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  1. #1
    Team Cspine
    Reputation: bulletbob's Avatar
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    Clydes and carbon?

    Buenos dios ya'll,

    I was rethinking the whole 'go big and heavy' thing and maybe putting some carbon parts on the Kona but had visions of snapping a handlebar on my way down Keystone or Winter Park.

    **shiver**

    I searched (no really) and found a lively thread from late last summer that was pretty thorough on the subject so I guess I'm curious if anyone has blown up any carbon parts lately? Any specific brands or parts to stay AWAY from?

    I'm still kind of queasy about Clyde and carbon on the same bike!
    Sorry what?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ro.nin's Avatar
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    Glad

    Glad you asked;

    Building up a Reign (custom) and at first I got a Race Face Deus handlebar.

    Then I start drooling while looking at carbon bars...
    Went to almost every bike shop in town and asked them the same question:
    "Dude, look at me. I'm 6'3", 205lbs, and ride aggro XC. "Aggro" mostly cuz of my weight... I don't do funny stuff; no hucks, drops more than 3 feet etc. Can I use a carbon handlebar? Won't it snap on me?"

    I can see carbon splinters flying around me and me looking down at the funny tooth mark in my stem...

    Everyone told me no worries though. I didn't quite believe them... till one of them got scientifical on my a$$. If you applied the torsion forces necessary to break a carbon bar to an Aluminum one, you would already be at the second knot around your stem...

    PLUS.

    And this is a big psychological plus. Yes, carbon bars break. Extremely rarely though. More rarely than aluminum. BUT. It's waaaay more dramatic when they break.

    Please excuse the analogy - but it's like a plane crash. Cancer, poverty, heart disease kill millions of people every year... and it's "kinda normal". One plane crashes, with 150 people on board, and every TV station on the planet talks about it. There's some statistics that says that you're more likely to die on your drive to the airport than on your flight, by ten times or something like that.

    Your aluminum bar is more likely to bend without you noticing and become a hazard than your carbon bars to break - by many times.

    Long story short - I sold my Deus on Sunday, I'll get my new FSA K-Force 31.8 in the mail, probably today.

    Oh, and if it breaks... well, c'est la vie.

    Bling!
    Quote Originally Posted by Khemical
    wizzler is a must. although then it consumes all your waking and sleeping thoughts until you can return.

  3. #3
    Sumo-Clydedale
    Reputation: RussBackman's Avatar
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    If the carbon bars are made correctly, there is no way you can brake them through ordinary riding. I play around with race cars. The top end open wheel cars build suspension control arms and other components out of carbon which are often thinner than bike bars and subject significantly more forces.

    As the previous post stated, if you can break a good carbon bar, you have other issues to worry about. Once of the nice benefits of carbon bars them seem to do much better job of absorbing road shock then metal bars. I currently using the Easton Monkey Lites. Nice bars, love' em.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
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    I use Syncros "Gain" carbon bars and am extremely happy with them. I'm 235 with a 6" travel bike.

  5. #5
    Team Cspine
    Reputation: bulletbob's Avatar
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    Excellent boys!

    Thanks for the replies!

    I'm not sure I'll dropping the bill and a quarter for that FSA right away but I'll definitely put it on the list of goodies to buy in the near future.

    I did notice, however, any thoughts on snapping a seatpost were conspicuously absent... Maybe the visual was too much to handle?

    When I get my new Kona sized shortly with the video fit system, I'm sure I'll be replacing some parts with carbon.

    All parts duly noted and bookmarked as well, the check is in the mail.

    Thanks!
    Sorry what?

  6. #6
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    Carbon? I hear you.

    I don't have carbon bars now, but I have read about the strength of carbon and have broken two Alluminum bars. My experience with other carbon components is more about flex than breaking. With a bar though, that may not be much of an issue.

    Good luck,

    Ken.

  7. #7
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    I'm 6'2" and currently 235, my Trek FuelEx8 has Bontrager carbon bars. I haven't had any problems with them yet, nor do I expect to. The only situation that I could see you getting your self into trouble with carbon components, are when they have been designed to be super light (ie super expensive race stuff), sacrificing strength in the name of saving weight. This may be more of a road bike thing though.

  8. #8
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    They still have old stock of Easton EC70s for $60 at PricePoint. I've been running these for quiet a while now and they are great. I too was concerned at first but more experienced riders in the local club assured me that I'd be fine. I'm 260 at the moment and am primarily a technical trails rider. I don't do big drops but the bars still get a substantial load thrown at them.

    The thing about carbon is that it doesn't weaken from stress over time like steel and aluminum do. Sure if it gets damaged in some way, then you have a problem. For handle bars, the key is to just make sure that your stem clamp and all controls have no burs on them. Also, if you are going to use a 4-bolt stem, you must make sure that the clamp is properly torqued equally on all 4 bolts. Failing to do so will lead to uneven pressure on the bar increasing the potential for failure. Carbon bar manufacturers recommend 2-bolt stems rather than 4-bolt but if you do it right, 4-bolt won't be a problem. And hey...who's going to use anything other than a Thomson anyway???

    The primary reason I went with carbon was for vibrasion damping. Carbon bars are far less harsh than aluminum. I wouldn't drop $100+ for carbon bars but when you can get Easton carbon for $60, then it's almost a no brainer. Heck you can pay close to that for good aluminum bars.

  9. #9
    long standing member
    Reputation: PCinSC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bulletbob
    ...I guess I'm curious if anyone has blown up any carbon parts lately? Any specific brands or parts to stay AWAY from?

    I've read the posts in this thread, with some the guys using carbon parts with no issues. And I want to believe that it's strong enough. And I want to trust the manufacturer's are designing products well and building them properly. But then I read a post like this one and I say to myself, "I'm just gonna stick with Aluminum."


    Quote Originally Posted by bulletbob
    I'm still kind of queasy about Clyde and carbon on the same bike!
    My point exactly. To each his own, I guess.

    Patrick

  10. #10
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    Im currently 260lbs and ride an all rigid Seven on technical trails. Handlebar is Azonic XC Carbon.

    Works just fine.

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