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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Custom or stock HT frame?

    Hey All,

    I posted in the 29er forum but all the weight weenies didn't have an answer for me.
    I'm thinking of building up a HT two-niner that will be bomb proof. I'm basically looking for a back up bike for when my FS goes down and for a kick arse workout.
    I'll be looking to build it up with either SS or 1x9.

    What frames have you large Clydes had success with? I'm 6'6" 275lbs and have been told I should go with a steel frame. Is an alu frame out of the question?
    Do EBB hold up to Clyde mashings?

    Are there any "stock" frames available that will fit my size and pounding or do I need to go custom? Are there any build kits that I can pick up that you can recommend?

    I've had my eye on the Coconino Cycles (custom) or the Salsa Mamasita/Selma. I'm not sure if the Salsa will hold up to guys our size. I like the looks of the Selma but am hesitant b/c of the carbon rear triangle.

    Looking forward to your advice.
    Paul "Bunyan"
    Last edited by Bunyan; 08-10-2009 at 11:20 AM.

  2. #2
    29 some of the time...
    Reputation: AL29er's Avatar
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    My vote is for custom. I am 6'3" and 240lb and find even then I am pushing the limits of most of the stock framesets. Most factory hardtail 29ers are designed to be XC bikes and IMO are pretty flexy under the weight of a solid clyde. About the only exception that I see is the recently released Banshee Paradox.

    By going custom though you can specify a bike to your wants/needs. My last mtb SS was a custom rock lobster. The builder used a clyde appropriate tubeset on the bike and it was stiff yet comfortable. Any reputable builder should be able to duplicate those results though.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  3. #3
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    Second the custom route. Wanted to build up my first 29er and couldn't find an off the shelf frame with the measurements I wanted so went the custom route. Would recommend it, obviously costs more than off the shelf but worth every penny. First bike i've ever had which actually fits, didn't have to change stem length/height or anything, felt right from the first ride.

    The Ventana El Comandante 29er came the closest looks like a strong frame as well but the head tube was to short for me as I wanted more of an xc frame. I'm 6'6" and 210lbs and went with a titanium frame but if I was heavier or wanted something which would take some more abuse would go for steel.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the input guys! I am leaning towards a custom frame as well. As long as I'm going to do it I might as well do it right the first time.
    I know I saw a listing of a bunch of custom frame builders on here somewhere. I'll have to do another search. Are there any that come to mind that work particularly well with Clydes, or is it like you mentioned a good bike builder would be able to fit my body and ride style correctly.
    Is it beneficial to find a builder close to you or can some thing like that be done over the phone/e-mail?
    Another question I have for the Clydes is a slide out or EBB better suited for a Clyde if I decide to go SS?

    Thanks again for the input.

  5. #5
    rock crusher
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    I have been riding a Motobecane Outcast 29er (frame only). It is a 6061 Alu frame and have had good luck with it. But, I am only on this frame due to the low price and minimal investment (sub $200). It was a way to explore the SS world, and I really like it. I like the bike well enough to have been on 2: The first I rode x1 year, then sold it to get a disk version. The bike can be set up to be run geared as well. My next SS frame would likely be a Coconino, but I am happy with what I have until the $$ tree grows a bit. Steve is a great guy, and will go to great lengths to make your frame build everything that you want it to be. I would definitely recommend him as builder to work with!

    I am 6'9" and ~235

  6. #6
    local trails rider
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    Check if the sizing of Banshee Paradox suits you:
    Banshee Paradox
    Paradox

  7. #7
    29 some of the time...
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    I have never run paragon style sliders, but have never had any issues with EBB or horizontal dropouts on my SS bikes. About the only time you hear of issues with SS tensioners is on ill planned or poorly toleranced mass production frames. Custom builders use the good stuff and rarely have such issues.

    As far as builders I like:
    Rock Lobster
    Rick Hunter
    Curtlo
    Waltworks
    Groovey
    Cocino
    Soulcraft
    Sycip
    Wolfhound
    ...etc...
    Check out coverage of the NAHBS, tons of talented builders. If I had to choose today Curtlo would likely get my money as his pricing is about the best. If money were no object I would go for the Sycip or Wolfhound. In the middle is Rock Lobster. I like Paul and have owned a couple of his frames. They rode great, but for the most part are expensive for a no frills MTB. I got them off ebay, so no complaints.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  8. #8
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AL29er
    If I had to choose today Curtlo would likely get my money as his pricing is about the best.
    I hear he has a bit of a waiting list, though: better not be in a hurry.

    But yeah, a while ago somebody posted a pretty awsome AM hardtail by Curtlo. Clearly it was worth the wait.

  9. #9
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    Curtlo

    The Curtlo AM was FM's build that him and Doug configured. It came out pretty amazing and it seems he loves it. My Curtlo custom was placed right after his and If I get it this week or next it will be 9 months. I think FM waited 7-8 months but mine is a complete build. The cool thing about Curtlo is he does not charge extra for oversized or modifications out of the norm. He also has a ton of experience and has built bikes for all sizes. Im 6'10" 280lb and he had allot of great ides for my bike. He has also built a bike for a 7'3" 350lb actor, so he has some experience with big dudes. Just a little FYI for you. Good Luck
    Live Large

  10. #10
    29 some of the time...
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    I hear he has a bit of a waiting list, though: better not be in a hurry.

    But yeah, a while ago somebody posted a pretty awsome AM hardtail by Curtlo. Clearly it was worth the wait.
    Yes, the wait for custom is pretty long. Quickest turn I have heard of was my Ventana, he did a semi-custom x-5 in about 3 months a couple of years back. Not sure how you feel about aluminum HT, but Sherwood is a good builder and a good guy in my book.

    As we are heading towards fall I would assume an 8-9mo wait isn't a huge issue for anyone
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    Cool, thanks guys for all the great posts. I'll have to sort through some of the custom builder web sites and see if I can't find one that'll work out.

    I'm pretty sure I want to stick with Steel but I'm curious if anyone our size is riding a Ti frame? Are they too flexy?

  12. #12
    local trails rider
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    "Traditional" Ti frames are made to be light. That tends to mean flexy. There are stiff Ti frames too. The designer/builder just has to use larger diameter tubes and whatever other tweaks to get the stiffness.

    Cost tends to be double that of steel.

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