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  1. #1
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    Clydesdale Killing the Weight Weenie Within

    So I'm a Mountain Biking Bodybuilder. I'm riding a Marin 29er right now. http://www.marinbikes.com/2011/bike_...nas_Ridge_29er I'm right on the verge of ordering some carbon handlebars, a new stem, saddle, and post. For the past couple weeks I've been shopping around trying to find a new light frame to build up.

    HOWEVER after reading this article about weight and its effect I find myself questioning whether or not its worth the money to save such a small amount of weight ultimately. http://newhorizonsbikes.com/articles...fied-pg170.htm

    Since I have no intention of dropping any of my 215 pounds what would be the point of getting a lighter bike? Drop all that cash on a lighter frame and some components for just a few pounds.

    Anyways I just wondered if any other bodybuilders on here ever get the itch to sink cash into light weight components even though its kind of pointless?

    I mean whats a couple pounds lighter bike when you weigh over 200 pounds? Not that a lighter bike doesn't sound cool.
    Marin 29er
    "Try not to ride too long you might end up burning muscle!"
    http://www.beeftrain.com/

  2. #2
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    I'm 6'6" tall & 275-280 and I also lift weights. I purchased a 2011 Enduro Expert. I've ridden 800-850 miles since I got this bike.

    So far, I've had to replace the wheel set (LBS did this when we found they were rated for 250lbs at delivery and my first ride I watched them flex with my naked eye moving slowly down a hill), bars, stem and now the carbon crank set (currently being researched and not yet replaced).

    Each time I've gone to aluminum & as heavy duty as I can find. It added weight for sure when you pick up the bike.

    Can't even tell when I ride it.

    Bikes aren't made for big, heavy, really strong people out of the box. Carbon flexes ALOT when you're able to put down a great deal of force & weight.

    My vote is ride it till it breaks, then replace it with something STRONGER and stiffer, not Lighter and with more flex.

  3. #3
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    Get the carbon pieces for comfort instead of weight savings.

  4. #4
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    For any big person, even at your "light" 215lbs (I am assuming you have very little fat %), you might gain a little in less exertion, but may have some components that will not last long. As already mentioned, we break stuff, especially light stuff.

    But, like riiz said, get carbon for comfort. No other reason for any big guy (bodybuilder or otherwise (like me)). Some of those carbon bars are very strong, do not flex much, and may dampen a little. And get other non-carbon parts for longevity or increased performance. A light bike is not my concern, but parts that improve comfort/performance or will last are concerns. One of the reasons I only use Thomson seatposts and stems.

    Oh, not a bodybuilder, but a big guy that lifts fairly heavy weights (for a 50something anyways, but I think I will change my lifts to start being more age-appropriate. Too long for recovery these days ).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by riiz View Post
    Get the carbon pieces for comfort instead of weight savings.
    I agree with this, my SS XC bike is set up with 31.8 Easton Carbon DH risers and I'm 220lb and really mashing most of the time up in the saddle on climbs. They have some compliance but do not flex a lot. They are very comfortable and very strong. Not as light as WW stuff but lighter than strong aluminum.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by riiz View Post
    Get the carbon pieces for comfort instead of weight savings.
    Get titanium for comfort if you're a Clyde

  7. #7
    I'm Slow
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    Don't get weight weenie carbon, they have weight limits. Downhill carbon parts are a good place to start.

    Really to save some weight get better wheels. It will decrease the rotanial mass, which is something you will feel. I got stans flow, and the deference from WTB rims was huge
    RideSAMBA.com Mountain Biking in South Alabama.

  8. #8
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    I'm 6' 4" 208. I didn't notice that I tore up or broke that much stuff. Then I got a house payment and 2 kids I notice ever thing I break now.
    Comas aren't as fun as riding your bike, so wear a Helmet.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spartan14 View Post
    Anyways I just wondered if any other bodybuilders on here ever get the itch to sink cash into light weight components even though its kind of pointless?

    I mean whats a couple pounds lighter bike when you weigh over 200 pounds? Not that a lighter bike doesn't sound cool.
    I'm just getting into bodybuilding if that counts. Currently trying to cut some more body fat before the fall.

    I'm about the same weight and have been riding for 3 yrs now. If I'm going to drop money on this sport then I try to go for bomb proof over weight savings. I can't afford to be breaking expensive carbon parts.

  10. #10
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    If you're not racing the bike, why make it lighter ? You'll get a better workout pedalling a heavy bike around. Plus you won't have to spend as much, or worry about **** breaking.

  11. #11
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    Interesting article. Thanks for posting it. Makes a good argument for dropping more weight off your frame then getting light bike parts.
    My EBB so loud
    I'm mashing...

  12. #12
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    My 2 pennies...

    As a clyde, I prefer durability over weight savings. Sometimes you can obtain both. My take on CF and clydes is that so long as the CF is a stand alone part with no other type of material bonded to it, it's okay. If there's a mechanical or chemical bond, eventually that bond will fail.

    I've ridden with CF handle bars for years without problems. That's about it as far as CF goes for me. I choose my parts because I trust them not to fail, not to save a gram or two.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by 14Stone View Post
    Interesting article. Thanks for posting it. Makes a good argument for dropping more weight off your frame then getting light bike parts.
    Yeah loosing fat off your body is a lot cheaper than buying a Carbon outfit for your bike.
    Marin 29er
    "Try not to ride too long you might end up burning muscle!"
    http://www.beeftrain.com/

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spartan14 View Post
    Yeah loosing fat off your body is a lot cheaper than buying a Carbon outfit for your bike.
    Just to play devils advocate for a second.... but I'd almost argue that its about the same when consider time spent, dietary requirements, and such to drop say 10-15 legitimate pounds.

    Of course the health benefits heavily outweigh say.. a new carbon frame, but cost wise I'm not so convinced that its cheaper all things considered.

    On the other hand, being lighter in frame helps you with ALL aspects of your life including riding. Crutching yourself on a light bike to drop 10lbs shouldn't be a focus. Having a 16lb XC bike isn't going to help you when you're running or swimming.
    My EBB so loud
    I'm mashing...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 14Stone View Post

    On the other hand, being lighter in frame helps you with ALL aspects of your life including riding. Crutching yourself on a light bike to drop 10lbs shouldn't be a focus. Having a 16lb XC bike isn't going to help you when you're running or swimming.
    Funny I got interested Xterra Triathlons because I thought my upper body strength would help with my swim times. Wrong! I've noticed that fast bikers are skinny, fast swimmers are skinny, and fast runners are skinny. I'm determined to stay as heavy as possible. It took a lot of effort to pack all the muscle onto my little frame. I started weighing 149 having gained a whole pound in USMC at Paris. I'm certainly not gonna lose weight. I do enjoy being faster than skinny people though. It doesn't happen that often so its usually a big ego boost. Then they're just skinny not skinny and faster than me. And having been consistently the fastest guy on my sports teams growing up I realize now that size commands a lot more respect and is more useful in life than my former skinny speedy build.

    So for now I'll keep training to be faster AND stronger not faster OR stronger.

    So I ordered some Crank Brothers bar and stem in Aluminum the cobalt 3 XC stuff. My stock stuff was functional but the paint was scratched off and looking ugly. My whole bike is blue and black and randomly I have this huge white 100 mm stem. It's the first thing you notice. People have asked if I broke my old stem before and if so why did I replace it with a bright white, cast iron, stem from Walmart ? As for the new Handle bar my old one was scratched up badly and I was dreading taking my grips on and off to change to my new X9 shifters. Last time I messed with the grips I didn't use any tricks I figured brute force would suffice and I ended up with blisters.

    All in all I could have skipped the new Crank Brothers cockpit and survived with my "ghetto possibly stolen" cockpit look, but my OCD kicked in and I couldn't resist all the matching stuff.
    Marin 29er
    "Try not to ride too long you might end up burning muscle!"
    http://www.beeftrain.com/

  16. #16
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    Oh I didn't mean weight in muscle mass but more in fat deposits. Dropping those is crucial to being faster. Being muscular with a low BF%... you're going to get nothing out of dropping weight for sure
    My EBB so loud
    I'm mashing...

  17. #17
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    Keep on crushin the iron....and ride heavier parts. Slight weight gain doesnt mean much when you put more stress/strain on the components leading them to fail early....

    Cheers,
    Chris

  18. #18
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    I'm 6'1 and about 250. I just got the Crank Brothers bars and love them. I didn't really think my old bars were too narrow until I got the wider ones. I have pretty broad shoulders and am so much more comfortable on the new bars. I love em... gonna order the stem soon I think.
    EAT, DRINK, AND BE MERRY... FOR TOMORROW WE DIE.

  19. #19
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    I think it's one of those all around performance things. Less weight is easier to stop, less work on the suspension, more nimble etc.

    Rotating mass makes sense even from a gyroscopic affect.

    With that said, I ride XC on a 33lb Carbon bike

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by crump582 View Post
    I'm 6'1 and about 250. I just got the Crank Brothers bars and love them. I didn't really think my old bars were too narrow until I got the wider ones. I have pretty broad shoulders and am so much more comfortable on the new bars. I love em... gonna order the stem soon I think.
    Im with you....wide bars are the best. Until you try it you won't understand.

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