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  1. #1
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    Did my LBS screw me?

    I am a clyde, 6'7" and 300lbs. I just picked up a Giant 25" from my LBS, stock. This is my first real bike, and I have to say, it feels amazing and I am in love with the thing already. However, standing over it, my crotch is only about half an inch from the frame. The LBS said it didn't matter if I wasn't planning on 4 foot jumps as long as the bike feels good, which it does.

    Then I read the manual, which says if you don't have 2 inches of clearance minimum, don't even ride it around the block, and you need 4 inches for trails. So do I have to take this thing back or will I be Okay doing cross country (some trails, some paved, no jumps)? Was the LBS just trying to make a sale, or can I trust that I'll be ok?

    Thanks for any help.

  2. #2
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    I spent all last season on a bike with a negative 1.5 inch top tube clearance and was fine. Just made sure that whenever I crashed it was otb so I wouldn't get high centered. The thought of taking a good whack is scary, but it really never happens unless you happen to slip off the seat, and both pedals at the same time.

    You'll be fine. Enjoy the bike.
    I call for a mandate to allow only road bikes on trails to limit our speeds and increase our line picking skills-FB

  3. #3
    Not because I'm fast.....
    Reputation: 2farfwd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by echo3111
    I am a clyde, 6'7" and 300lbs. I just picked up a Giant 25" from my LBS, stock. This is my first real bike, and I have to say, it feels amazing and I am in love with the thing already. However, standing over it, my crotch is only about half an inch from the frame. The LBS said it didn't matter if I wasn't planning on 4 foot jumps as long as the bike feels good, which it does.

    Then I read the manual, which says if you don't have 2 inches of clearance minimum, don't even ride it around the block, and you need 4 inches for trails. So do I have to take this thing back or will I be Okay doing cross country (some trails, some paved, no jumps)? Was the LBS just trying to make a sale, or can I trust that I'll be ok?

    Thanks for any help.
    You are fine, don't sweat it. Most all of my frames fit that way and I have never wanted more standover height. People often get hung up on the standover clearance, but when you are riding, its just not that big a deal. If you are crossing a stream full of babyhead rocks and have to dismount, then yeah maybe you would want a little more room for a split second, but for 99.9% of your riding you will be fine. I am sure the manual is just ultraconservative too, I mean seriously, 4" of standover??.. please. You are good to go my friend, ride the crap out of that bike!

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the replies, I feel much better about keeping it.

  5. #5
    Your bike is incorrigible
    Reputation: Guyechka's Avatar
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    All the tips for fit in the mags and online will tell you that you need a couple of inches of standover. That's about right, sort of. I know my bikes have between 1/2 and 3 inches, and they all feel right. Standover is just one small piece in the equation. Reach is also as important, since you don't want to be too cramped or too stretched out in the cockpit.

    I'll tell you something about standover from personal experience. I bought a 21" frame and had very little standover height. The bike felt good to ride, but I was very concious of the standover. The next bike I bought was a 17" frame, and it had oodles of standover. Of course, I was also really cramped and had to extend my seatpost about a foot and a half out of the seat tube. Because I didn't like the fit of either bike, I sold each within about a year of owning them. Looking back, I could have ridden the one with little clearance much more easily than the one that was too short. I could have kept it for many years and enjoyed it. Instead, I got all caught up in "proper fit" and sacrificed even more money going in the opposite (and wrong) direction.

  6. #6
    CEO Product Failure
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    Good job!

    Top tube lenght, frame quality (material, stiffness, etc.) and maybe head tube height are the only things you need to worry about. A 25" bike is a rare find. Learn to track stand so you'll only occasionally need to dab.

  7. #7
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    Standover is just a guide line.....

    as long as the bike fits you right in all other respects it's not that important. There is WAY more to fit than just standover. So don't sweat it.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  8. #8
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    It should be fine, but...

    I have about 2+ inches of standover on my bike and would occasionally want more. Where I run in to issues are on steep technical climbs that I don't make. I stop suddenly and my feet reach for the ground below my body (which is about a foot and a half behind me on the hill) and the just touch the ground, but I can't get enough to keep myself from falling backward. Does it happen often? No, but when it does I don't like it. I will look for a little more standover in the design of my next bike.

    If you are riding light to moderate XC I don't think you will have any issues, but just think about it on your next bike.

    Ken.

  9. #9
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    Congrats on finding a stock bike that fits you. Please post more info, as many tall clydes are looking for stock bikes. Is it a Yukon?

    1/2" clearance is kind of a suprise @ 6'7". What's your inseam?

    You are not screwed. You are lucky not to have had to go custom.
    And, to have been sold a 21" with a jacked up seatpost would have been a screwing.
    undefined[SIZE=1]undefined[/SIZE]undefined

    Slow, but thoughtful

  10. #10
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    Its a stock Yukon, 26X25, gloss black. My inseam is 36. Nice to hear I got lucky, I was suspecting the worst.

  11. #11
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    Its okay, but !

    On duper steep descend it might not be confiance inspiring...(you cannot stop and put your feet on the ground)

  12. #12
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    Like they all said, dont worry, but be aware of it. My main bike only has about an inch and a half standover clearance. Absolutely no problem, except on 2 spots in the trail I ride. There are 2 steep, rooty climbs that I rarely get over (but am starting to get closer) and when I hit a root or rock just right, it stops me cold. If I put feet down, often times I come close to knocking the twins arround, not a good plan. Just remember to lean over to the side, if needed. It will only take you a couple times to get used to it, and finding a bike that fit you at 6'7'' is worth a little getting used to

    Good luck

    Matt

  13. #13
    Bike to the Bone...
    Reputation: rzozaya1969's Avatar
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    I've never had the 4" standover..... don't sweat it. Just don't jump on the top tube and you'll be fine

  14. #14
    Hmmmmm
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Those guidlines are outdated.

    I've seen those same guidelines come with bikes that they clearly don't apply to.
    I suspect they are required by the lawyers.
    What is most important, is the reach and wheelbase based on the size of your body and what kind of riding your doing. If you do technical riding like we have here at Bootleg Canyon, you'll need a slightly shorter reach with a longer wheelbase for more stability, for instance.
    If you are doing fast rolling XC, then a more streached out position with a slightly shorter wheelbase is more optimal. The only bike I've ever owned that met the guidlines was a 2000 Specialized FSR XC. They all had a low standover regardless of the frame size, Specialized just made the front triangle longer.
    I might add; if you do technical riding a taller bottom bracket height is also better, assuming you have legs long enough to touch the ground. He he.

    Later, Eric W.
    "I thought of that while riding my bike."
    Albert Einstein, on the theory of relativity.

    Peace and Long Rides...

  15. #15
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    I'm far from a Clyde, clicked on this forum by accident actually but I actually have some insight here. I'm 5'6" with a 28 inseam. I'd pretty much have to ride a BMX to get 4" standover!

    In fact, I resisted mt biking for years because I felt the bikes were just too big. Any borrowed bike was far too tall for me to put my feet down. My newest bike, a small Chameleon, has a 28.3" standover and I'm hitting jumps and drops on it and loving it.

    So my advice to you is think in triangles. With the bike slanted over you can put a foot down. That or imagine that you will always need a curb to put a foot down comfortably with the bike upright, soon you'll notice every boulder, log or whatever on the trailside to use as a "curb".

  16. #16
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    You're 6 ft 7 so maybe that large frame was the only way to get a proper upper body fit on the bike bars to seat??
    .
    .
    Life can only be understood backwards.......but must be lived forwards.

    -Kierkegaard

  17. #17
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    Yeah, you are all good. Maybe not the best fit for lift-assisted riding, but perfectly fine for most trail riding.
    -Skimming the successpool of corporate America-

  18. #18
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    As long as you're on the pedals you have more stand-over height over bumps anyways, so your OK.

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