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  1. #1
    Zip
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    Clydes loosing weight/ maintaining on protein diet

    I'm just wondering if there are any big men/women out there using a low carb diet to maintain/loose weight and/or to perform in marathon type events. I usually feel so sluggish when I eat carbs before I ride (come to think of it, it's all the time) that I'm thinking about changing my protien to carbs ratio. I know it should be something like a 50/30/20 (protien/carbs/fats) but I'm woundering about going with a 60-70/10-15/30-15 ratio. I'm think the increase of protien and fats may help by energy levels. Any thoughts on this?
    "So long as I can have the sex, and the drugs...I don't really need the rock and roll" -Spinal Tap

  2. #2
    Fat guy on a bike
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    I would cut carbs out entirely, unless you are really keeping a strict calorie balance. The point of low carb diet is to be in ketosis, and any significant carbs will reduce the effectiveness. I suggest you cycle on and off eating carbs, whats called a cyclic ketogenic diet.

    Basically eat no carbs to very little carbs (<20g from veggies and low glycemic index sources) 5 and 1/2 days a week, and eat plenty of carbs on the last day with a cheat meal the evening before. This way you can maintain a good muscle energy level and the breaks help liven up your diet.

    I lose weight consistently on this type of diet and have noticed no negatives to my energy. I am more level and consistent in almost every way on low carb.

    The hardest part for me is eating no carbs all the damned time. One gets tired of meat, cheese, and veggies all day.

  3. #3
    Zip
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    Thanks Mordy !!
    "So long as I can have the sex, and the drugs...I don't really need the rock and roll" -Spinal Tap

  4. #4
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
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    For me, what works best (so far proven this year with an almost 40# weight loss) is more accurately characterized as a smart-carb diet. :P

    Next to no, but not nil, carbs at dinner. Dinner mostly fresh veggies (salad with no dressing, steamed, whatever) with 6-8oz lean protein. Carbs consumed are very high quality and high fiber stuff. Like Ak Mak crackers for example.

    Lunch is a little more free with carbs, but not absolutely free, and still high quality as I can get. Sometimes this isn't great as i'm out with friends or whatever. There have been a number of the salads at Wendy's and Chik Fil A that happen here.

    Breakfast is high fiber / high protein cereal with almond-milk usually. But if I have a honey-bran muffin at the coffee shop also, when I get my non-fat latte, that's okay. I also try to get some kind of lean protein. Hard for me, as I hate eggs, which is what works for my wife.

    If i'm going biking - like starting 9-10am, or a race, or whatever, then I "load up" at breakfast and instead of the cereal/muffin I'll have a wheat bagel with chunky peanut butter on it, or similar.

    I have noticed it dramatically important to eat small and regularly during rides though. People have started to talk too. Pretty much any time a group ride is stopping, i'm having a nibble. On a long endurance ride I did two weeks ago (107m road) I was eating about 1/2 a clif bar every 30-45 minutes. If I don't do this eating pattern, I bonk.

    disclaimer: I'm not a nutritionist or health professional, I've just had some good luck this year. This is just my 2c.

  5. #5
    LCI #1853
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    Depends on how serious a cyclist you are... e.g., how much riding you do, and/or how much riding fits into your weight loss plan.

    The Atkins and other low-carb diets don't work well for cyclists. Carbohydrate is the chief source of fuel for your body because it it easily transformed into glucose and glycogen, simple sugars that can quickly be used by muscles. You also use fat for energy (which is what the Atkins program works to drive you into), but its a much less efficient fuel. Protein can be used for energy when your other supplies are severely depleted, but your body mainly uses it to rebuild muscle tissue. And, in fact, in the first few days of Atkins, you catabolize skeletal muscle for fuel while the body gears up to get ketosis underway.

    If you're serious about biking (that is, more than hitting the trails occasionally), your diet should be mostly carbohydrate somewhere between 60 and 70 percent. About 20 to 30 percent of your total calories should come from fat, about 10 to 15 percent from protein. Control your weight by balancing how much you ride with how much you eat. Chris Carmichael's 2004 book, Food for Fitness is a good resource for fueling your rides while still taking excess weight off the rider...

  6. #6
    CEO Product Failure
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    My $.02, need to lose weight and maintain your strength, cut carbs out (as much as you can--definitely eliminate pasta, bread, rice, beer etc.) and eat 5-6 times a day in 2.5-3 hr intervals. Eat whatever you can fit in a coffee cup. By the 3 or 4th day, your stomach will shrink to the size of that coffee cup, so even if you try to cheat and over eat, you stomach is still small and you fill up quicker. Stay away from pork products, eat plenty of fish, eggs, chicken, brocolli, cauliflower, yellow & zucchini squash, soups (can of cambells) is a great meal to--so is baby food. Drink 30-60 oz of water throughout the day. The first week you should have no problem dropping 8-11 lbs if you stay true to this plan.

    I've used this as do many others at my club. If you need to make weight and have a few weeks to do so, this beats going to the sauna and dehydrating yourself.

  7. #7
    Zip
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    Thank You to everyone! I got some good info here..
    "So long as I can have the sex, and the drugs...I don't really need the rock and roll" -Spinal Tap

  8. #8
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    What Pscylepath said.

    Also, to loose weight, you need to do longer lower intensity rides. This does more than just drain your blood sugar. It allows fat to start being converted to sugars (which is a relatively slow chemical process), put in your blood, and burned. If you do short high intensity workouts you risk getting really hungry/tired, converting little fat, and eating so much to replenish your energy levels that you don't loose weight.

    If you find yourself bonking then an energy gel is appropriate if it keeps you moving- i.e. a hundred calorie energy gel can keep you moving to burn 150 calories of fat for a net loss of 50 calories. Hammer products use more than simple sugars in their energy gels. I also like their recovery drink and use it after rides I know will otherwise cause me to go into 'hibernation' mode.
    To the troll mobile, away...

  9. #9
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    I told I was a diabetic last spring, I have been on a low sugar, low carb diet for about 8 months, the first 1 1/2 to 2 week I felt like was going through some sort of withdrawals, which I was, from sugar, then I started to feel great. I've lost 35lbs (255 down to 220)and kept it off all because of diet, it has not been real hard.
    The experts say the diabetic diet is the healthiest. I'm sold on it, and i have to be.
    So what I do now is walk a fine line, carbs and sugars only when I ride stay away from them when I don't. You have to be aware of what your body is telling you and don't let your sugar get to low that is bad.
    Anyway i hope this gives you something to think about.

  10. #10
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    Hey, I went from 247 to 227 in about 6 weeks. I cut my carb intake except for ride days which i did some carbs but reduced my portion size, ate a lot of meat, egg whites, salads and eliminated sugar snacking except for Wednedays and saturdays. I feel great, my back doesn't hurt after a long ride, my knees are great, and I've been knocking up to 3 minutes off PR's. If you want to loose weight--no matter what you eat you still have to burn more than you consume. I read an article in bicycling magazine that any handful of anything is about 200 calories--which really put things into perspective. Pecans are 50 calories per nut! I did start looking at caloric intake and that really helped a lot.
    Big bike blessings to you!

  11. #11
    Trying a little
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    I just cut them all out, no bread, booze, rice, pasta. For about a year. Rode hard 4 times a week about 12 hours riding per week. Lost 80lbs. Started eating bread again and beers, quit riding so much, gained back 20lbs. Co-incidence???

    I never apologize. I'm sorry, but that's just the way I am.

  12. #12
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    And you can spend too much time trying to come up with a magic ratio. If you're going to have any kind of balanced diet, and not do something like Atkins [which I just can't believe is good for you], then the main goal is to cut calories, and the easiest calories to cut are fat calories because they pack the densest energy.
    To the troll mobile, away...

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