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  1. #1
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    Are cushy seatposts worth a flip?

    Are they worth the money?

  2. #2
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    Anyone out there have a thud busterthey want to give me an opinon on?

  3. #3
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    I had the long travel thudbuster. I sold it after trying to like it. It felt like I was on a springy diving board. Even after tuning it with different elastomers it still was off to me. It was also very noisy in operation. I like the idea but I think they need to re-engineer it a bit more with a coil spring instead of elastomers. Any good quality regular style suspension seatpost is better IMO.

  4. #4
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    I actually enjoyed my longtravel Thudbuster I had on my Mrazek. I'll be getting another one for the rigid 29er I'll be building up soon.

  5. #5
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    What other suspension style seatpost's are out there?

  6. #6
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    Suspension seatposts are always a bad idea. The up and down motion will make your knees sore and if you're posting in the clyde section you're going to be too heavy for any of them anyways.

    Pro tip: Lower your handlebars and shift a little weight forward. This gets weight off the saddle and adds to comfort. Too low and you'll get wrist pain but try lowering your bars a little bit.

    Fatter rear tires help a lot if you're on a hardtail. If you're on a dually then maybe look at your rear suspension settings if you're wanting additional squish.

    What tire pressure are you running? What kind of trails do you ride?

  7. #7
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    My bike shop recommended a starting pressure of 50-55psi when I bought my bike. I've been toying with pressures, and I can got to 40psi in the back with no problem, at 35 I start to "feel" things contacting the rear rim... too low.

    Anyway, getting down to 40 has made a BIG difference in comfort as the rear of my hardtail bike rolls over imperfections in the trail. I couldn't believe how much difference it made. (yeah- I'm THAT much of a noob- when they told me to run 55, I did it.)

  8. #8
    Nerdy Jock
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    Wow they recommended 55? That's so high! The highest psi I'd ever use is about 45 and that's only if I'm riding on roads... My hardtail sits at about 30-35 psi typically.
    Current bike: Rocky Mountain ETS-X 70

  9. #9
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    well, I suppose they didn't know how exactly I was going to use the bike, and in their defense, they did recommend that only as a starting point, going down until I started getting pinch flats. I felt the rim a couple times at 35 but never pinched a tube, figured it was inevitable if I didn't add some air, so now I run 40. (26" hardtail, and I'm roughly 290 ready to ride)

    Sorry for the mini-hijack, I just noticed that someone else suggested messing with the air pressure, and I can confirm that is is a worthy pursuit.

  10. #10
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    Like a 29x2.25 or bigger?

  11. #11
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    Generally speaking, the bigger the tire the cooshier the ride. All else being equal, larger volume tire should allow you to run slightly lower pressure.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    Suspension seatposts are always a bad idea. The up and down motion will make your knees sore and if you're posting in the clyde section you're going to be too heavy for any of them anyways.

    Pro tip: Lower your handlebars and shift a little weight forward. This gets weight off the saddle and adds to comfort. Too low and you'll get wrist pain but try lowering your bars a little bit.

    Fatter rear tires help a lot if you're on a hardtail. If you're on a dually then maybe look at your rear suspension settings if you're wanting additional squish.

    What tire pressure are you running? What kind of trails do you ride?
    Thanks. Lowering the bars and a bigger rear t and lower pressure all worked, Great advice!

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