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  1. #1
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    A clyde strong rim

    What should i be looking for when it comes to picking rims. I'm building my own wheel set, what companies should i stay away from? Should i go with 32 or 36 holes? does the hub quality matter? Chris King or hayes? dt swiss spokes and nipples? free ride/downhill, or x/c rims? Please help me get on the right track, thanks in advance.
    [SIZE=2]No one can possibly know what is about to happen: it is happening, each time, for the first time, for the only time.
    James A. Baldwin
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  2. #2
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    How heavy are you? What type of riding do you do (and on what type of trails)?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPDu4ea
    How heavy are you? What type of riding do you do (and on what type of trails)?
    270lbs. Ride mainly trails and urban. For now.
    [SIZE=2]No one can possibly know what is about to happen: it is happening, each time, for the first time, for the only time.
    James A. Baldwin
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  4. #4
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    How technical are the trails? Do you go flying through rock gardens at 20+ mph? Do you go off 12" drop-offs? 24"? Larger?

    By urban do you mean you ride around on paved bike paths, or do you go bouncing down flights of stairs etc?

  5. #5
    Fat, but working on it...
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    Pick strength over weight. Go with the highest number of holes you can. More holes = more spokes = more strength. I'm running Sun Mammoth rims with King hubs and 14g spokes, and they have no problem holding up to whatever abuse I can throw at them.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPDu4ea
    How technical are the trails? Do you go flying through rock gardens at 20+ mph? Do you go off 12" drop-offs? 24"? Larger?

    By urban do you mean you ride around on paved bike paths, or do you go bouncing down flights of stairs etc?
    flying thru mainly dirt trails w/ logs-roots, rock gardens. Don't do too many drop offs, but none larger than 36". Is salsa gordo considered any good.
    [SIZE=2]No one can possibly know what is about to happen: it is happening, each time, for the first time, for the only time.
    James A. Baldwin
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by IAmCosmo
    Pick strength over weight. Go with the highest number of holes you can. More holes = more spokes = more strength. I'm running Sun Mammoth rims with King hubs and 14g spokes, and they have no problem holding up to whatever abuse I can throw at them.
    its real hard finding an assortment of rim listings for disc brakes, with 36 or more holes.
    [SIZE=2]No one can possibly know what is about to happen: it is happening, each time, for the first time, for the only time.
    James A. Baldwin
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  8. #8
    Are you talking to me?
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    THe Gordo is a good choice.

    Look at the Rhino Lite XL, (welded and machined) also.

    THe most important part is having the wheels built by a good wheelman, and having them checked after the first ride.
    gfy

  9. #9
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    Are there any 48 hole hubs?
    [SIZE=2]No one can possibly know what is about to happen: it is happening, each time, for the first time, for the only time.
    James A. Baldwin
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  10. #10
    Are you talking to me?
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    Why?

    Are you planning on using this wheelset on a tandem?

    Woodman may make 48h hubs, but they are going to be few and far between.
    gfy

  11. #11
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    There are some high spoke count hubs/rims for tandem and touring, but they aren't necessary. I ride about like you and am fine on an XT hub, 14 gauge straight spokes and brass nipples, and a lower-end Mavic rim. The weakest link in that whole setup is the XT hub (which I have to adjust after ~10 rides and which has a sloppy freehub compared to higher-end stuff).

    But that wheel was handbuilt which makes as big of a difference as what parts you pick...

  12. #12
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    I have the DT Swiss 4.1D 32 hole rims and they've held up great compared to the 517's I had before. King ISO hubs & banjo string tension on the 12G spokes makes for a great wheel

  13. #13
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    arrow wheels can take anything you can throw at them.

    http://arrowracing.com/hoops/frx.html

  14. #14
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    Sun Singletrack rims are a super strong lower cost disc rim. I'm 260# riding aggressive XC trails with lots of TTFs. I've shattered the internals of my freehub body on an XT hub into little pieces and broken many spokes (before having them rebuilt with DT Swiss Comp DB spokes) and have yet to get the slightest bend in my 32H rims.

    I now have a new custom built set with Mavic XM819s and Hope Pro2 hubs on the way. Can't wait.

  15. #15
    mtbr Buckeye...in Austin
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    Good job!


    A quick search of the forum returned 188 threads on rims....

    Another on DT Swiss 5.1ds came back with 36....


    I like the 5.1d over the 4.1d for the extra width/coverage/strength. I'm never going to ride a 1.8 tire or anything and the 5.1d are BEEFY!!

    Check out this thread

    I love mine!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by UNITH
    flying thru mainly dirt trails w/ logs-roots, rock gardens. Don't do too many drop offs, but none larger than 36". Is salsa gordo considered any good.
    yes the gordo is a great rim. They have handled large drops, jumps and very ruff trails.......itís by far the best upgrade ive done to my bike

  17. #17
    Glad to Be Alive
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    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  18. #18
    NormalNorm
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    Check out the Mavic 819's. First rims that i've never had to true, after 2 years and 4000kms of riding. I weigh 235 and ride them hard. they are also ust(tubeless)compatible. Diffently worth the money....

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrandonJ
    Sun Singletrack rims are a super strong lower cost disc rim. I'm 260# riding aggressive XC trails with lots of TTFs. I've shattered the internals of my freehub body on an XT hub into little pieces and broken many spokes (before having them rebuilt with DT Swiss Comp DB spokes) and have yet to get the slightest bend in my 32H rims.

    I now have a new custom built set with Mavic XM819s and Hope Pro2 hubs on the way. Can't wait.
    x2 . . . . I went through the "what rim to buy" process about 4 months ago and settled on the Sun singletracks. So far they have handled everything my 230 lbs. body can throw at them (stairs, rocky trails, ~1' drop to flat, etc.).

  20. #20
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    I had Universal Cycles build my wheels, (Mavic XM 321/Hope XC) and they listened to me as to what I wanted and could afford. Mike offered me at least four different set ups that would have worked well for me. The price was good and workmanship was excellent. Call or e-mail them, they respond quickly.

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