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Thread: Delicate wheels

  1. #1
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    Delicate wheels

    What's the secret to keeping your wheels (mainly rear) true. I've got an `08 Stmpjumper with the DT factory wheels and really only do cross country/ trail type riding. I'm 603/220 but so what. Had past problems on an EPIC w/ Mavic 317's. Tips, tricks,etc?

  2. #2
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    Not much you can do other than keep the tension up and on top of the maintenance. Clydes need a more robust wheel than the factory provides IMO and IME. You can get by for a while on the factory wheels, but in the end you will need something more robust. At that time you will need to rebuild on the stock hubs or buy a whole new wheelset.

    For clyde-proof wheels I like the en321 (mavic), D5.1 (DT swiss), Rhynolite (sun). Add some nice butted spokes or even straight gauge 2.0mm, brass nipples, and a durable/serviceable hub.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  3. #3
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    Hey,

    I've got the same wheels on my '08 FSR and had the same problems. Now I finally got a new wheel set (Flows/CK), hope they hold up a bit better.
    How many times have you retensioned them? I'm a bit heavier but at our weight I'm afraid we just have to deal with it when it comes to stock wheels.

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    I hope you find an answer. I had a 06 Rockhopper FSR. I never could keep the rear wheel spokes tight. I couldn't even finish a 10 mile loop on a moderately difficult trail without stopping to tighten spokes. I had more experienced riders check my spokes before the ride and when I stopped. All agreed the spokes were right before the ride and too loose to continue when I stopped.

    I finally replaced that rear wheel. Nothing exotic just a $100 wheel mavic rim with a shimano XT hub. Problem solved. I would check the spokes every couple of weeks but most were fine. I would need to adjust one or two but not much. Could easily have kept riding them the way they were.

    Oh, I should say I was closer to 250 pounds then. I'm about 230 now. I push the bike harder now so if anything I think I'm harder on wheels now than I was then.

  5. #5
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    The most important factor in wheel longevity is the quality of the build. A handbuilt wheel from an experienced builder will provide many trouble-free miles (because of the even high spoke tension, proper spoke head seating, pre-stressing the wheel, and lubing the nipples), where stock machine built wheels are a constant nightmare.

    After that, beefier rims with wider tires at higher pressures hold up better for us Clydes. Personally I run DT 5.1 rims with Kenda 2.1/2.35 Nevegals at 35-40 psi. And picking smooth lines helps too.

  6. #6
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    My buddy has had nothing but problems with his DT's on his 08 Stumpy. He made one heck of a taco yesterday on his front. He didn't really crash it, sorta just went off the trail. Nothing extreme. I was shocked to feel how light those wheels were when we took it off to try to bend it back. What are his choices?

  7. #7
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    Get yourself some hand-built wheels--I got the xt-rhynolite wheelset from jenson-usa and destroyed it in like 2 rides. I used those hubs with light mavic 717 rims to lace up my first wheelset, and they're holding up to my 240# better than any machine-made wheel I've ever ridden.

  8. #8
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    Getting handbuilt wheels is a definite plus. Wheel building is a skill. If you can find a local wheel building master, they might be able to retension the wheels better than an ameteur or moderate level shop tech.

    Riding style can also have an impact. I try to lighten-up before the rear wheel hits an obstacle.

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