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  1. #1
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    Clydesdale? Athena? More like a fat pony :|

    Hey all! This seems like the right place for this rant

    I am female, and short and stout (here is my han-dle here is my spout...). Not exactly an Athena build. I am having TONS of problems finding a bike the right size. I am 5'3", 27"-28" inseam, and big. Short arms. Every bike shop I have gone into look at me and scour for 14" bikes. I thought I was a 15". I am currently riding a 16". My current bike is a 1996 Diamondback Outlook I inherited. I hate it. I can tell it is too big, I have to shift myself to constantly get my weight back to where it should be. It feels like a beast pulling it up a hill, but that is partially me too >.<

    ANYWAYS.

    I am looking at some bikes to upgrade. I am looking for used, as I wasn't anticipating the bike to not fit (the owner was 5'1", but I guess she never rode it. It most likely never fit her anyways). I can put up with the bike for a little bit, though it is just uncomfortable and kinda discourages me from wanting to get out on it. It is definitely meant for weekend warriors or occasional riders. But, I am REALLY dedicated to pushing this and getting the weight off! I used to ride all the effin time as a kid on my mountain bike, and I LOVED it! I want to fall in love again

    My budget is around $200-$300. I can go to $300 in a few weeks or a month, but right now I only have $200 in hand. I have been agonizing over all the bikes out there, checked out bikes direct, ebay, and of course craigslist. The most important, number one thing, is fit. Once I get the right fit, I will go into details later. My plan is to get something that is older, but a solid start. A solid frame, a few good components, and the rest upgradable. The idea is to grow the bike with me over the years until I have the money and skill for a full upgrade, and maybe two different bikes once the bug has sunk it's teeth in

    Right now, I need the bike for a short commute to work (2 miles) and for training and exercise. I currently ride in the park a few blocks from me. It has lots of dirt paths of increasing difficulty, and is right next to a nice mountain range. I tried riding in the dirt, but found my shitty brakes to be a death trap. I am staying on the path until I get something that won't kill me offroad. But, I want to get into mountain biking! I want to climb the mountains I see every day My thoughts on this are to start with a base mountain bike, which is what I am most comfortable on, get better at biking, learn technical stuff and get rougher, building it up to a good bike as I get better. At that point, I will get a commuter, maybe a hybrid, for getting to work so I don't have to risk my nice mountain annihilator. I am trying to eliminate getting a 'meh' bike I am going to be trying to offload at a fraction of what I paid in a few years.

    Now, this was the original plan. But after shopping around I have a few options, and need some help deciding!

    First off, I can reverse the order and start with a hybrid commuter. One LBS is willing to sell me a brand new 2012 or 2013 13.5" Jamis Explorer for $220. I think it was an Explorer 1.0? I tried it, didn't like how much it felt like a cruiser. I feel better above the handlebars. But the LBS guys said it was adjusted to feel like that, and can be adjusted to feel like a mountain bike. It had a nice suspension in the seat, which they said is adjustable. Not sure if it can be adjusted to a fat pony like me... I am afraid I will bounce on it and bottom out with painful *CLUNK*s. It also has front suspension, not sure if it will withstand my weight or if I need to swap for a fork. The LBS guys didn't seem concerned about the shocks and my size, saying it can all be adjusted for me.

    And the other option is to go with the original idea and start with a solid mountain bike. This one from Craigslist looks the most promising. Guy said he will work with me to go down to $350, but I won't be able to afford that for a few more weeks. Most likely will be gone by then. My only major concern about it is the dent on the top tube. He says it hasn't given him any problems, but a fat pony like me may be too much if I come down on it too hard. If this is a screaming deal I can't pass up, I can over extend myself, ask the power company for an extension, and pick it up thursday when I get paid. The bike is 16", which could possibly be too big, but I was told that if fitted correctly, it *can* work. I am able to ride my 16" regardless of the fact it isn't perfect. And everything I found about Balance bikes RAVED how awesomely balanced they are, so it may feel just fine.

    The other option is to build. I have never built before. Took a wheel off for the first time today to transport the diamondback. I have been spending a couple weeks learning about bikes and components, but still feel lost as to what I need. There are SO many options and shitty walmart parts floating around, I am really afraid I am going to get myself ripped off and stuck with a broken bike and no money to fix it. Another LBS I went to, after a little nudging, I got the owner working with me. He pulled out a 14" Woman's Haro V2 frame, either 2005 or 2006 by my best guess based on info online. He said it was a 14", and it was purple and either silver or white (was really dusty, but otherwise looked brand new). We talked a bit about taking the frame he just pulled out of his project pile and making a bike around it. He said to come back next week or give him a call to see what he has come up with. I suggested cannibalizing my current bike for parts as well, he told me to go ahead and bring it by next week when I come to see him. Here are the specs of my current bike. Everything is stock except the new tires, new handlebar grips, and a better saddle. Saddle, post, and tires are obvious things that can be salvaged. What else looks good, based on everything I have mentioned? Should I spend a little money and bring him a decent used front shock instead of using a fork? There seen to be a few shocks for sale cheap on the classifieds here! Recommendations? Anything in particular I should look for, considering I am a fat pony build? Those rims any good, or am I going to warp them with my first real trail? Should I nip this build in the bud with some disc brakes? Are there any affordable ones that aren't death traps?

    Anywho, if building this thing seems like the best plan, maybe we can brainstorm what to put in this thing? Salvage what is worthwhile from the Diamondback, and there is a budget of about $160 for parts (the guy said $45 for the frame, including the dropout that he said was the only thing of real value to him). I will have more of a budget around January, maybe a couple months sooner if there is a good work season. There are some bikes I can buy on craigslist for parts, like Diamondback Crestview Bicycle or Aggressor 1.0 Mountain Bike - (says it is missing a wheel but both are in picture? And disc brakes, so maybe one being MIA makes the other useless?). ****, I could grab the diamondback for 10 bucks and the other one for the 150 and still be on budget if this seems like a good idea!

    Any and all input is greatly appreciated!
    Last edited by Bikemaya; 10-04-2012 at 03:43 AM.

  2. #2
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    A couple more bikes that may be worth stripping for parts?

    IBOC Pro Series Mongoose Mountain Bike
    Trek Bicycle (maybe if I can talk them down to like $75? The Bikepedia lists some pretty non impressive components)
    1984 Vintage Specialized Stump Jumper Bike (Palm Springs)

  3. #3
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    First, I would rule out building up a frame. Even with mostly parts you already have, that's going to be more expensive than you'd think, unless you REALLY know what you're doing, and even then there's often unexpected expenses you just can't get around.

    Used can be a good option, if you can find a bike in your size, that was owned by someone that took care of it - that you trust took care of it. That balance bike, for example... that huge dent would be a non-starter for me. It might be fine, but it might not. Craigslist also... for some reason people think their old junk is way more valuable than it really is on there. Half of what that guy with the balance is asking wouldn't be a smoking deal, considering how old and damaged that thing is.


    I'd also steer you toward newer bikes. A top-shelf bike from 1990 might not be as nice a ride as a entry level one today (depending on what you want from it, of course) and most certainly will have parts that would be hard to replace today - like a 1" fork.

    Just a quick look... The Jamis Trail XR looks to me like a solid choice. Best thing about it, IMO is the lack of a suspension fork. That lets them put some more money in the other components (it's got better drivetrain and brake parts than I see on anything else near the price), which, again my opinion, is a good thing because the fork that comes on a $300 is never going to be worth much. It comes in small sizes and female-specific.
    I'm not familiar with every bike in this range, nor what you can find at a shop, but that's the sort of thing I'd look for: a new bike, that doesn't stretch your budget, without suspension.

  4. #4
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    I'd check out the Trek 820 WSD, the 13 inch frame. It's $370 which is a little more than $300 but it's a good deal for a new bike

    Trek Bicycle

    Cannondale has some perfect bikes for you are looking for with their Quick models but you going to have to look for used since they're way over your budget.
    He who dares....wins!

  5. #5
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    The LBS has the trek 820 women's for $320. They tried to sell me one, but I wasn't totally sold on it.

    The other LBS had a 13" Jamis Explorer 1.0 stepover they would sell to me new for $220. It's a hybrid, wasn't crazy about the feel. I like the balance and positioning on a mountain bike far better than a cruiser, and the guy said it can be adjusted to feel like one.

    If I built one, to begin with, the LBS guy would do the initial build. I would basically bring him parts and he would scrounge up what he had lying around to get something going for my budget. My plan after the initial build is to keep my eye out for upgrades. A couple things on the bike that are solid and don't need upgrading for a while is ideal, especially harder things to install. But I can slowly swap out the crappy parts as I find money and parts. Obviously, I would take the bike back to him to install anything I don't feel comfortable working on. He seemed excited about the project too I didn't go into this expecting someone to build a custom bike for me, it was his idea!

    The final question I had is just advice about when to look for LBS deals. I asked all of them and got hemming and hawing from 3 out of the 4 I visited, and they told me they were just small markdowns. One shop's entire business is based around seasonal tourism, so they had the exact month I should come back for screaming deals. March. They sell the bikes they had been renting out all season that hit the set number of miles. He said some will be older high end, and some will be last year's models, and all are well maintained retired members of their fleet. And there will be tons of them. Now, if I remember correctly, he told me they offer a 3 year warranty on parts, plus manufacturer's lifetime warranty on frame. Free tune ups and adjustments for the first year. People say the best used cars tend to come from car rental companies, seems to make sense the same would be true for bikes! So, that is the 'Wait for March when I will have more money and can get a killer deal' plan. But I am concerned I might lose interest if I have more obstacles to dissuade me from wanting to ride. Or, worse, I will hurt myself trying to do something with my current bike it really shouldn't be doing.

  6. #6
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    Some more craigslist complete bikes.

    WTF is a Mongoose Quartz? I can't find any info on it! MONGOOSE QUARTZ AL 26" MTN BIKE

    And old specialized hardrock Specialized Mountain Bike Don't know what year it is, but the location is far enough away it is only worth driving there if I know I want it.

  7. #7
    turtles make me hot
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    that Mongoose is a Wal Mart bike. Stay away from it.
    I like turtles

  8. #8
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    That seems to be the status quo of every mongoose I run across. I have mostly stopped even looking at them. I had just never heard of that one and thought I might have found one of their elusive 'non-toy' bikes I keep hearing about :|

  9. #9
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    You won't find one of their non toy bikes in the US. At least not a a slightly modern one.

    From what I hear they have some real bikes they sell overseas.

  10. #10
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    I have my dad's '96 mongoose maneuver sitting in the garage. Bike is rock solid, name brand components, works as nicely as the day he bought it. Nice ride, it just is too big for me. The diamondback isn't faring as well, but it is a slightly better fit. It's a shame Mongoose went the route they did :/

  11. #11
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    Have you looked on ebay?
    What I do is put the bike company in front of the letters "mtb" and that pulls up all the info for the particular bike company.
    (Example: GT mtb, Jamis mtb, Trek mtb, etc.)
    Make sure you are looking in the sporting goods department.

    ...Also...post up some threads in the Women's Lounge forum here at mtbr.com if you haven't already done that.
    Unless you want to start off wth a rigid fork, your suspension fork should not be anything lower than a Rock Shox Recon I would say. You will have to get a spring kit for your fork that is designed for your weight unless you use air fork.
    ...most importantly, try to be patient and try to save up some more money so you can get a good bike first time around. No sense wasting money buying something you will end up not using later on. We all go through this.
    ...try to be patient and stay on mtbr.com. you can't go wrong.Too many people here for you to suffer a mistake. You are in the right place. People from all over the world post up on mtbr. How can you lose? When folks agree on something in numbers you're probably on the right track.
    ...keep posting up at different times of the day and in many forums...and keep a notebook.
    zarr
    watch out for my replies too.
    ...offhand i would say look on performancebike.com and nashbar.com for some bike deals...but don't buy til you let some forum members know what you found so you won't make ANY mistakes.
    roccowt.
    rocnbikemeld

  12. #12
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    My first mistake was blowing all my money on Nashbar and Amazon on accessories! I was chomping at the bit (and got some KILLER deals) waiting five effin days for the shop to finish the tuneup. Only after I got that bike home, and began riding it, did I realize my mistake...

    I also won't go to that LBS again.

    [LBS_RANT]

    They did a shitty job on the tuneup on one bike, and the other was used so little and stored so well I know it just needed some grease and a good wipe down to work like new (the guy chuckled when I brought the dust caked bike in and asked how it was stored to keep it in such good shape. It was stored in a regular outdoor garage where there is high elevation, mild to chilly temps, very dry air... a nice retirement location for a bike I guess :P) Nothing was wrong with either bike, each cost $40 of pure labor for a tuneup I doubt they spent more than 15 minutes on (maybe 20 to clean the dust off of the nicer one ). If they did, they would have seen the shitty brake pads needed replacement (DUH) and they would have ridden the ****ing thing to realize the derailleurs needed adjusting so I could get more than 4 gears on my 18 gear bike :|. Yes, I took it back and made them fix it. He wanted to hold on to it for the weekend. I told him it was my only bike and I really didn't want to be without it. Five minutes later, after a TEST RIDE this time, he had it adjusted. And he tried to sell me $10/ pair brake pads instead of just throwing on some generic ones from the parts bin, which would seem to be the right thing to do considering they missed it the first time... and that's something basic I expected to be included in a tune up anyways...

    [/LBS_RANT]

    There is another shop only a couple miles further away than the shitty nearby one. They were super chill and did their best to work with me to get me a bike, even suggesting when I should come back for their killer deals. I will go to them next time my bike needs work. But, I also would rather learn to do my own tuneups, chain greasing, simple maintenance, etc. instead of paying someone for it.

    *sigh*

    In retrospect, I should have tried out the bike before anything else and realized I was already beyond it. The good news is, I have a decent helmet, a couple basic lights, a repair kit, and clothes that will wick sweat and heat off me (I live in the desert. This is the first time I have purchased sport specific athletic wear, because I know I can seriously hurt myself if I don't keep the heat off). I hopefully won't hurt myself *too* badly despite my bike's best efforts

    And I will keep posting my craigslist finds! If something looks good, or even has salvageable parts that can extend the life of my current ride, I would like to know! I am going to check out one tomorrow that has been wasting away in the guy's yard. It sounds like he just wants someone to haul it away. It might have some stuff I can pull, namely the Shimano Acera Derailleurs that would be a huge upgrade from my tourney ones if they can be saved. What do you guys think? What should I look for to check if parts can be salvaged from the elements? Diamondback Crestview Bicycle

    This one is also VERY tempting to strip to have the LBS guy pop onto the 14" frame. It would be my whole budget, so this bike would need to have all the major stuff (I can pull my seatpost, saddle, handebar covers from old bike). Should I check it out? What little things should I look for that might be missing/ broken that will get me? IBOC Pro Series Mongoose Mountain Bike

    The other bikes I am keeping an eye on, with the idea of stripping for parts, are these:
    Specialized Mountain Bike (actually looks like it *may* be a small frame too! Waiting to hear back...)
    1984 Vintage Specialized Stump Jumper Bike (Palm Springs) (I would feel bad stripping this beauty... I hope it gets a good home with someone who will ride it well!)
    Aggressor 1.0 Mountain Bike - (based on the boats in the background of one picture, it wasn't taken locally. The area code is not local either. I am afraid I might get mugged. I will bring my mace )
    Trek Bicycle (lowest end components out of everything I am looking at, but also looks complete.)
    trek 1420 mens bike (not sure if the conversion will be doable using parts from my mountain bike to bridge the gap?)

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    My first mistake was blowing all my money on Nashbar and Amazon on accessories! I was chomping at the bit (and got some KILLER deals) waiting five effin days for the shop to finish the tuneup. Only after I got that bike home, and began riding it, did I realize my mistake...

    I also won't go to that LBS again.

    [LBS_RANT]

    They did a shitty job on the tuneup on one bike, and the other was used so little and stored so well I know it just needed some grease and a good wipe down to work like new (the guy chuckled when I brought the dust caked bike in and asked how it was stored to keep it in such good shape. It was stored in a regular outdoor garage where there is high elevation, mild to chilly temps, very dry air... a nice retirement location for a bike I guess :P) Nothing was wrong with either bike, each cost $40 of pure labor for a tuneup I doubt they spent more than 15 minutes on (maybe 20 to clean the dust off of the nicer one ). If they did, they would have seen the shitty brake pads needed replacement (DUH) and they would have ridden the ****ing thing to realize the derailleurs needed adjusting so I could get more than 4 gears on my 18 gear bike :|. Yes, I took it back and made them fix it. He wanted to hold on to it for the weekend. I told him it was my only bike and I really didn't want to be without it. Five minutes later, after a TEST RIDE this time, he had it adjusted. And he tried to sell me $10/ pair brake pads instead of just throwing on some generic ones from the parts bin, which would seem to be the right thing to do considering they missed it the first time... and that's something basic I expected to be included in a tune up anyways...

    [/LBS_RANT]

    There is another shop only a couple miles further away than the shitty nearby one. They were super chill and did their best to work with me to get me a bike, even suggesting when I should come back for their killer deals. I will go to them next time my bike needs work. But, I also would rather learn to do my own tuneups, chain greasing, simple maintenance, etc. instead of paying someone for it.

    *sigh*

    In retrospect, I should have tried out the bike before anything else and realized I was already beyond it. The good news is, I have a decent helmet, a couple basic lights, a repair kit, and clothes that will wick sweat and heat off me (I live in the desert. This is the first time I have purchased sport specific athletic wear, because I know I can seriously hurt myself if I don't keep the heat off). I hopefully won't hurt myself *too* badly despite my bike's best efforts

    And I will keep posting my craigslist finds! If something looks good, or even has salvageable parts that can extend the life of my current ride, I would like to know! I am going to check out one tomorrow that has been wasting away in the guy's yard. It sounds like he just wants someone to haul it away. It might have some stuff I can pull, namely the Shimano Acera Derailleurs that would be a huge upgrade from my tourney ones if they can be saved. What do you guys think? What should I look for to check if parts can be salvaged from the elements? Diamondback Crestview Bicycle

    This one is also VERY tempting to strip to have the LBS guy pop onto the 14" frame. It would be my whole budget, so this bike would need to have all the major stuff (I can pull my seatpost, saddle, handebar covers from old bike). Should I check it out? What little things should I look for that might be missing/ broken that will get me? IBOC Pro Series Mongoose Mountain Bike

    The other bikes I am keeping an eye on, with the idea of stripping for parts, are these:
    Specialized Mountain Bike (actually looks like it *may* be a small frame too! Waiting to hear back...)
    1984 Vintage Specialized Stump Jumper Bike (Palm Springs) (I would feel bad stripping this beauty... I hope it gets a good home with someone who will ride it well!)
    Aggressor 1.0 Mountain Bike - (based on the boats in the background of one picture, it wasn't taken locally. The area code is not local either. I am afraid I might get mugged. I will bring my mace )
    Trek Bicycle (lowest end components out of everything I am looking at, but also looks complete.)
    trek 1420 mens bike (not sure if the conversion will be doable using parts from my mountain bike to bridge the gap?)
    mmmm.
    I never bought anything from Craigslist...and I don't go anywhere near any bikeshops unless it's a last resort. I began to really like bikes, and I build from scratch.
    ...I suppose I owe the local "bike shops" a debt of gratitude for treating me like crap. If they didn't, I might have never learned as much as I have...so my hat goes off to them.
    ...But I owe a bigger debt of gratitude to MTBR for maintaining this great website and also to those who helped me along the way.
    ...As I said before...be PATIENT and stay on this website, make some friends, and you will learn everything you need to know.
    ...it's all right here.
    ---zarr
    ...and welcome to the tribe.
    roccowt.
    rocnbikemeld

  14. #14
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    Well, I do need materials to play with and learn how to build At the very least, the one the guy is throwing away would be worth picking up to tinker with!

    Where do you get your parts from? New? Used off ebay?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    Well, I do need materials to play with and learn how to build At the very least, the one the guy is throwing away would be worth picking up to tinker with!

    Where do you get your parts from? New? Used off ebay?
    Well...big list.
    pricepoint.com, ebay, jensonusa.com, performancebike.com,, artscyclery.com, crosslakesales.com, niagaracycelworks, blueskycycling.com,...on and on.
    ...when I do ebay, often I just put in the color and mtb behind it.(blue mtb, red mtb, etc.)
    ...or sometimes just put mtb in the search under sporting goods where it says categories.
    then i view sellers other items after i bring something up. you can go on the "Where are the best deals?" forum here at mtbr.
    ...And the guys will tell you where to get stuff here too.
    Read the reviews too. There's tons of stuff out there.
    roccowt.
    rocnbikemeld

  16. #16
    turtles make me hot
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    I have my dad's '96 mongoose maneuver sitting in the garage. Bike is rock solid, name brand components, works as nicely as the day he bought it. Nice ride, it just is too big for me. The diamondback isn't faring as well, but it is a slightly better fit. It's a shame Mongoose went the route they did :/
    My brother had a Mongoose Rockadile back in the 90's. One of my friends bought it from him and still has it. They used to be great bikes.
    I like turtles

  17. #17
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    Bah. Guy already sold the junker

  18. #18
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    Whoa.

    My brain is mush from everything I have been sifting through today. I narrowed down the two components I want to be decent on my first build. A solid and relatively inexpensive crankset and some decent v-brakes that won't get me killed. As much as I WANT nice derailleurs, I don't need them. There seem to be a lot of them floating around, so upgrading shouldn't be a problem. I need a bit of help in terms of what to look for in these two. Being short with short legs, I want a shorter crank, correct? And other than reviews or just trying them, I am not sure how to sniff out good brakes.

    For everything else, I was trying to sift through all the sales from Clearance Offers - Massive Savings

    I could build a bike from the clearance. It is pretty insane. Anywho, the things I picked out and was looking at:

    Wheels. Clearance Offers - Massive Savings I can't tell what size the Mach 1 are?
    A nice short stem FSA HS-06-TH Stem | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com and cheap, but quality handlebar RaceFace Evolve XC Flat Bars 2012 | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com

    and headset Syncros Cromoly Threadless Headset | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com

    Depending on what speed I decide to go with, SRAM PG820 8 Speed MTB Cassette | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com for 24 speed setup,

    crazy cheap suspension fork Post Moderne Cozy-St Fork | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com

    Shifter SRAM X9 8 Speed Twister Shifter | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com which I am a bit unclear about the specs. Is it only eight gears (it says front and back) or is it the eight plus the three on the crank, for 24? Is it just the shifter for the rear, and I need one for the crank?)

    Front derailleur. Shimano LX M567 Top Swing 8sp Front Mech | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com
    SRAM X9 2x10sp Low Direct Front Mech | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com is a much nicer model, but I am getting lost again as to what I need. I read a thread about the long vs short front derailluers, and it seems silly to me to lock out any gears, so I should go for long. How do I know if they are long ones? and the 42-32-22 is standard for cranksets, so I imagine I want the 42T model? But which 'spec'? GAH.

    It probably would be way less of a headache to keep checking craigslist for a complete bike... but at least I am learning about this **** by googling all these parts!

  19. #19
    turtles make me hot
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    umm... Unless I'm reading it wrong, I think those Mach 1 wheels are only 20". Also, that fork is for a 700c wheel. This stuff is all wrong.
    Sette Reken Alloy Hardtail Frame at Price Point

    Check out this frame in small or 14". Give me some time and I'll look up some deals on wheels and a fork.
    Too bad you live on the other coast. I've been building bikes for women and kids lately and have come up with a good, solid, simple build that works well.
    The latest is a 13" framed 29er hardtail for my sister in law's girlfriend. She needed low standover height.
    The link to the frame I'm showing you requires 26" wheels and fork. All should be easy enough to find.
    I like turtles

  20. #20
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    BlueSkyCycling.com - Shimano Deore Disc Wheelset W/Sun Rhyno Lite Rims

    My 8 year old is currently riding Rhyno-Lite rims in 24" with Deore hubs. Bombproof wheelset. I laced them myself and spent more than what these cost.

    RST GILA T9 100mm Suspension Mtb 26" Bike Fork Disc / V Brake White NEW | eBay

    I would hate to see you buy some crappy fork. Maybe start on a rigid fork and upgrade later?
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  21. #21
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    The owner of one of the LBS has a 14" Haro V2 frame for me, and said he would work with me to get a complete build around it. I know if I leave it all up to him, I am relying on whatever he has lying around, so I told him I would try to find some parts for him. I still have a complete bike, so I figure whatever I don't buy can be scrounged off that, so all I am paying the guy is $45 for the frame and whatever he says his time putting it together is worth.

    Was the fork I linked no good? I couldn't find any info on it, but considering what the site *claimed* it normally retails for, I thought there might be a good chance it is decent! Is the one you linked any good, or should I just wait to upgrade to something better later? A good crankset and good v brakes are my priority to get for the build, the rest I just hope to get lucky and find some good deals on low and mid grade name brand stuff.

    Now, how do I shop for rigid forks? Can that be pulled from my current bike too? Hmmm...come to think of it, the Haro frame is aluminum, and my current bike is steel. No dice. I am kind of curious to see what the LBS guy throws on it...

  22. #22
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    Found that fork you linked at another site with free shipping.

    RST GILA T9 100mm Suspension Mountain Bike Fork Disc / V Brake White NEW: 348912 Random Bike Parts

    Can't beat $15 for Deore brakes! Random Bike Parts > Brakes,Brakesets,Calipers,Linear Pull,V-Brake,Disc,Hydraulic,Front,Rear,Canti

    They have some cheap ass wheels too! Random Bike Parts > Bike,Bicycles,Wheel,Wheelset,Mtn,26",Mountain,Free ride,DH,Race,Single Track

    All their **** is cheap. I will definitely hold onto that site for checking prices.

  23. #23
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    45 for that frame seems like a fine deal. 15 for brakes is great too.
    The wheels I linked up are very strong and stiff, PLUS it's Shimano hubs that you can use if you upgrade to discs and the rims are V brake ready. And they come with the skewers. It's a win win...
    You can use a steel fork on an aluminum frame as long as the headtube and steerer are compatible. If you can pirate the fork off your current bike and save up for a good air fork down the road, go for it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    that Mongoose is a Wal Mart bike. Stay away from it.
    How depressing, Mongoose used to be independent and make a really nice bike.

    Anyhow, I would stick to Craigslist or ebay and look for local listings so you can check for fit live in person.

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    Alright, will stick that wheelset on my xmas list for sure! To get me until then, I had already planned on taking them off my current build.

    What about the other stuff? Solid finds? Should I pull the trigger on the handbar/ stem/ and headset, cassette, shifter, and one of the front derailleurs?

    And does anyone know anything about that "Post Moderne Cozy' suspension fork? My best guess as to the year of the frame is '05 or '06, both which came stock with an 'RST Capa T5', 75mm. What I read is that you want to try to match the specs of stock as much as you can so maintain the intended geometry. There isn't much info on the bikepedia about the fork, so I am not sure what size I need? Obviously, a 26", everyone says air is king, and as generous travel as I can afford for a fat pony. Beyond that, I don't know how to choose one that is the right size!

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    *shakes head*

    Could they make wheel matching MORE CONFUSING?! Seriously...

    So, I know I have the correct headset (1 1/8") but I am having trouble getting a straight answer as to whether a 700c fork will work with a 26" wheelset and MTB setup. The description for the fork says:


    Travel: 80mm.
    Wheel size: 700c.
    Steerer: 1 1/8” threaded - 155mm length.
    V-brake mounts only.
    Mudguard eyelets.

    Steerer is the right size for the frame, I am planning on starting with v-brakes, so I can always upgrade it later when I get disc brakes and throw the fork on another bike as an upgrade. The travel is only 5mm more than stock, so I am hoping that means the geometry will be maintained.

  27. #27
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    Most of your stuff looks fine. That Post Modern fork says it's for 700c wheels. Without a pic it's either for 29er wheels or road wheels. NOT what you're looking for.

    A fork designed for 700c wheels will raise the front of your bike too much and the brakes won't touch your rims.
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    Hope it is still available, going to go try to pick up this 2005 Trek 820 from craigslist and strip it for parts:

    TREK 18" MOUNTAIN BIKE with Locks

  29. #29
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    I got the Trek for $50

    Here is the Bikepedia list of parts: BikePedia - 2005 Trek 820 Complete Bicycle

    Not sure what to strip and use on a new build, or if I should keep it as a whole and try to trade? It is in great shape, ready to ride. The tires are the only thing that will need replacing anytime soon, the bike was well ridden but also very well taken care of and stored indoors.

    I went for a quick spin around the block on it, couldn't help myself. I was surprised how comfortable I was on it despite it being so HUGE and feeling like I was a passenger on the bike instead of it being an extension of me... you know what I mean? The biggest thing about it was how flippin PLUSH the ride felt! I have only ridden steel non suspension my whole life. I am used to jarring the nose into my crotch when I hit a bump going uphill, and getting some major tennis elbow after an intense ride. I am sure a lot of it is bad form. I am almost afraid I will never learn GOOD form if I put the suspension fork on my new bike! Maybe I should stick with a rigid for my own bike skills sake? But oh gawd that was a nice ride... I need to take it on a longer one on my next day off before I can give a definite opinion on it. Not sure how much wheelsets play in this either? Do they affect the smoothness of a ride?

    What I was unimpressed with, right off the bat, was the shifters/ derailleurs. Not sure which was giving me problems, but it was no better or more reliable than the tourney on the diamondback. The Altus on the Mongoose didnt give me any problems... until the bike tipped over. Not crashed, TIPPED. Then I began to have trouble. I do prefer the grip shifters still, however. Hand position always seems to stick my hand in the way of triggers, and I accidentally jar them. Also, the shifting just feels the smoothest on the grip shift, even smoother than the trigger that is 10 years newer!

    Need some more time feeling the brakes, but they are eons better than the diamondback, which are horrendous. I think it just needs brake pads, I ordered some, lets see what happens when they come in! Need to look closely at it and see if I can adjust the tension/ pressure on the handles too, I need three fingers to even feather it, four if I want to stop (and it is a skidding stop...). That is why I haven't taken the diamondback off trail yet, despite my itching to do so I asked the LBS guy about it when I took it in for him to adjust the improperly tuned derailleurs, and he shrugged his shoulders at me, said it looked adjusted correctly, and squeezed the handle on each bar to prove it actually moved. I asked about the brake pads, at which point he scratched his head and said that might be it (without even looking at the pads) then tries to sell me pads and tells me they are hard to put on. I raised an evebrow as I asked if all I needed was a hex tool, and he went on about having to take the entire closure apart, at which point I pointed at the release on the wire and the hex screw. One look at the ****ing brake and I could figure out how to change the pad. Sheesh, I know I am a chick and supposed to be an idiot at these things, but seriously?! *winces* More LBS rant, sorry Ya, my bikes won't be going there anymore. Anywho, more research and I found that some brake handles have a tensioning screw to adjust it, so I will poke around them before I go out again and see if it has one.

    Oh, the only thing I pulled the trigger on so far was a set of brakes, Shimano Deore v-brakes. 15 bucks a set, so 30 bucks and I am good to go. Being able to stop is worth getting something new and decent quality The other parts I am still hemming and hawing over, trying to decide how many speeds I want to go with, which dictates cartridge, rear derailleur, and shifters. I am leaving it up to my bargain hunting at this point. Whatever the max speed is on the shifters or derailleur I end up getting is what I will go for!

    Still having trouble finding that screaming deal on a crankset. I am concerned with my weight I will mutilate any cheap ones. All my poking and I still don't know where to draw the line between cheap and bare minimum what I should be using.

  30. #30
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    After much discussion with the LBS guy, I pulled the trigger to get the build started. We are going to piece meal it together with closeout mid range parts, try to build a thousand dollar bike for around 500

    Here is where I am starting:



    The Haro V2 frame, 14" (includes an upgraded dropout since he had used the stock one already). A new Shimano Deore XT wheelset. Got both for a grand total of $120 plus the Trek 820, so out of pocket is $170. I think I am doing pretty damn good so far

    He told me to email him all the parts I find. He will let me know if he can get me a better deal, if I am getting ripped off, if the part is crap, or if I should go for it. I'll send him the list I posted here and see what he thinks.

    I am stoked, hope to have this build done around February. In March, I will go by the rental place for a nice commuter or anything that I can swap out better parts from. This is the revised plan

    So stoked! Can't wait to get this thing together
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Clydesdale? Athena? More like a fat pony :|-img_20121003_231826.jpg  


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    Wow... Good work.
    Also, you seem to have found a bike shop guy that truly cares. This seems to be working out for you.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    I got the Trek for $50

    Here is the Bikepedia list of parts: BikePedia - 2005 Trek 820 Complete Bicycle

    Not sure what to strip and use on a new build, or if I should keep it as a whole and try to trade? It is in great shape, ready to ride. The tires are the only thing that will need replacing anytime soon, the bike was well ridden but also very well taken care of and stored indoors.

    I went for a quick spin around the block on it, couldn't help myself. I was surprised how comfortable I was on it despite it being so HUGE and feeling like I was a passenger on the bike instead of it being an extension of me... you know what I mean? The biggest thing about it was how flippin PLUSH the ride felt! I have only ridden steel non suspension my whole life. I am used to jarring the nose into my crotch when I hit a bump going uphill, and getting some major tennis elbow after an intense ride. I am sure a lot of it is bad form. I am almost afraid I will never learn GOOD form if I put the suspension fork on my new bike! Maybe I should stick with a rigid for my own bike skills sake? But oh gawd that was a nice ride... I need to take it on a longer one on my next day off before I can give a definite opinion on it. Not sure how much wheelsets play in this either? Do they affect the smoothness of a ride?

    What I was unimpressed with, right off the bat, was the shifters/ derailleurs. Not sure which was giving me problems, but it was no better or more reliable than the tourney on the diamondback. The Altus on the Mongoose didnt give me any problems... until the bike tipped over. Not crashed, TIPPED. Then I began to have trouble. I do prefer the grip shifters still, however. Hand position always seems to stick my hand in the way of triggers, and I accidentally jar them. Also, the shifting just feels the smoothest on the grip shift, even smoother than the trigger that is 10 years newer!

    Need some more time feeling the brakes, but they are eons better than the diamondback, which are horrendous. I think it just needs brake pads, I ordered some, lets see what happens when they come in! Need to look closely at it and see if I can adjust the tension/ pressure on the handles too, I need three fingers to even feather it, four if I want to stop (and it is a skidding stop...). That is why I haven't taken the diamondback off trail yet, despite my itching to do so I asked the LBS guy about it when I took it in for him to adjust the improperly tuned derailleurs, and he shrugged his shoulders at me, said it looked adjusted correctly, and squeezed the handle on each bar to prove it actually moved. I asked about the brake pads, at which point he scratched his head and said that might be it (without even looking at the pads) then tries to sell me pads and tells me they are hard to put on. I raised an evebrow as I asked if all I needed was a hex tool, and he went on about having to take the entire closure apart, at which point I pointed at the release on the wire and the hex screw. One look at the ****ing brake and I could figure out how to change the pad. Sheesh, I know I am a chick and supposed to be an idiot at these things, but seriously?! *winces* More LBS rant, sorry Ya, my bikes won't be going there anymore. Anywho, more research and I found that some brake handles have a tensioning screw to adjust it, so I will poke around them before I go out again and see if it has one.

    Oh, the only thing I pulled the trigger on so far was a set of brakes, Shimano Deore v-brakes. 15 bucks a set, so 30 bucks and I am good to go. Being able to stop is worth getting something new and decent quality The other parts I am still hemming and hawing over, trying to decide how many speeds I want to go with, which dictates cartridge, rear derailleur, and shifters. I am leaving it up to my bargain hunting at this point. Whatever the max speed is on the shifters or derailleur I end up getting is what I will go for!

    Still having trouble finding that screaming deal on a crankset. I am concerned with my weight I will mutilate any cheap ones. All my poking and I still don't know where to draw the line between cheap and bare minimum what I should be using.
    ...Just my 2 cents, but you can get some disc brakes for about the same price as v-brakes.
    Gatorbrake Mechanical Disc Brake at Price Point
    replacement pads for those:
    Alligator Hayes MX-2/Gatorbrake Disc Brake Pads at Price Point

    ...but why waste time with spending 20 bucks on a halfway product, when you could get the BEST mechanical disc brake in the world for about $17 more?
    ...they are the bb7s. This is a VERY VERY good price for them too... act quickly.
    ...well, they were $37, but the sale's over.but anyway here they are.
    Avid BB7 Mech Disc Brake Grey Fnt/Rer 2011 at Price Point

    And here's some other cheaper discs:
    BlueSkyCycling.com - Funn EZR Mechanical Disc Brake w/ Rotor
    I think these use the Hayes mx2 replacement pads too. and the come in 180 or 160 rotors...you might want a 180 rotor up front, but you might need an adapter depending on the fork you choose...prolly will.som Avid
    ...and get some Avid Fr-5 or speed dial brake levers.
    BlueSkyCycling.com - Avid FR5 Brake Levers
    or...
    BlueSkyCycling.com - Avid Speed Dial 7 Brake Levers 2011
    ...ebay has this stuff too 24/7.
    Look for sales.
    Crankwise...unless you need a shorter length crankarm, this is a pretty nice cheap priced set with the bottom bracket included.
    BlueSkyCycling.com - Race Face Ride XC X Type Crankset w/ Bottom Bracket
    ...just my .02.

    Avid BB5 disc brakes (around $30) are pretty good too...but remember nothing is as good as BB7s mechanical disc brake speaking. Check for 32mm Rock Shox forks. BlueSky has some. The Recon is good.You will prolly like the recon solo air.
    ...check on ebay.The Manitou Match Comp fork is good too.(ebay and performancebike.com among others have them). Be careful handling discbrake rotors.Very sharp!
    roccowt.
    rocnbikemeld

  33. #33
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    I realized I never said thanks for all the previous help

    Thanks!

    Ok! Just popped in to see if anyone has thoughts on a couple vintage forks I found. Are they all worth around $100, and would they work for a clyde? Oh, also not sure if I mentioned it, but I need 100mm or less travel. My frame was made for a 60mm fork, and the LBS guy who specializes in Haro said I can stick something up to 100mm on it and not mess up the frame geometry.

    Marzocchi Bomber z3 (from the UK, I expect shipping to be MASSIVE.)
    Marzocchi Bomber Z3 Light Suspension Forks 1 inch steerer Retro Excellent Cond. | eBay

    Marzocchi Bomber Superfly Z2
    RARE Marzocchi Bomber Z 2 Fork Super Fly Made in Italy | eBay

    Marzocchi Z3 QR20
    Marzocchi Z3 QR20 100mm Fork | eBay

    As you can see, I went on a Marzocchi spree after finding stellar reviews on older forks. All of these have good reviews that date to before 2005, but I am not sure if they still stand up to modern forks in ~$200 price range, and there was nothing about large riders.

    In terms of modern forks, I have narrowed it to two.

    One is what Zarr recommended, the Mantiou Match Comp:
    Manitou Match Comp Rim/Disc QR Fork 2012 at Price Point

    And the other came from another Clyde thread (and due to price, if all is equal, is what I would go for) Rock Shox Recon Silver:
    BlueSkyCycling.com - 2011 Rock Shox Recon Silver R Coil Fork OE (but the red clashes with my frame!! /girly moment)

    Thanks guys!

  34. #34
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    Hmmm... LBS guy said coil shocks are a pain in the ass to maintain. He said I should stick to air if possible. What do you guys think? Anything worthwhile in my price range and considering my size, or should I stick with coil?

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    What's your price range for a fork again? Sorry... I didn't go back and read the entire thread.

    Air is superior, but my stepson is riding a Rockshox Tora coil fork and it's fine so far. I would imagine the cheaper coil forks that don't have the parts availability like Rockshox may be difficult, but no problems with ours.
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    What's your price range for a fork again? Sorry... I didn't go back and read the entire thread.

    Air is superior, but my stepson is riding a Rockshox Tora coil fork and it's fine so far. I would imagine the cheaper coil forks that don't have the parts availability like Rockshox may be difficult, but no problems with ours.
    $200-$300, i have no problem with nos items or light/ responsible used. But if there is little diffence between them in that range, I would rather go cheap, spend the extra on something else, and upgrade later.

  37. #37
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    I like turtles

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    Hmmm... LBS guy said coil shocks are a pain in the ass to maintain. He said I should stick to air if possible. What do you guys think? Anything worthwhile in my price range and considering my size, or should I stick with coil?
    that is a nonsense statement. If a LBS guy told me that [and wasn't kidding], I'd probably slap him.
    Coils require less maintenance than air - there are no pressure seals.

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    Was at work and missed it before it was picked up :/

    I looked for more, and found one on bid. Not expecting much luck, but I will give it a shot.

    However, a bit of poking for other models in the same line found a 2008 Manitou Minute RTC on bid. Looks like a better fork from what I read! And I have no problem with NOS, so I may get a good deal on this


    Now, as for the LBS guy and what he said about coil shocks. The long version is he told me they are expensive and a pain to tune in, since you have to take it apart to do so each time you need to adjust. If it needs maintenance, it has to be taken apart and is expensive and time consuming. He did also say they need maintenance less often than air shocks. He went on to say that air shocks are a breeze to dial in since you just pump them, and maintenance, though yearly, is cheap with fast turnaround. He made it quite clear he is a firm believer, and a huge fan, of ~$700 range Fox air forks and thought they are worth the investment. I pretty much stonewalled him and told him I don't need that kind of travel and performance as a beginner. I was curious what bikes they had in the slightly below $1000 range, and he pretty much no-sold me on everything, pointing out what I was missing out on by not going up in each price range. He used a Specialized Stumpy FSR 29er basically as an example of a 'real' mountain bike without all sorts of big flaws. I think he is one of those who thinks any mountain bike below $2000 is just a toy, because that is how he was shrugging some of them off. That kind of stuff makes me feel silly and embarrassed for being poor and interested in an expensive hobby, you know? :/

    When it came to road bikes, he was actually less biased. He basically said if I just need something for a nice ride (commute and cardio workouts), get something with an aluminum frame to save money, but spring for the carbon fork so the ride is smoother. He said the $1200 range would probably keep me quite happy. That was the bit of useful info I got from him, and will help me out when looking at some used ones next year

    I think he was a bit of a fork snob. At least he didn't laugh at me when I said I ride a steel full rigid! He looked impressed, actually.

    Needless to say, the visit reinforced my original plan of building with an LBS guy who cares, and buying a nice road bike used. I won't be swapping out parts as soon as I get the bike, so I think in the long run it is a better investment, even if initially it costs more. I have more control over where the money is spent initially too, so I have more money for upgrades on a select few parts I skimped on for now instead of having an overall 'meh' build that isn't worth building up with me. As I have done the math in my head, I figure this build will cost me around $1200, and probably cost close to that much if I tried to buy it off a rack. However, no one would ever build a bike like this and stick it on the rack. I wouldn't get the upgrades where I need them, and have (cheap) bling where I don't (I am looking at YOU, crappy cheap mechanical discs...) Of course, there is also the added bonus of knowing every single component on the bike, and having researched all of them before purchasing, I know enough about bikes to make smart upgrades and future purchases that will work with my riding preferences instead of what an LBS guy says

  40. #40
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    Most of what that dude told you was snobbish, and... well wrong, or at least only partially true.
    1: tuning a coil fork can be more expensive than an air fork, because you have probably will have to replace the coil (since we're on the clyde forum, I think it's safe to assume we're all too heavy for the stock, medium spring). However, a reasonably intelligent person can guess the correct coil on the first guess, and changing it, on every coil fork I've used involved removing one bolt (threaded cap, but still). That's not "taking it apart" in my book, that's 15 seconds with a socket.
    2: servicing a coil fork is the same amount, if not slightly less than an air fork. you have to take them apart to the same level.
    3: if you want a plush ride, it's really hard to beat coils. Rock shox dual and solo air setups are the only ones I've tried that come close, without compromising spring rate/mid stroke. If you want to ride with a lot of preload, as an XC racer guy might, then yes air is the way to go.


    but honestly, it's time to find a new LBS. If it were me, I'd explain to the owner or manager what that dude said, and why I'd never buy anything at his shop, never setting foot in there again, and will tell everyone you know how horrible his employees are. You just don't tell a customer that they need to double their budget to get a bike you think is good enough. If I owned a shop and had an employee acting like that, I'd probably punch him in the nuts before I fired him.

    I had a few experiences like this when I started riding - it's a big part of why I haven't set foot in an LBS in 17 years.

    A friend of mine just got a GT something or other from performance for around $700; hardtail with Deore components, hydraulic brakes and a RS XC28 fork. I wouldn't have a hard time riding a bike like that and enjoying it; and it's considerably better than the bike I paid $3000 for 18 years ago.
    You absolutely don't need a $2000 bike to enjoy riding.

  41. #41
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    Shimano Deore M590 Triple Chainset | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com

    Do you have a crankset yet? I picked one of these up for a low buck build I'm doing for a buddy with three kids. Haven't seen a better value yet.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    Most of what that dude told you was snobbish, and... well wrong, or at least only partially true.
    1: tuning a coil fork can be more expensive than an air fork, because you have probably will have to replace the coil (since we're on the clyde forum, I think it's safe to assume we're all too heavy for the stock, medium spring). However, a reasonably intelligent person can guess the correct coil on the first guess, and changing it, on every coil fork I've used involved removing one bolt (threaded cap, but still). That's not "taking it apart" in my book, that's 15 seconds with a socket.
    2: servicing a coil fork is the same amount, if not slightly less than an air fork. you have to take them apart to the same level.
    3: if you want a plush ride, it's really hard to beat coils. Rock shox dual and solo air setups are the only ones I've tried that come close, without compromising spring rate/mid stroke. If you want to ride with a lot of preload, as an XC racer guy might, then yes air is the way to go.


    but honestly, it's time to find a new LBS. If it were me, I'd explain to the owner or manager what that dude said, and why I'd never buy anything at his shop, never setting foot in there again, and will tell everyone you know how horrible his employees are. You just don't tell a customer that they need to double their budget to get a bike you think is good enough. If I owned a shop and had an employee acting like that, I'd probably punch him in the nuts before I fired him.

    I had a few experiences like this when I started riding - it's a big part of why I haven't set foot in an LBS in 17 years.

    A friend of mine just got a GT something or other from performance for around $700; hardtail with Deore components, hydraulic brakes and a RS XC28 fork. I wouldn't have a hard time riding a bike like that and enjoying it; and it's considerably better than the bike I paid $3000 for 18 years ago.
    You absolutely don't need a $2000 bike to enjoy riding.
    Previously in the thread I posted an LBS rant. Same LBS, and I believe same employee. I went back because I broke my saddle, which had a 90 day warranty on it. I couldn't find my receipt but they exchanged it with no questions. The rest of the guys there seem cool, but for some reason I am always pawned off to this airhead (pun intended!) when I have questions. Maybe he is 'the mountain bike guy' and I am asking about mostly mountain bikes? Anyways, I haven't given them any more business, and only would in a dire emergency/ as a last resort. I found two great places, one where I will buy a nice used road bike next year (they are REALLY busy right now, town is in season. They rent out bikes, and most people are rich old folks who want safe road bikes, so they have a good selection of those.) and the other one has the owner who is going to build my mountain bike. They also are clear across town, takes 40 minutes to get to them.


    As for the crankset, I keep hemming and hawing about what to get, so I threw it on the backburner until I could decide or something really stood out. I made another thread for it Raceface Atlas Cranksets-- Which Model/ year is best? I am so afraid of ****ing up some cheap ones, there is major flex, suck, everything wrong with the no name junk on my crappy bike. It inspires zero confidence, and when I descend, I keep seeing in my mind something snap when I go over a big rock or bumpy section. I take it off the occasional curb to give myself more confidence to try some more difficult skills, even though I know it is a horrible idea for the pot metal components. Maybe it is some sort of subconscious attempt to break something so I REALLY have an excuse to yell at my bike?

    Anyways, I am trying to be hard on the bike without hurting myself, because I kind of want SOMETHING major to break so I have an indication as to where I need to focus the money spent on the new build. But the ****ing thing groans, whines, skids to a slow stop, doesn't roll, drops chains no matter how i adjust it, shifts into only whatever gears it feels like (though I have managed to get the rear derailleur dialed in and quite reliable, the shifters have just lost their 'click' and slip easily), everything to indicate the parts are cheap and not doing me any favors, but nothing is actually breaking! Damn steel and it's durability! The brakes have been the main thing stopping me from really trying to bomb it. I replaced the cantis and have spent HOURS trying to tune them in. I don't have a repair stand so I can't easily remove and replace the wheels, making the adjustments an even bigger nightmare. I wrenched with them some more today, I hope I got them dialed in this time... The upside of having fail brakes is it got me over my descent fears really ****ing quickly, because I have to just blow through everything. The brakes only make things more hairy on the way down

    So, anyways I moved past that choice and have kind of left the cranks until I know how much money I have left. If I spend $300+ on the fork, I will go for a sub $100 crankset (I also have looked at the raceface rides, which can be had for $50. Would you recommend the Deores over those?). But if I get the fork for <$200, I think I might just get the raceface atlas, and run the BB into the ground until it needs replacement (people ***** about it and say you should replace it when you get the set, but maybe I am still a beginner so it will do fine for me for a few years?)

    Please excuse my walls-o-text, I like to think out loud on forums. It helps me work out problems so I know where I am going wrong

  43. #43
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    Personally, I wouldn't buy any race face crank unless it was really, really discounted. The BB issue... that's such a basic engineering thing that's so obviously wrong, it makes me wonder what else they screwed up that's less obvious.
    I don't mind paying for quality, but I don't buy expensive stuff unless I can see why it's worth more; I've concluded that there is no better crank at any price than Shimano SLX.
    Shimano SLX M660-10 Oe Crankset > Shimano OE | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop
    which doesn't include a bottom bracket, so figure another $40, but still a bargain
    there's also:
    Shimano Deore M590 Oe Crankset > Components > Drivetrain > Cranksets | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop
    I'd get that over anything Race Face. It doesn't look bling, so if that's valuable to you...

  44. #44
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    yeah, stick with shimano cranks. strong, light, shift great! this is coming from a rider that currently has both raceface and shimano cranks.

    BTW if you are looking to save money those Deore cranks above are an absolute steel of a price. I have them on my commuter bike and love them

  45. #45
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    Thanks guys!

    I am going for a 9x3 setup. Correct me if I am wrong, but I do need to order a crankset specifically for a 9-speed, correct?

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    Thanks guys!

    I am going for a 9x3 setup. Correct me if I am wrong, but I do need to order a crankset specifically for a 9-speed, correct?

    Not really, 10s rings will work ok on a 9s system. You can always replace the 10s chainrings with 9s versions as they wear out if you want- the rings are the difference between a 3x10 and 9.

    Shimano, Sram and every other crank manufacturer will tell you need to match speeds though. Hasn't been my experience.

  47. #47
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    Nor mine.
    I like turtles

  48. #48
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    Alright! Then the next question is, if I grab a 10 speed crankset for for my 9 speed setup, will both a 3x9 and 3x10 front derailleur work as well? Or do I need to match the front derailleur to the whatever the crank is?

    I think I might pick up those SLX. The best price I could find on 9 speed SLX is around $140, so that is an amazing deal!

    I poked around and found the SLX with bottom bracket for $90 Will grab after work, no time right now!

  49. #49
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    Any 3 speed shifter and derailler combo will work on the 3 ring crankset.
    X7 3x9 along with an x7 derailleur and an SLX front derailleur will work great for not too much money.
    I like turtles

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    I poked around and found the SLX with bottom bracket for $90 Will grab after work, no time right now!

    mind telling us where? At least after you have yours on order? That's the kind of thing I think about stocking up on for future bikes.


    The cage on a 9s front derailleur is slightly wider than 10s. You can make either work (provided the number of speeds matches), but it will be easier to get a 9s version to run rub-free in more gear combos when using a 9s chain.

  51. #51
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    I like turtles

  52. #52
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    Ill post the link when I find it at home I am good at finding great deals, and like to share the love

    Already picked up my shifters. SRAM X9s. Scored the set for $42 bucks shipped, NOS '11 9 speed grip shifters. Proud of that score Got the matching X9 rear derailleur from the same site a few weeks later for $46 shipped. Both came from AwwYeah. I poke through there now everytime I get a few bucks to see if there are some more scores They don't come up all the time on search engine shopping things, so I find stuff on there sometimes that is a good amount lower than even the bigger shops.

    Also saw a complete bike on Nashbar for like $900, full SRAM X9, Rockshox Reba, rocket ron tires. I think they must be losing money on it! Will stick a thread about it in the 'deals' forum when I get home too If I hadn't already started this build, I would have pulled some strings for some quick cash and so picked that bad boy up!

  53. #53
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    BlueSkyCycling.com - Shimano SLX M660 Crankset w/ Bottom Bracket 10 Speed

    $90 for SLX, INCLUDES bottom bracket

    Picked up front Derailleur while I was at it
    BlueSkyCycling.com - Shimano SLX M661 Front Derailleur Bottom Swing 9 Speed

    And, finally, the bike from Nashbar. Will make a thread for it as well for the rest of the forum
    Breezer Thunder Pro with SRAM X-9 Mountain Bike - All Bikes and Frames on Sale

    Still waiting until tomorrow night on the fork bid. Knowing my luck with Ebay, it is going to get sniped for one cent over my max bid at the last moment :/ Someone already poked at my bid after me, but didn't go over. I have a feeling they are going to snipe it

    And that is all the money for a few months >.< I do have another side project going, however. If it gets more involved (all up to the client) I may get a bit more cash sooner

  54. #54
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    Wait... I'm lost. Did you buy that Breezer?
    I like turtles

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    Most of what that dude told you was snobbish, and... well wrong, or at least only partially true.
    1: tuning a coil fork can be more expensive than an air fork, because you have probably will have to replace the coil (since we're on the clyde forum, I think it's safe to assume we're all too heavy for the stock, medium spring). However, a reasonably intelligent person can guess the correct coil on the first guess, and changing it, on every coil fork I've used involved removing one bolt (threaded cap, but still). That's not "taking it apart" in my book, that's 15 seconds with a socket.
    2: servicing a coil fork is the same amount, if not slightly less than an air fork. you have to take them apart to the same level.
    3: if you want a plush ride, it's really hard to beat coils. Rock shox dual and solo air setups are the only ones I've tried that come close, without compromising spring rate/mid stroke. If you want to ride with a lot of preload, as an XC racer guy might, then yes air is the way to go.


    but honestly, it's time to find a new LBS. If it were me, I'd explain to the owner or manager what that dude said, and why I'd never buy anything at his shop, never setting foot in there again, and will tell everyone you know how horrible his employees are. You just don't tell a customer that they need to double their budget to get a bike you think is good enough. If I owned a shop and had an employee acting like that, I'd probably punch him in the nuts before I fired him.

    I had a few experiences like this when I started riding - it's a big part of why I haven't set foot in an LBS in 17 years.

    A friend of mine just got a GT something or other from performance for around $700; hardtail with Deore components, hydraulic brakes and a RS XC28 fork. I wouldn't have a hard time riding a bike like that and enjoying it; and it's considerably better than the bike I paid $3000 for 18 years ago.
    You absolutely don't need a $2000 bike to enjoy riding.
    ...you haven't set foot in a LBS in 17 years?
    ...why I think that's absolutely remarkable!
    My hat goes of to you, sir.
    I still somewhat support the LBS though...they have some parts I like...and some things are difficult to get unless you go through a LBS.
    ....So a good LBS still has a place in the MTB and other bike communities.
    roccowt.
    rocnbikemeld

  56. #56
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    Hope

    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    Wait... I'm lost. Did you buy that Breezer?
    Oh, no, sorry about that. I had just gone off on a tangent about the deal I found and posted the link. I only bought slx crankset and front derailleur. They shipped today

    Also I am about 80% sure the fork will get sniped in a few hours while I am out and not able to bid. I maxed out the bid to all the money I have, but it is probably worth a bit more and will get nabbed. This is why I hate eBay. It causes tons of anxiety and constant dashed hopes. At least with stores, I know how much money I need and can walk away with the item as soon as I plop it down. EBay is a gamble. I hate gambling. I like to work with odds in my favor

  57. #57
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    Ya, fork got sniped :/

    Good news is, I have decided on what fork I want! After lots of research, I am going to keep scouring with hawk eyes for a Manitou Minute Pro for the ~$250 or less range. Based on current prices, I know I can find it for that if I have patience and diligence in checking Stiff coils, rock solid, nothing but good things from everything I have read about it!

    Alright, for those who like to look at numbers, I used the little fit chart on Competitive Cyclist to help me with this. I am going for the 'All Mountain' fit, which is a bit smaller, focus on performance on downhill and control a bit more over good climbing and technical. Sounds like how I ride! This is pretty geeky number stuff, so just a warning now

    Here is the ranges it recommends for me:

    Standover: 26.8 - 27.3in, 680 - 695mm
    Virtual Top Tube Length: 21.4 - 21.8in, ~544 - 554mm
    Stem Length: 57 - 81mm
    BB Saddle Position: 56 - 62in, 1422 - 1575mm
    Saddle - handlebar: 455 - 473mm

    And, here are dimensions of my frame, for Google, since I had trouble finding these and had to measure (also still not 100% sure the 2006 is the year I have, but it is +/- 1 year of that):
    2006? Haro V2, 14" women's? frame:
    C-T seat tube length: 14in, 360mm
    Virtual Top Tube length: 20in, 510mm
    Headtube length: 110mm

    So! Plugging these into my results, it looks like the Top Tube is a bit small for me. I assume I can correct this with a longer stem, correct? Looks like I need another 36mm. Add that to minimum stem length of 57mm, and I need a 110mm stem? Is this correct, or does it not work like this? Something else I should adjust? Setback seatpost, perhaps? Or, gain that inch and a half by pushing the saddle back on the rails? I also have doubts about these measurements, but I measured it three times and looked up where to measure. I found specs for Haro's current offerings, and the geometry on THOSE 14" frames have top tubes within the range of what the calculator said I needed.

    As a side note, I seem to have really short legs. I compared the numbers to other sizing charts, and found that the standover I need is within the XS range, while the top tube is a size bigger. So that may account for why there is a discrepancy in my frame size. The standover is right for me, but the top tube is too small. I guess I can only have one or the other? Looking at road bikes, I oddly found the opposite. The correct seat tube size had way too long of top tubes compared to the numbers I need from the calculator.

    I don't mean to stress too much on numbers, but I really want to get a ballpark for some of the more fit-specific components, such as the stem and seatpost. I am still trying to figure out how to plug all this info in to get the right stuff. How do you figure the minimum length of seatpost you need, for example? Because I see used thudbusters and Thomson seatposts floating around for half off retail, but many times they have been cut or are shorter. The biggest bummer would be to grab one that is too short! Would measuring how much I use on my current ride help? It can't be more than like 5-6 inches on the 16" frame, by the way

  58. #58
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    Also, I am scouring for a Road bike. Definitely want to buy this one complete.

    Now, I was planning on getting a used one at the LBS. I poked around, asked about prices, and they were asking $650 for a used 2011 Fuji Newest 1.0. A bit high, imho, for something that is used, two years old, and pretty basic components. Plus, I looked at the geometry for Fuji, and it is a bad match according to the fitting I did from Competitive Cyclist.

    I basically just took the range for the two least aggressive positions to get these numbers for road bikes:
    Seat Tube Range (c-t) 47.5 - 49cm
    Top Tube 50.1 - 50.5cm
    Stem 8.6 - 10.3cm

    Now, what I have found is the top tube will be a bit long for me on all non women specific frames. For most frames, it is only around 10-15mm too big, which seems quite acceptable. I looked up a few bikes online, and have narrowed it down to three:

    Famous Maker Road Bike with Apex - Overweight Code G Restricted
    Would have pulled the trigger on this with my paycheck today if it was 30 speed and not 20 :/ I am afraid I will still need granny gear until I am in better shape, and the middle gear being so much bigger than what I am used to is quite intimidating...

    Road Bikes, Roadbikes - 2013 Mercier Aquila AL

    Save up to 60% off new Road Bikes - Gravity Liberty 3 | Save up to 60% off new road bikes

    Does the $100 make any difference between these two? Same components, both have carbon forks, same gearing... can't find any info on the budget rims, which is a pretty major concern for me due to my size. If both are crap, I would rather pocket the extra $100 to apply towards better rims/ new ones when I inevitably mess them up

    I could wait another 4 months for the LBS to get some more used stock... but I am REALLY chomping at the bit here! I don't really want to wait, especially if I am just waiting to get the same thing I can get now, but new, with better components, and for the same price! Riding my steel full knobs to work is a drag (literally!) and I would like something I can spin around on at night for a good workout. Small hills and long, short grades just annihilate me on the road, and it makes cruising no fun unless there is dirt and rocks to hop around on

    I have let the pressure go down on my MTB tires, so I am getting better grip on the kitty litter at the cost of more drag on my commute, and thus more cinder block dragging.. ('better' grip is a relative term if you asked me last week when I had a mouthful of the stuff after washing out in it )

  59. #59
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    Xmas was good to me!

    I got the last of the money I needed to finish the build I need a few bucks out of pocket to cover any LBS charges for assembly, and I needed to throw an extra 100 or so in out of pocket for taxes and shipping on a few things. But, otherwise, everything is on it's way! Should I put together what I can to reduce the price I am charged at the LBS? Will it do any good? The wheels need to be trued there for sure, and I don't have any special tools for BB, headset, etc.

    Here is my build. Total out of pocket for parts plus tax and shipping is around $1350 (includes $50 I set aside for tires). I spent much more than planned, but I ended up with a much better bike for it. I am quite happy

    Half the build I have been slowly buying, and I just placed a bunch of orders tonight to finish it. One last group of orders need to be put through once I get a price match from them on the cassette. Also watching ebay for a part in that order in hopes I can save a few more bucks!

    Haro V2 frame ($50)
    Shimano Deore XT Wheelset ($120)
    SRAM X9 twist shifters ($40)
    SRAM X9 Rear Derailleur ($45)
    SRAM PG950 cassette ($23)
    KMC X9 chain ($15)
    Shimano SLX M660 crankset ($90)
    Shimano SLX Front Derailleur ($30)
    Shimano SLX hydro brakes (one is M660, the other is M675, both are the finned Ice Tech versions) ($90 each)
    Shimano RT75 and RT79 rotors, 180mm rear, 203mm front (I believe the 203mm is an Ice Tech rotor, the 180 is a bolt on but was cheap)($15 and $25)
    Adapters for upgraded rotors (the specs I found said the fork is a 74mm, so I hopefully got the right ones...)($10 each)
    Manitou Minute Pro Fork ($310)
    Cane Creek S-1 headset ($25)
    Race Face Deus flat handlebars, 600mm ($20)
    Race Face Evolve stem, 70mm ($20)
    Thomson Elite seatpost (need to decide on a seat clamp, just hoping to snag something cheap on ebay) ($70)
    Wellgo WPD 95B pedals with Sette Enduro shoes ($55)
    (need to grab a saddle from the LBS so I can return it if I hate it)
    (haven't grabbed tires yet, still trying to decide on what to get)($50)


    The only thing I have a question on is the spring for the Manitou Minute. I want to put a firm one in, but all google gives me is a spring for the 29r version/ Tower. Is it the same spring? I ordered the fork from Price Point, and they list the stock spring as a 'medium', though I have read other reviews that say they got a 'firm'. I will wait to order the spring to see what I get, but I asked Price Point to send one with a Firm in it if they have them.

    There will be pics in a month or so! Need time to get it to the LBS, and work season is going to get crazy before I can finish. I am really stoked about this build I think I got a really solid bike here that will do me very nicely for many years! I upgraded the important Clyde parts, saved a bit on everything else by shopping around for killer deals. I will add some better grips, tubeless, and a nice saddle later on once I have some time on this beast

  60. #60
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    Sounds like it's going to be a good bike. Congrats on wrapping up your parts.
    I like turtles

  61. #61
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    Take a look at the Specialized Myka HT sure you may have to save some more money but you can get you a great woman's specific bike for a decent price. They offer the bike in 26" and 29".
    Specialized Bicycle Components
    Specialized Bicycle Components
    Granted the 26" is the low end of the models but for more money you can get the same bike with disc's. I have riding with a female rider that was on one of these in full suspension and it worked great for her, she wasn't a very tall rider either and I believe she was riding a 15" frame. I posted the hardtails because of what you said as far as the money issue.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post

    The only thing I have a question on is the spring for the Manitou Minute. I want to put a firm one in, but all google gives me is a spring for the 29r version/ Tower. Is it the same spring? I ordered the fork from Price Point, and they list the stock spring as a 'medium', though I have read other reviews that say they got a 'firm'. I will wait to order the spring to see what I get, but I asked Price Point to send one with a Firm in it if they have them.
    The tower pro and minute pro use the same spring. How much do you weigh (i havent' read the entire thread but i keep seeing references to Fat Pony, I have no idea how much a fat pony weighs;-)

    I'm 250 and have the tower pro with the new xx clydesdale spring. if you are around 200lbs you certainly should probably go with the x firm. if you are above 220, you should be looking at getting that xx spring. it makes a huge difference.

    My last bit of advice to you is that I really hope you take this thing off road, i know you mentioned wanting it to commute 2 miles to work but this is way too much bike for that, you could have gotten an excellent entry level flat bar road bike for commuting that will be much faster. my gf is 5'3" and rides this bikes direct bike Road Bikes - Dawes Lightning DLX its a solid bike, we upgraded a few parts on it like the crank and i put flat bars on it for her which worked perfect because I wanted to put drops on my original flat bar bike.

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    couple of other thoughts for you, tires could very well run you more than $50 but it's possible they wont. also, Thomson seatpost is probably overkill. don't get me wrong, they are great and sort of the industry standard but again, it doesn't sound like you are going to be starting out much more as a recreational rider. As i've read through more of your thread, I see that you have greatly expanded your budget from where you were starting at but honestly, you can get a perfectly good seatpost for $20 Also, if you didn't buy your fork yet, I think you are dramatically overspending there. It is an excellent fork but are you truly going to be doing serious XC MTB riding? You could save a bundle with a ridgid fork

  64. #64
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    Thanks! I will look around for the XX spring then. May have to go through the LBS, because I am having a hell of a time finding one online (ebay has them, but no indication of type)

    This bike is just for the trail. I currently take my full rigid offroad as much as I can, and I know I hit the limitations of it a month ago. Currently, I hit the trails on every day off I can, so anywhere from 20-100 miles a week, depending on the week. The miles I get on the trails increase every month as I get in better shape! I have been riding a lot since the last update

    Mostly, the braking power on my cheap bike is like trying to stop a semi with brakes from a corolla. The tires are also cheap and dumb, but they do prevent me from doing stupid stuff I rode on a cheap fork before, and I hated it. I would have preferred a rigid fork over that POS. My confidence in the cheap rigid bike I ride is very, very low, but it has surprised me with how well it has held up. Nothing catastrophic *yet*!

    I am going to get slicks for my rigid I am currently riding and make that a commuter. The next bike I get will be a road bike that I can take on long rides and use as a commuter.

    I also scored the Thomson used for $25 on ebay

    It is a lot of bike, but I don't want a shitty bike to be an excuse to not ride. I get bored of the same stuff easily, so the same trail that is the only thing my bike can handle will literally make me uninterested in the sport. This bike will not hold me back, and when I am ready for the tougher stuff I will have a reliable machine ready for me. I am already getting bored of my trails, and I have tried new stuff with varied success. Most of it comes down to things being too steep and I don't have enough brake to keep things in control, and other times too many rocks have made things hairy, though I have gotten pretty decent on those sections taking it nice and slow. I don't like technical as much as I like speed, so picking my way through stuff all the time isn't as much fun as riding fast over most stuff.

    I am the kind of person who doesn't like to get cheap dollar store junk to 'save some money'. I prefer to take my time to shop smart and get high quality purchases that will last and give me great results. This tactic has not served me wrong so far! I spend good money on my computer too, even though I am not a 'hardcore gamer'. But, my computer runs flawlessly, and still at the top of the line 2 years in. It will not need replacing for at least another 4. People who get cheap ones replace them every 2-3 years after at least one or 2 years of constant cursing at the POS. I can play any game I want without looking once at requirements, and they all run flawlessly on high settings. Same thing with a bike. Something that will last for years with basic maintenance, and will handle whatever I throw at it without want for more. Really, forks go over $1000. $300 is the point where you just barely get out of suntours and basic air with no adjustment. Large riders need better forks, cheap ones just don't have the adjustability we need. I would destroy a cheap one! A ton of time and research went into the fork choice. A similar fork from Fox or RockShox would have easily cost over $600. I didn't spend THAT much. I think I did pretty damn well choosing one that fits my needs for a great price!

    Sure, I could have spent 1/3 of the money. I would have gotten 1/10 of the bike, and had constant issues with it and be looking to replace parts constantly. Whatever I saved I would have spent tenfold on constant frustration with my bike and eventually spent the money I 'saved' to get a big kid's bike anyways.

    I will get a cheaper road bike, however Bikes direct bikes have the ones I am looking at, but I also have to consider the costs for the LBS to assemble them. I could do it myself, but I don't know how to true wheels, and I know that is VITAL for me as a large rider to prevent me from destroying them. Also, the cost of assembly is less than a hospital bill because I did something wrong

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    I think you have spent well. I have done almost an identical build myself as my entry into MTB. My only concern was that for a first bike and not knowing if you would stick with it that you were overspending. I wasn't aware that you already had another bike and had been doing some riding already. Sounds like you've got this build dialed in.

    regarding the fork, I keep thinking that you are building a 29er but it's actually a 26er correct? I wasthinking that the minute pro was an older fork but I forgot, it's the same as the tower pro, it's just the minute is for 26" tower for 29. I do agree, for the quality of fork, you would be paying $500 + vs $300ish for the manitou.

    Regarding bikes direct bikes, an LBS should only charge you $50-$100 to put it together. I would advise that you put it together yourself and only have them give the wheels a once over for you after you ride it a few times. What I have found is that some LBS can be very lazy about putting together internet bikes even if they are charging for the service. Those of us with experience know that with a BD bike it's a good idea to take most of it apart and regrease everything (though my bd bike was actually excellent, but it was a $1900 race bike with mavic ksyrium wheels so those are definately all good out of the gate) but a lot of the time these lbs simply assemble and tweak deraileurs, they don't go the extra mile to check everything the way they do when you are buying a new bike from them. The skills you will learn building it yourself are good to have although there is a tool cost that could make it prohibitive. I'm not sure where you live but if there are any cycling clubs to get active with you most certainly will have fellow members that could help you out.

  66. #66
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    you should post up a few pics of the bike you are riding now. i'm curious to see it, I can't believe that there isn't some solution to your braking issues you describe

  67. #67
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    BikePedia - 1996 Diamondback Outlook Complete Bicycle

    It is pretty much stock, the 16" WSD version (so it has the sloped top tube). It is too big for me, but I manage. I put some new brakes on (Shimano Alivos, I believe) because the pads were petrified and fused into the mechanisms, so I couldn't change them. I put a more comfortable saddle on, and some cheap ergo grips. Added some lights and a rack since I commute with it, and some bags to basically carry repair stuff. I need to constantly adjust the seat clamp because I stripped it a month in, raise the post every once in a while when it slips, and adjust my derailleurs when it slips too far out of alignment (I was able to adjust it so I get two of the three front gears, but I can't get all three no matter how I tweak it). Even though things slip and don't work perfect, the damn thing won't BREAK!

    My LBS dilemma is that I have one shop I know will do a good job, but they most likely will charge me close to $300. I have had nothing but bad experiences from another one, but they will do it for 50-100. I kinda gotta suck it up if I want it done right, and I know the expensive place will do it right. Not many options around here either. The other shops turned their noses up at me when I asked about mountain bikes, since most people road bike here.


    Ya, this is a 26er. I will give a 29er a ride at some point, but I need to get a feel for a quality hardtail 26er first, I think. I am not riding too much variety yet, so this is the most versatile option that will do just fine anywhere, and won't be too heavy (I am thinking I will be coming in right around 30 lbs, I will weigh it). Stuff like fat bikes are cool and fun, but very specific. The bug hasn't bitten THAT hard yet! I need to get a road bike before I consider second, third, and fourth mountain bikes

    I also need to get a rack for the garage. Stable is filling up!

  68. #68
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    no way any lbs should be charging you $300 to put a bike together. that is insane. you def need to make cycing friends who have tools and can help you out.

  69. #69
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    Did you purchase assembled wheels or is he building your wheels from scratch?
    I like turtles

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    she got a deal on them with the frame. Rhyno lite rims with xt hubs I believe for $120 for the set. not a bad deal at all!

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    I purchased the preassembled wheelset from him.

    I am speculating on price based on some numbers he threw around for services last time we spoke. I need to give him a call to get a firm price and see if I can do anything here to keep it under $100. Last time we spoke, he said he could do a full component swap (take parts off one bike and put on a bare frame) for $100, and he charges I think $65 for tuneups. Both of those prices are around 20-30% higher than the shitty LBS prices. I would like him to set me up with tubeless too, if he can do it cheap. Going to ask him about that too. I know the kit alone costs $70 for my rims (Rhyno Lites, needs a conversion kit because they aren't tubeless ready) so if he is willing to do it for $80, I will bite. One big advantage about the Hans Dampf is everyone says they are super easy to convert to tubeless. Might need to wait on that, some checks for work I have done have not some in yet, and I haven't been getting as many hours early in season as I had hoped :/

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    Tubeless conversion is pretty easy, but for my personal preference I like tubeless specific wheels from the get go for people our weight. I don't want to risk tire blowing off the bead.

    I'm from the school that tuning the bike is part of the assembly process so when he says $100 to do a component swap that should include the tuning. Also, seems like you are buying a lot of new components so hes not even going to be taking much off the old bike right?

  73. #73
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    Nothing is coming off the old bike, the whole thing is new!

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    Def shouldn't be charging you more than 100 im not a pro mechanic but if you gave me a bunch of loose parts i could build it in 2 hours max probably an hour. Regarding tubeless, i advise you to do it yourself so you have a full understanding how it works. Failures happen with tubeless and you should be comfortable with swapping in a tube and then knowing how to remount later at home if needed

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  75. #75
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    Alright! Some updates on the build progress!

    Further research, and I found that getting a 9mm through axle for a nice fork like I have would be a complete waste. So, I upgraded it to the 20mm version for another $50, which also meant I needed a new hub to replace the XT 9mm on the wheelset.

    I found a NOS GT Hadley on Ebay for $50, which seemed like a screaming deal, and I jumped on it. I knew it was 4-bolt when I got it, but a quick google found lots of 4-bolt rotors around, so I wasn't worried. The spoke length it needed was also only 1mm off from what the wheelset was laced with, so everything could be reused. Seemed to be a good plan.

    Then I went to the task of buying the rotor. I found there were THREE different standards floating around for 4-bolt, and finding BCDs for all of them was a nightmare. It took me WEEKS to track down the numbers. Here is what I found:

    Coda: 44mm
    Rohloff: 65mm
    Formula: 44mm or 45mm (don't remember)

    I measured my GT Hadley hub again, and again, and again, thinking I must be measuring something wrong to not be coming up with any of those BCDs. I consulted multiple guides to confirm I was using the right formulas and measuring in the right places. I was. I figured it was just me and it must be Rohloff, so I ordered one. There was stupidity with the shipping, and I cancelled the order a day later to reset the order. It was a good thing too...

    Now it had been 3 weeks, and I was getting REALLY anxious about this. I started to ask around, and no one had answers for me. GT told me to ask my LBS (HA), and most shops shrugged their shoulders and said they didn't know. Then I found this. Originally, where it says 'pitch', it was listed as '44mm'. I knew that wasn't what MY GT Hadley had, so I emailed them. It was a mistranslation, I was told, and it was fixed the next day. So, right there is my answer. This old 4-bolt GT Hadley hub has a BCD/ pitch of 70mm. It does NOT fit any standard readily available, and ONLY fits a specific GT standard. That seller is the only one I found who carries the rotor. I got a quote for 183mm and 203mm, and after shipping, I would be spending more on the rotor than I did on the hub. So much for saving money. I will try to relist it on ebay and get back what I spent. I am pretty miffed about it.

    While contemplating how to proceed, Speedgoat has been running a huge clearance sale. There, in the clearance sale, was a Hope 2 Evo front hub. Blue, 20mm/ 110mm. 36h, however, which would mean new rims. $43 plus shipping. Wow. I poked around and looked at other options. An XT 20mm front hub, which would mean a straight swap on the wheelset without upgrading or downgrading, was $60. I already have an extra centerlock rotor lying around too, so it seemed to be the cheapest option. Then I plugged it into the calculator. The spokes are off by a few mm, so I would have to get new spokes too. Well, ****. If I have to get spokes anyways, I guess I might as well upgrade to the Hope, eh? a 36h Rhynolite rim can be had for $20, and a 6-bolt rotor for $10. $13 extra to upgrade. Seems like a good deal

    I also changed the pedals, as Price Point stopped running their combo with the Sette Enduro shoes and Wellgo pedals for $55. I got some Wellgo MG-1's instead, will get shoes later. Got a good price on a Salsa seatpost clamp. Due to the amount of praise from other Clydes, I am trying out a WTB Pure V Race for the saddle. Found the Thompson Elite seatpost used on Ebay for $45 or so, it's in great shape. ESI Chunky grips get a lot of props around here, and are cheap, so I grabbed some of those. I am running the Hans Dampfs with tubes for now, will consider tubeless down the road

    I have what I can get together right now on the frame. I am waiting on the stuff to build the front wheel (hub, rim, spokes, and rotor), and some derailleur housing. Oh, also some tubes for the smaller tires I ordered for my commuter.

    I will ride the Manitou Minute Pro fork right now with the factory spring and see if I need to change it, but I ordered an extra-firm to swap if I don't like it. Also have some nice thick suspension oil to help firm it up as well. I am not confident enough to open up the fork yet, and am still trying to get my head around the adjustments! I have never ridden good suspension before, so I don't have much of a baseline. I suppose I will set everything to factory recommendations and go from there

    I also ended up with some unintentional bling I ordered an SLX front derailleur, paid SLX price (like $25-$30), the package it came in SAID SLX, and when I opened it up to install, inside was an XTR SWEET! It looks all blingy

    A shout out to all that have helped me! Everyone in this thread, thank you Mr. Magura has been helping behind the scenes as well, I will post a picture of the brake mod he helped me with once I get my cockpit set up. Tree Fort Bikes has earned my business again and again with their fantastic prices, selection, and customer service. Outside Outfitters hooked me up with the fork, and tracked down the spring for me, both on special order! They also worked with me on my odd form of payment (a bunch of Visa gift cards) and everything went smooth! Really great customer service, kept communication up with me the entire time! Brake-stuff.de, thanks for finally putting my hub questions to rest. Give all those stores your love, guys. They deserve it!

    I can't wait to post pictures of this build. Rounding the corner on it, and I am DYING to ride it!

  76. #76
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    Sounds great. You have WAY more patience than I do... I would never have taken all that time with the front hub/ wheel/ fork/ brake combo.
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  77. #77
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    Alright, I officially have A BIKE.

    A REAL, big kid's bike.

    Clydesdale? Athena? More like a fat pony :|-bike.jpg

    Let's see if I can remember the exact specs...

    Haro V2 frame, 14"
    Thompson Elite seatpost
    WTB Pure V saddle
    Salsa seatclamp
    Manitou Minute Pro fork, 120mm, 20mm thru-axle
    Hans Dampf tires 2.35", downhill spec tubes (they are PORKY and HEAVY.)
    Rhyno Lite rims, front hub is Hope 2 Evo, rear is Shimano XT
    SRAM X9 grip shifters
    SRAM X9 rear derailleur (9 speed)
    Shimano XTR front derailleur (a bonus! I ordered SLX, I received a derailleur in OEM packaging marked as SLX, inside was an XTR. I ain't complaining. )
    Shimano SLX Hydro brakes
    203mm front rotor, 185mm rear
    SRAM 950 cassette
    KMC chain (X9, maybe?)
    Shimano SLX crankset
    Wellgo MG-1 pedals
    Raceface Dues handlebars
    FSA Orbit Extreme Pro headset
    Syncros AM V2 stem (60 or 70mm, don't remember)
    Jagwire housing, ran full length for rear derailleur (lack of proper cable guides on frame prevented the front from working). Had to drill out the guides on the frame for everything. The derailleur ones turned out nice. The brake guides needed a lot more removed, and turned out a bit of a mess. Still need zip ties, as you can see, because there just plain aren't enough guides anyways.


    Clydesdale? Athena? More like a fat pony :|-frontwheel.jpg
    I hand built my first wheel! The front one! Hope 2 EVO hub, some double butted spokes from Dan's Competition, Rhyno Lite rims. The wheelset I bought had the 9mm QR in the front, and I realized that such a beautiful fork as the Manitou Minute Pro would be wasted on anything less than 20mm through-axle, so a new wheel was needed. I trued it by sticking it in the fork, and spinning the wheel between a set of calipers. I got a nice true!

    Clydesdale? Athena? More like a fat pony :|-rearwheel.jpg
    Rear wheel was from the wheelset I bought, way back in the beginning. XT hub laced to a Rhyno Lite rim.

    Clydesdale? Athena? More like a fat pony :|-brakemod.jpg
    Mr. Magura helped me with this mod, sent me the handy tool I needed to remove the blanking screw and even made me the hex screws I needed for it! Now, My SLX is upgraded to XT, cause it now has stroke adjust too

    Clydesdale? Athena? More like a fat pony :|-handlebars.jpg
    My handlebar setup. Raceface Dues handlebars. SO LIGHT. I weighed them, and I seem to recall them hovering a bit over 200g, maybe 213 or something like that. SLX Hydro, SRAM X9 shifters, ESI Chunky grips (need to trim them once I settle on cockpit config), Syncros AM V2 headset (60 or 70mm, don't remember), bunch of headset spacers to try out height (I think it is too tall now, will lower it next ride), FSA Orbit Extreme Pro headset with compression plug instead of star nut so I can adjust the headset without committing


    Clydesdale? Athena? More like a fat pony :|-hydrofluidandracetool.jpg
    This is the hydro fluid I used. Everyone seemed to particularly recommend the Pentosin CHF 7.1 as an upgrade over Shimano stuff. However, it has been discontinued and is very difficult to find for a decent price. I went to all the auto parts stores in town trying to track it down, and finally ended up at Napa Auto. The guy knew exactly what I needed, but didn't have any left. His computer had this German stuff listed as the replacement, called simply '6162'. It was a little over 10 bucks for the liter after tax. I messed up the bleed (don't want to talk about it, very noob mistake I caught at the end but was too exhausted from troubleshooting it so long to fix it) but will fix the brake in the next couple of days.

    Next to it is what I used to set the crown race! It was on the clearance shelf at Ace, and is some piece of chromed pipe for plumbing. The end has a cap on it, which gives it the PERFECT sized lip to put over the race. I can't imagine the professional one could be any better! It was cheaper than a piece of pipe too, I think I paid like 4 bucks and some change for it. Few taps, done.



    Now, how does it RIDE?

    I took it up and down the street for testing, adjusted, took it around some more. When I was building it up, I was seriously shaking my head at it, thinking 'This thing is gonna ride like a pig...'. I mean, LOOK AT IT. Short everywhere, fat tires, heavy rims and tubes, weight I imagine comes in over 35lbs... (but it is still lighter than my Diamondback CroMoly beast!). All I can say is... WOW. Way, WAY better ride than I had imagined! It feels like a freaking escalator uphill! Miles of improvement over my old bike. I think it was holding me back even more than I realized!

    Once I got everything tweaked, shifts are smooth as silk. Don't even feel it most of the time. No clunk. Turn, I am there.

    These hydro brakes with the huge rotors... ya, I felt like I was going to rip the knobs right off my tires if I wasn't careful. I foresee a *few* booboos due to getting thrown by the uber strong brakes. Oh, and did I mention the rear brake wasn't even working? Ya. WOW. Strong!

    The fork needs a lot of tweaking. Lots of brake dive, I adjust everything as best as I can. I am not sure I trust myself to do the spring swap after my brake blunder, so I may pay the LBS to do that for me. I have some extra heavy fork oil that may help too, but the high pressure just just isn't doing it with the medium spring. I used half the travel just tooling around the block doing wheel lifts.

    The geometry is the biggest WOW. HUGE difference when the bike is better proportioned for me! I had WAY more confidence, balance, strength, everything. It was a breeze to move my weight to the back wheel, as that is where I naturally found myself. When standing in the pedals, I don't have to stretch myself and get a bit wobbly trying to move over the back. I am where I need to be the moment I stand up, and can easily move myself where I need to with small shifts.

    Turns are sharp and responsive and feel completely controlled, and the wheels stick like glue. But it was only asphalt, so the trails will be a true measure here. I have a showdown scheduled with some sand traps


    This bad-ass needs a name. Low key, looks like a pig, but is actually super fast, grippy, and stops on a dime. I'm sure it is not the fastest bike out there, but it surprised the **** out of me! A down and dirty serious business machine. We will be going on many adventures together... once I fix her brakes. And give her a proper name, that is I won't bore you with details of how I will accessorize... but she anxiously awaits the day I make it to a craft store so I can make her streamers I'll take some more pics once I get some cool stuff on her.

    Oh! And, once last thing! How the hell do I register a custom bike and declare value, etc. to protect it if (HEADS WILL ROLL IF THERE IS AN 'IF') it gets stolen. I have renter's insurance and such, which from what I can tell, would cover theft. And, of course, I need proof of ownership and registration for cops and such.


    *happy dance*

    Wednesday can't come soon enough... that is when my next day off is...

  78. #78
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    Re: Clydesdale? Athena? More like a fat pony :|

    Nice work. I had a bike stolen, all my renters insurance required was a police report and a receipt. Ask the guy at your shop to give you a nice "receipt" showing a good high value or you can still be screwed by the deductible.

    Re: the fork. I'm 250lbs and the x firm wasn't stout enough, I needed the xx firm and 150 psi

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  79. #79
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    My insurance company just told me to keep receipts, the serial number of the frame and I also keep a pic folder of tools, bikes and things that would be difficult to describe.

    Your bike came out awesome. I'm completely impressed that you built your own wheel.
    Enjoy ridin' the crap out of it.
    I call my Chevy Suburban Aretha Franklin 'cause she's big and black. I'll see if I can be helpful naming your bike.
    I like turtles

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    Re: Clydesdale? Athena? More like a fat pony :|

    BTW, vet it weighed if you can. I'm curious. No way its 35lbs. My 29er with an xl frame comes in at 29.5lbs I can vet it down to 27.5 with a simple tire change

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  81. #81
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    Skull Cable Guides by Moment | Moment Industries

    Maybe this will help with the brake hose routing.
    I like turtles

  82. #82
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    The wheelset with the beefy rhyno lites, huge reinforced hans damphs (I seem to recall over 1000g in each tire alone), and DH tubes (seem to recall those coming in over 600g) is probably close to half the weight. The fork is deceptively light for how big it is, aluminum frame weighs nothing, and higher end stuff throughout is entry level weight weenie.

    I have an old scale that has been dropped half a dozen times. I only trust it to ballpark myself. I will stick the bike on it though, and see what it tells me. I would give that scale easily +/- 5lbs off from actual weight!

    Oh, and a silly noob question; am I supposed to grease the seatpost? I read people teasing others for doing it, and others listing it on their list of places to make sure to grease... and where do i grease it? The clamp? Seat tube? Won't it make the post slide down...? I was getting serious creaking after about 15 minutes of riding, cant't tell if it is the saddle or post clamp. It sure as hell better not be the frame!

    The skulls are total cheese, but look like what I need. Is there a particular name to those kinds of guides that make a new one for you instead of modifying the old ones?

  83. #83
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    I grease seatposts. Place a little grease inside the frame and a light coating on the length of post that will be in the frame. Install it and wipe off the excess.

    I know the skulls are cheesy but they fit the bill.
    I like turtles

  84. #84
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    Problem Solvers

    I also found these.

    Also, your front brake hose needs to run inside the fork leg.
    Last edited by NYrr496; 03-29-2013 at 02:59 PM.
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  85. #85
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    i put a VERY THIN layer of grease on a seatpost. if it's a carbon seatpost the grease is replaced with carbon assembly paste.

    As for your DH tubes. Get rid of them. That is ridiculous. I have a 29er. I just weighed out both of my spare 29er tubes ( i ride tubeless but just have these in case) and they are both 160 grams. There is no need for a 600 gram tube. holy shite is that ever gonna slow you down. and again, I'm 250lbs and the rides I did with tubes in, I had no problems with pinch flats. granted, I was missing out on running lower pressures but as a newb I was just trying to get a feel for the trails and the bike and it served me well.

  86. #86
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    Just found your thread tonight and I have to start by congratulating your on your new bike. It's great to hear that you like the way it rides, it would be heart braking to go through months of gathering parts, putting in all that time and effort and then ending up with a bike that didn't really fit you, so good to hear it works.

    I must say I'm impressed with your build, starting from scratch, doing a lot of the work yourself including building the wheels, you rock!

    Now go get it dirty and enjoy the hell out of it!

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    Re: Clydesdale? Athena? More like a fat pony :|

    Oh yeah. Tires I'm riding now are geax sturdy which are about 1000 I had some geax mezcals which were almost half the weight but no knobs on them. For the trails near me I need the knobs. Pic the tire based on the terrain, not the weight

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  88. #88
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    The front brake hose is also a bit long, but not as bad as the rear. I wanted to trim and bleed the rear first, in case I noobed it up. Which I did. It is zip tied to the back of the fork, but I am not sure if there is a different routing method off the cockpit that I should use, or if it is just too long. I had tons of trouble getting a straight answer about how to route stuff, and instead just found long-winded rants about different people, different bikes, crappy guide placement (a point I wholeheartedly agree with... ) and a suggestion to cross lines (so the right shifter line comes back from the left side of the headtube, etc.) So if stuff looks fubar, let me know!

    I stuck my spare tube on the scale out of curiosity. 463g. Oof.

    Balancing the bike on the scale, I get 32lbs. Doing the 'ol 'get on the scale, take my weight, grab the bike, subtract my weight' gives roughly 27. Your guess is as good as mine!

    My tires were something I stressed over, knowing there is both sand and goatheads out here. I chose the tires for something grippy but big that will help me float. The rear I will swap out for something faster once I get a feel for what I have. I have had a problem with losing my back end in the loose **** here (my two worst dumps I lost the rear while going through loose stuff) so whatever I decide to put back there will still be fairly grippy. I also ran my shitty leechee whatever mtb tires on the Diamondback with 29psi front, 32 rear. Amazing performance and dampening. It greatly improved traction in sand and took a lot of harshness out of the ride. I am sold on low pressure! I wanted to go tubeless, but realized I would be pushing my luck being a fat pony with non-ust rims and tires.

  89. #89
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    I didn't think you were going to build anything near as nice as this when you started out...this is really really nice!
    I hope you enjoy every second with it.
    Z
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  90. #90
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    I didn't think I was going to go this nice either!

    I really just wanted to get on the trails, and once I did that on my crappy bike, the itch for a new bike died down a bit and I had more patience to do it right

  91. #91
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    Shows what patience can do.
    Patience is to keep.
    Ride it well.
    Z
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  92. #92
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    Did some rough math. Roughly $1400 spent on components and parts specific to the build. Maybe another $200 for tools and extra bits that are now in my toolbag. Maybe a final $150 in taxes and ocasional shipping charge. I expect almost every part will outlast the frame! Pretty much every part is known for durability and reliability... except the entry level frame.

    It's all good. It gives me a good excuse to upgrade to full suspension once it cracks

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    Did some rough math. Roughly $1400 spent on components and parts specific to the build. Maybe another $200 for tools and extra bits that are now in my toolbag. Maybe a final $150 in taxes and ocasional shipping charge. I expect almost every part will outlast the frame! Pretty much every part is known for durability and reliability... except the entry level frame.

    It's all good. It gives me a good excuse to upgrade to full suspension once it cracks
    Chek your PMs
    Z
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    rocnbikemeld

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    Thanks! Will keep my eye out. I wish I had $500 to spend right now, cause I know of a small frame full suspension bike with a really decent component spec, only missing the rear shock, in an online bargain bin. I ended up with extra parts, so I could upgrade a few things right off the bat (like XT Hydro and shifters. I got a pair of dual control WITH calipers for $90, brand new take-offs) and pair it with one of the cheap ass Zee derailleurs I always see in the bargain bins. Totally bombable

    Took my bike around the block for a longer test (no rear brake, so I intentionally didn't wear my pads so I wouldn't be tempted to do stupid stuff. And trust me, I was ) and got clicking on the non-drive side of the crank/ bottom bracket/ pedals. I will double check everything and see if I can't figure it out.

    Climbing didn't feel nearly as strong as my initial test. It could be a mixture of having lots of rest and energy that day, being exhausted today after a long day running around at work, and the whole 'SQUEE NEW BIKE' effect. The speed kept sneaking up on me too, which I had to watch cause of the brake issue. She really flies when she gets going! I took a corner too quickly that connected a dirt path to a paved one, and completely overshot the path. I would have crashed on my Diamondback, but it felt intentional with how smooth it took it Definitely need to put the xtra-firm spring in too. Way too much pogo and brake dive (brake dive is possibly due to lack of rear brake). It is *fine* for now, but I got a nice fork, I don't want it to perform like a cheap one. Will look into it soon.

  95. #95
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    Maya, check your PM's.

  96. #96
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    I like turtles

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    Maya, at 5'3" and 26" wheels, you need a 160mm rotor up front and probably a 160mm rotor in the rear too... the big stuff you have on there is for fat old guys on 29" wheels, or the down hill gravity assist crowd. The 160 mm rotors will give you more feel before locking up, ie more modulation, which is what brake control is all about.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boyonadyke View Post
    Maya, at 5'3" and 26" wheels, you need a 160mm rotor up front and probably a 160mm rotor in the rear too... the big stuff you have on there is for fat old guys on 29" wheels, or the down hill gravity assist crowd. The 160 mm rotors will give you more feel before locking up, ie more modulation, which is what brake control is all about.
    Or, just old guys period, on 29ers, who like to bomb down steep chunk with reckless abandon.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Optimus View Post
    Or, just old guys period, on 29ers, who like to bomb down steep chunk with reckless abandon.
    ...drunk??
    roccowt.
    rocnbikemeld

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by zarr View Post
    ...drunk??
    No, clean and sober for 21 years. I just like a little adrenaline rush every now and then.

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