears for not shifting when you first started riding, then they magically repaired when you learnt the skill to shift?

    Stick with tubeless untill you have the skill nailed and you will never go back.

    It took me 3+ hours to load my first tyre, less than ten mins for my current.

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