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  1. #1
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    Clyde pushing 300lbs looking for suggestions under $600.

    I am complete noob to biking and haven't been on a bike since high school, an 88 giant iguana I believe. I have been looking at bikes and I have somewhat narrowed it down but I am concerned due to my weight. I am 6'0 and just about 300lbs. Out of the few bikes I have looked at the Trek 4500 has stood out, but I have only been on a very quick test ride on the 4500, a 2005 Fischer Marlin now sold, and a Fischer Wahoo. The 4500 has been the best fit but before I take the leap I am wondering if I will have problems with the bike due to my weight. This shop only deals in Fischer and Trek, but there is another shop, not so friendly, that carries Specialized and Raliegh and another one that carries Giant, GT and Schwinn.

    The one shop is also supposed to be getting in a 4900 to give a test ride also and possibly a Fischer Piranha.

    I would like to stay under $500 not including tax if possible, but if I must I can go $600-700. I figure for my first bike I would rather start off on the cheaper side.

  2. #2
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    I am not sure how 'clyde' worthy they are, but my friend just ordered a Woodstock 505. He had the same price range as you and it will be his first real bike. For that money the Woodstock is hands down the best deal (at least component wise). It should get here tomorrow or the next day. I try to post letting you know what I think of it.
    The Revolution will not be motorized...especially at $5 per gallon.

  3. #3
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    Well, hope this helps some. I am 280-285 and I have a 4500. The bike shop recommended it to me for my price range and said that my weight would only be a real problem with the judy shock. So far the bike has held up really well with me and has taken the abuse that I have given it. I think the frame of the 4500 is the most solid of all the bikes I test rode, except for the hardrock. Hope this helps. If you have any questions just ask and I will let you know more of my experience. Oh, about forgot the wheels are not that bad, but will not last that long. I have to get mine trued every couple of weeks.

  4. #4
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    Thanks that is good to know. One of the advantages to the shop that has the 4500 is they are open till 8 and will be within easy riding distance so if I do have any problems.

  5. #5
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    First, Woodstock looks good, but the fork will not hold up. Its not known to be a great fork anywho.

    Second, like was said, the fork or wheels will probably be the biggest issue. Frame should be ok. Wheels: deore hubs, rhyno lite rims =90 bucks, down the road if needed. Fork = however much you can afford at the time. Just realize that you will be replacing parts more often due to the stress, and dont worry about it. Save 10-15 bucks a week, and when something needs replacing, you will have cash. If it all stays togethor for a year, at the end of it you will have 500-700 saved, and can put it toward upgrades, or a new bike.

    If I were you I would really consider saving a little bit more, and getting something like this:http://konaworld.com/shopping_cart/F...0&parentid=253
    or
    http://www.harobikes.com/2005/mtb/escape-83.php

    The Hoss you may find at clearance, same for the Escape. both are the companies "big hit for big guys" bike. my buddy(150 or 160) rides an escape, and I picked one up a couple weeks ago, at well under retail. They are desigend for big guys, and unlike the Trek, you wont have to worry as much about fork or wheels. Good luck with whatever you decide

    Matt

  6. #6
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    My forst recommendation to would be to save some more money and get a higher end bike from the get go. In the long run you will end up spending less.

    I know the fork on the Woodstock is crap but on any bike in the $600 price range you will get crap. I haven't checked the specs on the other bikes mentioned but when I was shopping with my buddy the forks were all bad at the price range. So I wouldn't write the Woodstock off just because of the fork, the other parts are pretty solid.

    Speaking of trek, I used to ride a Trek 8000 for about 3 yrs and I wieghed 270. The frame held up great, I was surprised because I had previuosly broke a Cannondale and Specialized frame. The wheels suck, Bontrager race wheel with reduced spokes, I had to replace those b/c I kept braking spokes.

    Another thing to consider at your weight is cranks. I have broken cheap cranks just ridng off a curb on my ex-girlfriends Raliegh, the arm literally snapped in two. I won't even ride my present g/f's bike b/c its a XC rig. And make sure you kept the crank arms tight, any place between crank arms and BB will strip out the splines (I guess this goes for anyone, not just clydes, but with the added stress from clydes its more important) and you'll quickly have to replace them.

    Really what the buying should do is look for a used bike. I don't know what type of riding you are trying to do with this bike but at 300 lbs even street riding is going to be hard on the bike and any inferior parts will break. Look for a used $1000-1200 bike that you can get on the cheap. And remember Freeride/Downhill components are your friends.
    The Revolution will not be motorized...especially at $5 per gallon.

  7. #7
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    I will second being a used bike, but only if you know a little about maintenance or you are not afraid to learn. I have had plenty of dept. bikes before I got my Schwinn Woodlands (old). So I knew a little about maintenance, but I chose to buy new because the shop I bought from gives one year of free tune-ups and said that their philosophy is if it's not busy they will walk me through the maintenance process and teach me to do it all myself. So far they have been great in teaching me the proper way to do maintenance. Also buying new will get you some deals on other eqiupment that is needed. I personally recieved 15-20% off all equipment when I bought my bike and everytime I go in i get at least 5-10% off. Just some pros and cons of buying used and new. The lbs i bought from didnt offer the tune-ups with a used bike. Also remember that if your frame is to break on a used bike you do not get a warranty and most frames are lifetime. Just a little more on your plate. Sorry to make the decision a little more difficult for you, or maybe it has made it easier. The only great advice I can give is: No matter what you buy, find a shop that is friendly and that you feel comfortable in. Everything else will work itself out.

  8. #8
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    I will check on the used bikes but most of the shops around here seem fairly small and I haven't noticed any while looking around. I don't mind learning about maintenance and it is something I plan on doing anyway.

    It turns out they won't be getting in the 4900 or the Piranha anytime soon and their other store doesn't have one in. They are offering a Fischer Tassajara with 10% which they say will come close to the price of the Piranha which was 649.99. I believe they have the model in now so I plan on going for a test ride tonight if I have enough time.

    Riding for now will most likely be pretty much road until I get comfortable enough to ride some of the packed trails around here. I could go up in price if need be but I could also just as easily pick up a cheaper bike now just to see if I ride often enough to warrant an upgrade. If an upgrade was needed I would have no problem putting down the cash for a nicer bike. I realize that may actually be more expensive but I just want to make sure I will indeed ride often enough to warrant dropping 700+ on a bike. I compare it somewhat to buying a new car for when you are first learning to drive. I am really bad with buyers remorse which in some sense is a good thing since I tend to research things to death before buying, but at the same time I would probably be kicking myself for spending more than I had to just to get a feel.

  9. #9
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    I just bought a 2006 Raleigh Mojave 8.0. I know Raleigh isn't well regarded but I have been very impressed. I have had it for a couple of weeks. I weigh in at about 290. I got it for about $540 at my local LBS. It has all Deore 9 speed with a LX rear der. and has Hayes MX-2 disc brakes. It does have cheaper hubs with with Alex Dm-21 rims but they seem to be holding up. I figure I can always go the Rhyno route if I need to. The bike looks awesome and rides well. It is very stiff and I have felt no flex with it. It has the Manitou trace fork which I have ordered the extra firm spring kit for. Should be here this week. I hope to write a full review and post some pictures this weekend.

  10. #10
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    It actually turns out I may be able to go up to $1000. Are there any other bikes you all would recommend or am I better off staying with the 4500 as a beginner bike.

    I did go in for a test ride to compare the 4500 to the Tassajara and I really didn't notice a big difference. The employee mentioned when I was on the 4500 the fork looked compressed to almost 50% while I was riding but this wasn't the salesman I had dealt with before since he was off today. I get the feeling somewhat this employee is trying to upsell me a little bit but I maybe wrong. Since I didn't notice a real difference plus I didnt care for the paint job on the tassajara, would I notice any difference spending a little bit more? I realize also test riding on the street I won't notice much of a difference.

    The LBS only carries Kona which most of what they have are FS, Trek, and Fischer if that helps narrow it down.

  11. #11
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    I'm over 300#. My wife got me a 25" Trek 7200 for Christmas. The only thing I replaced was the springy seatpost, all other components are stock. I have put about 400 street miles on it thus far with no problems. I believe the bike cost under $500.00

    http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/citybike/7200.jsp

  12. #12
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    I went above my limit and I bought my new bike. I was a little worried since it happened to be a bike I hadn't done any research on, but all reviews seem to be positive. I ended up picking up the Gary Fischer Cobia for $809+tax.

  13. #13
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    I am looking for a bike for a freind that weights 336 LBS. I found a 05 Haro X2 on clerance
    for 745.00 and a x3 for 1,000 you may want to check them out it looks like a good deal . The bike looks like it can take a clyds weight with no problems. :

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