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  1. #1
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    Did I make a mistake?

    I'm a big guy (6 foot, 290 pounds). I just ordered a Scwinn Rocket Pro on Friday (http://www.thebicycleoutlet.com/inde...hop&Itemid=32). I might be having buyers remorse, but I'm starting to wonder if this thing will hold me or if I'd be better off sending it back. Any thoughts?
    Last edited by Good Grief; 05-15-2006 at 09:44 AM.

  2. #2
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    Depends on how hard you ride. Component-wise, everything is on par with bikes at that pricepoint. I'd expect it to give you a couple years of relatively trouble-free XC service before some components start wearing out. The only one that strikes me right away is the manitou axel front fork. I have that same one on my bike and its very flexy and comes with a spring thats far too soft for a clyde. You can order a stiffer spring, but the shock will always be flexy -- if you plan on riding a lot of technical trails requiring precise wheel placement I'd look into upgrading. If you plan on riding mostly smooth, wide trails where a precise line isn't as important -- I'd run it until it wears out...

    The main thing is that much of the wear and tear on mountain bikes is rider induced -- not weight induced. I ride with a couple of guys in the 170-180 range who usually break something every ride. I usually go a few months before experiencing a failure and I ride more often (nearly daily). Example: if you come across a 4" or larger obstacle and you're at speed -- shift your weight all the way back and let the bike move under you -- using your legs and arms as additional suspension. Another example: shift ahead of time and under light load. If you shift the moment you absolutely need to be in an easier gear, you'll be far more likely to wear out the drivetrain and possibly break a chain...


    Anyway, that bike should be fine as long as you take care of it. I'm assuming you bought the bike mail-order, so I would be sure to have a good local bike shop assemble it. The bikes come in boxes mostly assembled, but the wheels may be slightly untrue, the hubs slightly tight (or loose), the cables too long, and the shifters mal-adjusted... Once assembled, you'll want to bring the bike back after ~100 miles of riding for a quick check-up/tune-up. Cables will stretch and sometimes the hubs will come out of adjustment. Staying on top of your maintaince will ensure you get years of service out of your bike, so be sure to keep the moving parts well lubed and relatively clean (just don't wash with a high-pressure hose)

  3. #3
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    Thanks!!

    I was already thinking about ordering a new fork. I was also concerned about how well the wheels will hold up.

  4. #4
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    New forks....

    If you are worried about fork prices, there's always someone swapping out something on eBay, pinkbike, ridemonkey or mtbr classieds. Just do your homework first.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Good Grief
    Thanks!!

    I was already thinking about ordering a new fork. I was also concerned about how well the wheels will hold up.
    My wife has the same wheelset on her specialized, they seem quite strong, although my wife is only 110 pounds with full armour, but I had Alex wheels very similar to thois on my Rocky flow and im 240+ and they did good even with riding Fromme mountain with them.

  6. #6
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    New fork

    Quote Originally Posted by Good Grief
    Thanks!!

    I was already thinking about ordering a new fork. I was also concerned about how well the wheels will hold up.
    That bike is nicely spec'd for that price. You will undoubtedly need to replace that fork though, IMO. The fork has very thin stanchions (28.6mm) for a guy your size. Couple this with the 120mm travel length, and they will flex a lot under your weight. Start looking now for a fork that has 120-130mm travel, dual coils and 32 mm stanchions, and swap it out ASAP. Sell the Axel and get what you can in return.

    FWIW, I'm 250 lbs and have a very nice 120 mm dual coil Marzocchi fork with 30mm stanchions, and I could feel some flex. I now have a 130mm dual coil Marzocchi fork with 32mm stanchions and it is very, very stiff.

    You've bought a nice bike, just make the one change, and I think you're good to go. let us know how you like the bike.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Call_me_Clyde
    Start looking now for a fork that has 120-130mm travel, dual coils and 32 mm stanchions, and swap it out ASAP. Sell the Axel and get what you can in return.

    Bob
    Would something like this work?

    http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/2005_Fro...t_124523.shtml

  8. #8
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    Yes it would

    Quote Originally Posted by Good Grief
    Marzocchi All Mountain and AM series forks are a great choice. Right now, you can get the '05 leftovers at really good prices on ebay and from of the online vendors, but they are becoming more scarce. Here's one from someone I've bought from and is a great source for Marzocchi forks:

    http://downshiftcycles.sslpowered.co...949fa5789f5007

    Hopefully Jared still has a few still left. If you have the cash and you're sure you want it, I'd grab it up. $250 is a steal.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  9. #9
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    The frame and most of the bits will be fine. My concerns would be the shock, wheels (more on how they were built than the bits) and fork. At 290 (trust me, used to be 300+; 250 now) most (and that air shock in particular) are at their absolute max air setting just to get you to 50% sag on that bike at your weight. Even the Fox DHR on my bike maxes out at 300psi. Things like leverage ratios and such come into play, but if it's higher than 2:1 with almost every air shock we clydes are S.O.L. Coils are our friends in a lot of cases. Anyway, I'm not an expert on that frame so I'll quit on it now.

    That fork though, for you, blows. I'm still a fan of 20mm forks for us in most cases (super stiff and won't wash out when hammered through corners). I'll always push people to Marz, but some of the Manitou offerings are nice. I have the new Z1 FR light and it's super stout for my crappy riding skills and the punishment which comes from it. My 3 or 4 year old Z3 FR (qr 20) is still kicking but (some mods later...) as well. As said before, you can always find pretty good deals on forks especially if you don't need the cutting edge stuff or the newest color (and who does, really...me I admit). Anyway, good luck and have fun riding; whatever you choose.

    Kraig...
    Are the wheels roundish? Ride it.

    Disciples Of Dirt, come ride with us.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Call_me_Clyde
    Marzocchi All Mountain and AM series forks are a great choice. Right now, you can get the '05 leftovers at really good prices on ebay and from of the online vendors, but they are becoming more scarce. Here's one from someone I've bought from and is a great source for Marzocchi forks:

    http://downshiftcycles.sslpowered.co...949fa5789f5007

    Hopefully Jared still has a few still left. If you have the cash and you're sure you want it, I'd grab it up. $250 is a steal.

    Bob
    I'm being seduced by an 05 All Mountain 1. More money than I wanted to pay, but man it looks sweet and the deals on them are hard to pass up. Would I be better off with the 110mm - 130mm travel version or the 130mm - 150mm with the bike I purchased?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Good Grief
    I'm being seduced by an 05 All Mountain 1. More money than I wanted to pay, but man it looks sweet and the deals on them are hard to pass up. Would I be better off with the 110mm - 130mm travel version or the 130mm - 150mm with the bike I purchased?
    Just bought the 110-130 All Mountain 1 on Ebay. I hope it works out.......

  12. #12
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    Good call

    Quote Originally Posted by Good Grief
    Just bought the 110-130 All Mountain 1 on Ebay. I hope it works out.......
    Use it at 110 for light singletrack, 130 for the rough stuff. I think the 130-150 would be overkill, and would riase the front end too high, thus giving you potential handling/washout issues.

    Let us know how you like the fork once you've ridden it a few times.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Call_me_Clyde
    Use it at 110 for light singletrack, 130 for the rough stuff. I think the 130-150 would be overkill, and would riase the front end too high, thus giving you potential handling/washout issues.

    Let us know how you like the fork once you've ridden it a few times.

    Bob
    Thanks. Two quick questions......

    1) Should I buy a stiffer spring, or is this an issue on Marz forks (and if so, any idea where I can find one)?

    2) Besides the potential handling issues from buying a fork with extra travel, are there any advantages to having less travel? Everybody seems to want more, and I must admit to feeling like I may be missing out on something.

    I guess there would be less flexing with a smaller amount of travel.......not that I'm going to change my mind on the fork or anything.

    Thanks again!!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Good Grief
    Thanks. Two quick questions......

    1) Should I buy a stiffer spring, or is this an issue on Marz forks (and if so, any idea where I can find one)?

    2) Besides the potential handling issues from buying a fork with extra travel, are there any advantages to having less travel? Everybody seems to want more, and I must admit to feeling like I may be missing out on something.

    I guess there would be less flexing with a smaller amount of travel.......not that I'm going to change my mind on the fork or anything.

    Thanks again!!
    shorter tr
    avel fork means less of a slack head angle and easier handling on single track, tight stuff.
    if you're only doing xc stuff you dont need more then what you have.
    my fork only has 100mm and its perfect.
    as far as the spring goes, try it first and see how it feels....if its nice and plush and doesnt bottom out easy, keep it. im not sure if your fork is air or not,if so then you dont need another spring.
    if it bottoms out really easy, then yeah get another spring, any LBS can get you one.

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