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  1. #1
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    Clyde needs tires

    I'm try'n to avoid pinched flats (or any flats for that matter) & think'n about try some Specialized Armadillos.

    Whats would be some other choices to look at ??

    Or...what tires are you ride'n on & how are they work'n out for you ??

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Bike Whisperer's Avatar
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    What size of wheels?
    What kind of terrain?
    How big are you?
    Former bicycle mechanic for 8 years, current soil scientist.

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  3. #3
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    Wheels are typical factory 26in wheels .
    Terrain will vary, paved,logging roads, fire trails, nothing extreme.
    How big...to big, 330 lbs.

  4. #4
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    What wheel are you getting flats on?

    What are you doing when you get flats?

    When I did a lot of DH I used a pinch flat resistant tire with thick sidewalls. Was a ***** to get on and off but it sure did the trick for my weight and doing that kind of riding.

    I do more road riding now, and switched tires to the Kenda Kiniptions which are more of a slick for getting great speed. I got a flat on the rear tire and took it to my LBS to look at the situation, and it turns out installing some good quality rim tape is all it took for me to stay flat free for a year and counting.

  5. #5
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    Use thicker tubes and increase tire pressure for pinch flats. Armadillo tires will not really reduce pinch flats. Maxxis Welter Weight tubes are a good compromise between standard tubes and DH tubes.
    Former bicycle mechanic for 8 years, current soil scientist.

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  6. #6
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    Thanks for the input gents, maybe I'll try the tubes before take'n the plunge for a set of $65 tires & if that dont work then I'll try both.

    maybe I'll get some wooden wagon wheels.

  7. #7
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    Go tubeless my big boned friend. Get the Stans rim strips, goo (sealant) and tires and run pinch flat free. Switched this spring and have had no flats all season. Ridden in Moab, Copper Mtn to Breckenridge, Pikes Peak Downhill, Jones Downhill, Pueblo Reservoir and plenty of other rides in rocks, roots and even goat head stickers without a flat to delay a ride. Added some additional sealant mid August and have to top off the air occationally but nothing more than that.

  8. #8
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    Go with cdaler. Go tubeless and don't look back. After hitting a square edge slab rock at speed going downhill and double pinch-flatted 5-6 years ago (a scary experience), and pinch flatting regularly, I came to the conclusion to change my wheel set-up. I went UST and pinch flatting hasn't been a concern for me since. I tried converting non-Ust tires with limited success. At 6'5" 230 and an aggressive XC rider, I have great success staying w/ UST or tubeless ready tires in the rear. No worries. I have one tube for back-up that I have used a few times the last three years or so.

  9. #9
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    going tubeless is a $600 investment, putting proper amount of air in tires is free. this one is a no brainer

  10. #10
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    "Proper amount of air" with tubed tires doesn't exist for a clyde who rides in chunky terrain. I used to pinch flat frequently; I thought it was just the way it was. Been tubeless for 6 years and I don't even think about pinch flats, how many spare tubes I have, or what patch kit works best, or even if I could patch 2 holes with 1 patch. For peace of mind, and , on the flip side, confidence in your tires, Clydes should go tubeless.

  11. #11
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    Stans rim stip sale

    Hey Speedgoat has Stans Freeride rim strips on sale for $9

    Freeride - Will fit most 27mm to 34mm wide rims, including: Rhyno Lite XL, Single wide, Single Track, Salsa Gordo, Alex DM24, and Supra D. Downhill

  12. #12
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    With the terrain your riding, put air in the tires and go. I've ridden on 60 TPI tires and 120 TPI tires anything from 1.95 to 2.10. I have NEVER got a flat, ever, on a mountain bike. I generally stay within 10 pounds of top pressure in the rear and 15 in the front. (Example 50 psi tires - 35 pounds front 40 pounds rear when trail riding. When I ride my mountain bike on the roads, it is pretty much full tire pressure for reduced rolling resistance.)

    Thicker tubes would be the next option if, and only if, you are killing tubes now.

    BTW, I was riding at about 300 and am now down to about 280...never a flat but I ride no chunk rock and there are no thorns to speak of around here either (Northeastern WI & South and Central Upper Peninsula of Michigan)
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

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