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  1. #1
    NormalNorm
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    Clydes racing.......

    Do any of you Clydesdales race competively and/or do well at racing. I've tried a few races and find it hard with the extra weight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by norm
    Do any of you Clydesdales race competively and/or do well at racing. I've tried a few races and find it hard with the extra weight.

    this is my first post on this "clydsdale" forum, I may net even be in the definition of "clydesdale". I am 6'0, and weigh 210, but the shear abuse i put a bike through is "clydesdal-worthy"

    Now for the answer to your question, if you ever watch the TDF(tour de france) the vast majority of those riders competing are 6'2 plus, the reason for that is this thing called mehcanical advatage. just because you weigh 200+ pounds doesn't mean you can't ride (any style of riding) as fast as the puny pathetic eat them for lunch 145 pounders, the only real differece that you will notice is that if you ride as fast as those smaller guys you will go through parts faster, and when i say fast i mean a new chain/cassete monthly or bi-monthly, or even the fact that a fram will fell like a wet noodle under you in less than a year. The only draw back to being big is that most parts on the market aren't designed for big strong people, I for example go through tire like no other, becuase I rip the center knobs off the tire when i accelerate.

  3. #3
    Too many Sedonuts...
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    Quote Originally Posted by norm
    Do any of you Clydesdales race competively and/or do well at racing. I've tried a few races and find it hard with the extra weight.
    I just finished a 5-race state championship series in Arizona and they have a class for guys over 220lbs. I'm 6'4" and I weigh about 225 naked. I got 4th overall for the series, (maybe better if I hadn't been disqualified in the first race) and found that our times were competitive with the upper quarter of the beginner age 30-39 class. I am by no means a "serious" racer, more of a weekend warrior. The extra weight does slow you down on the climbs, no doubt. I think if I had the body fat percentage of a pro I'd be much faster uphill, assuming I retained the same strength. Of course I'd probably weigh 190 too.

    I think I read somewhere that the heaviest rider in the TdF last year weighed in at 219lbs.

  4. #4
    SSasquatch
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    Magnus Backstedt (Liquigas) is the guy... He's 6'3" and did weigh in at 219 but I think the weight has gone down some though. Regardless, pretty impressive to see a guy that size compete at that level even if he is just a domestique and competing for sprint points. This year he dropped out at the beginning of stage 13.

  5. #5
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Big and Tall Riders

    I raced competively in the collegiate ranks for 2 years. I am 6'7" and 200lbs. I have had no problems with cycling and am getting better exponentially. If you put your mind too it you can go out there and have fun and improve as well. Their are plenty of big guys out there racing and doing well. Many are even bigger than me!!!!
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Legend911
    I raced competively in the collegiate ranks for 2 years. I am 6'7" and 200lbs. I have had no problems with cycling and am getting better exponentially. If you put your mind too it you can go out there and have fun and improve as well. Their are plenty of big guys out there racing and doing well. Many are even bigger than me!!!!
    6'7" and 2bills??? Dude, you're skinny!

  7. #7
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Tall and skinny but still a Clysedale

    Yeah, I am skinny in my upper body and arms. My lower body is really strong. Only reason I weight 200lbs is because I am 4.2% bodyfat. Since muscle weighs more than fat I tend to weigh more than I look. Scientifically I should weigh 235-240 to look normal lol but then would I be a good cyclists???

    200lbs is a clysedale though right. I have never ridden in the clyesdale class before.
    2004-2006 - JMU Cycling Club
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  8. #8
    Have Cake and beat it 2
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    I'm 6'1 and 220 pounds and ride and race in mtb orienteering, I have been consisently getting 3rd this year against a 14yr old and a 60yr old, both either small or light, and know of another clysdale who races in the NSW circuit OZMTBO and can get within the top ten and higher. Just remember, speed isn't everything.

  9. #9
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
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    I've raced more 'n a bit at this point, can't say I'm exceedingly competitive but I have finished before other people who have finished.

    Maybe if I stop stopping and taking pictures of the support people I'd do better?


  10. #10
    I can't weld
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    Oklahoma has a great race series- the Tour de Dirt. Six races in the spring and four more in the fall after the temps come down. I've done four so far - all seconds and thirds, but we rarely start more then 5 in Clydesdale. We usually get mixed in with the 50+ beginners to make a good starting group. Lots of fun. You get to know your competitors well since the group is small. The funny thing is that no promoter remembers to bring a scale, so they have to take your weight at your word. They start to question your honesty when they see you after dropping 8# of sweat during the race.
    I'm trying to drop that last 10# so I'm below 200# in riding gear and move into the 30-39 age group since I'm getting beat by guys in Clydesdale that are 15 years older than me.

    Check out my sponsorhouse.com website: http://www.sponsorhouse.com/members/indiefab

  11. #11
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    Your a clydesdale.....so what. So we drink beer the night before, and hell sometimes the day of.....I truely see mtb racing as just another excuse to get together with those skinny guys, talk crap and by the end the season you too will have lost some considerable weight. I am a clyde and begining of season finished 8th or 10th in cycles and by the end of season I won the last race. Never changed a bit in eating habit, training etc. But it is what I love and if you have as much passion..... as you must if you race.....you will get better and better. I was second for the 12 race series at the season end. Persistance is key! Good luck......!!

  12. #12
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    I'm looking forward to my first race on Aug. 26th. I've considered trying racing for the last few years so this year, with my wife's encouragement, I'm going to do it. Other than just have fun, are there any recomendations for my first race ? Thanks.

  13. #13
    The Amazing Shrinking Man
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    Quote Originally Posted by Legend911
    Yeah, I am skinny in my upper body and arms. My lower body is really strong. Only reason I weight 200lbs is because I am 4.2% bodyfat. Since muscle weighs more than fat I tend to weigh more than I look. Scientifically I should weigh 235-240 to look normal lol but then would I be a good cyclists???

    200lbs is a clysedale though right. I have never ridden in the clyesdale class before.
    So what you are sayin'...You have the typical cyclists build! Oak stumps for legs and the biceps of an anorexic 12 year old!

    (I know the feeling!)
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  14. #14
    Making fat cool since '71
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    That gets expensive...

    Quote Originally Posted by guardman519
    this is my first post on this "clydsdale" forum, I may net even be in the definition of "clydesdale". I am 6'0, and weigh 210, but the shear abuse i put a bike through is "clydesdal-worthy"

    Now for the answer to your question, if you ever watch the TDF(tour de france) the vast majority of those riders competing are 6'2 plus, the reason for that is this thing called mehcanical advatage. just because you weigh 200+ pounds doesn't mean you can't ride (any style of riding) as fast as the puny pathetic eat them for lunch 145 pounders, the only real differece that you will notice is that if you ride as fast as those smaller guys you will go through parts faster, and when i say fast i mean a new chain/cassete monthly or bi-monthly, or even the fact that a fram will fell like a wet noodle under you in less than a year. The only draw back to being big is that most parts on the market aren't designed for big strong people, I for example go through tire like no other, becuase I rip the center knobs off the tire when i accelerate.
    I'm 6'3" @ 250 and more of the typical football build as opposed to "typical" cyclist build (meaning: strong all over, still, but it won't last...) and while I can still pound a weight or two and have been known to squat a bit of poundage I'm not ripping through cassettes *that* quick. I do go through chains though. Bearings and chains are my biggest problems (besides chocolate). Tall knobbed tires tear pretty readily for most of us I fear. BTW: about a third (give or take) of "the tour" riders are 6'+ and a very small handful even near 200#. Most are 160 or under.

    To the OP's question: I participated in my first XC "race" two weeks ago. It was a 12/24 race. We had a 4 person Clyde team (one wasn't really a clyde, but he was 60 years old). We finished last, but three of our lap times were the same as the average for four person teams.

    Brock...
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    Disciples Of Dirt, come ride with us.

  15. #15
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    Im a 6ft 2in 245 lb clyde....

    that has done about 4 races, 1 mtb race and 3 off-road sprint triathalon's. In my experience im usually far and away the biggest guy racing. most "clydesdales" seem to be around 225 lbs and below. I just go out and try to have fun and push myself. Ive managed to get on the podium twice (2nd and a 3rd) which was a major shock . Cycling is the one sport where all the advantages belong to the little guys. oh, and the jockeys in horse racing . Here is my weapon of choice for next season, a Ted Wojcik steel 29er . Im gonna have fun no matter what ! .
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  16. #16
    Made in China
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    DUDE!!!!! 245lbs and V-brakes? How many set of pads do you need a week?
    "Didn't your doctor tell you to stop smoking and drinking?" George Burns "Yes but they all died"

  17. #17
    Double-metric mtb man
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    I haven't done racing yet..though it is on my adgenda for next year (we're getting into snow season up here in Alberta, Canada).

    Us Clydes (I'm 6' 235#) can get moving well enough... I got a little miffed at a roadie the other day for giving me "the look" and proceeded to hand him his pedals with my heavy XC / light AM machine while riding along a secondary highway. Thing is, I kept that pace up for over 20 km coming back into town. Sure, there are more thin folks who will blow us into the bushes, but that doesn't mean we can't be fast...we just need to work harder at it.
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  18. #18
    29 some of the time...
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    I am 6'3" 240lb with gear. I typically race 4-5 clyde xc races during a season. For the most part the clyde xc class is split into 2 categories (1)Serious racers who are strong enough to place well in sport/expert class (2)everyone else. The latter will spread out. I am usually mid-bottom of the pack in clyde xc races. I go out and have fun. I ride courses and locations that I wouldn't normally ride, so it is all good

    I usually race 3-4 dh races during the year as well. These I typically finish in the faster half of the pack and I typically enjoy a bit more since gravity assisted riding suits my clyde stature best. Of course there is no clyde class for dh

  19. #19
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    I'd like to do a race or two just to say I did it... if I can find some shorter races, I may give it a go.. I have no desire to do any of the endurance type races, I'm more of a sprinter.

  20. #20
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    Not Many...

    Quote Originally Posted by duke777
    DUDE!!!!! 245lbs and V-brakes? How many set of pads do you need a week?
    I dont live near mountains so my brakes last a long time. nothing but short, steep climbs and down hills. you must remember, EVERYBODY rode v-brakes back in the day, no matter how big they were or how big the mountains they climbed/descended. people didnt start riding fast/big climbs/steep descents with the advent of disc brakes .
    I went out to South Mountain in AZ a couple of years ago and rode up and down for a week with v-brakes and had a blast . outside of wet weather riding, I dont feel a need for disc's.
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  21. #21
    Making fat cool since '71
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    Too true...

    Quote Originally Posted by edouble
    I dont live near mountains so my brakes last a long time. nothing but short, steep climbs and down hills. you must remember, EVERYBODY rode v-brakes back in the day, no matter how big they were or how big the mountains they climbed/descended. people didnt start riding fast/big climbs/steep descents with the advent of disc brakes .
    I went out to South Mountain in AZ a couple of years ago and rode up and down for a week with v-brakes and had a blast . outside of wet weather riding, I dont feel a need for disc's.
    Imagine this:

    A fairly newby to mtb's, riding a rigid (steel) bike with cantilever brakes (not even linear pull...) riding Slickrock in '92, @ 290lbs. It's only been a decade (and a bit) but that sort of thing seems sooo not good now it's sort of funny. I thought that bike was awesome and now if I ride to anywhere other than the store on a rigid I'm missing my full-squish and discs, and indexed shifting, and...

    Ahh, the good ol' days of having a tube pop cuz the rim was so freakin hot. Lovely. Carry on.

    Brock...
    Are the wheels roundish? Ride it.

    Disciples Of Dirt, come ride with us.

  22. #22
    Glad to Be Alive
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    don't make excuses......train harder
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  23. #23
    mtbr member
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    Let me see...

    Quote Originally Posted by ImaKlyde
    Imagine this:

    A fairly newby to mtb's, riding a rigid (steel) bike with cantilever brakes (not even linear pull...) riding Slickrock in '92, @ 290lbs. It's only been a decade (and a bit) but that sort of thing seems sooo not good now it's sort of funny. I thought that bike was awesome and now if I ride to anywhere other than the store on a rigid I'm missing my full-squish and discs, and indexed shifting, and...

    Ahh, the good ol' days of having a tube pop cuz the rim was so freakin hot. Lovely. Carry on.

    Brock...
    riding slickrock...@290 lbs...w/cantilever brakes ...lived to tell about it...im riding east coast rocks and roots...@245 lbs....with V-BRAKES ...I think I dont have anything to worry about, its all good .
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