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  1. #1
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    Clyde Forks - 9mm QR or 15mm TA/QR

    So I'm 5'9 250lbs, which qualifies me as a real clyde. I tend to ride XC and a bit of AM (no real steep drops, but technical downhills and minor drops). To be more specific, I live in the Socal area and do the following trails:
    Sullivan Canyon
    Aliso Woods - Rock it.
    El Moro - Rattlesnake.

    I have already upgraded my fork to a Rockshox Tora 318 Solo Air at the mass support of this board on clydes and forks. I've been on this fork for about 9 months, but I still feel a bit unstable on the fork on some higher speed downhills. Feels like I'm getting a lot of rattling or flex. I am continuing to try to tune the fork, but I'm thinking maybe it's time to jump to a thru axle. I'm looking at the Fox F100 RLC 100mm fork with a 15mm QR thru axle.

    What are your thoughts?
    Anyone using this fork for similar riding?
    Is it worth the money swapping a 9 month old $200 fork with a new $700 fox fork?
    Should I be worried that the Fox F100 is a full 1.3+ lbs lighter than the Tora 318? Usually, light weight weenie parts = bad for clydes.

    Thanks for your opinions!

  2. #2
    29 some of the time...
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    I am a bit surprised that you have narrowed your flex/vibration issue down to the fork. The tora forks are actually a stiffer chassis than the higher end forks due to their steel stanchions/steerer. Have you considered that the stability issue could be attributed to other components? High speed shudder/flex could be coming from the wheel, the frame, handle bars, or the stem. Even the tire, if too light weight, could attribute to some instability. Out of all of the things that flex/wobble while riding, I personally find the fork flex to be about the least perceptible.

    Without more details on your bike setup and personal build it is total speculation to say that a new fork will cure what ails you
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the reply. It is interesting that you bring up other components. I only think it the fork since adjusting the rebound and pressure exacerbates the problem. My full setup is as follows:

    Santa Cruz Superlight '08, Fox RP3
    2008 Rockshox Tora 318 Solo Air
    Kenda Nevegal 2.0" front tire
    Hope Pro II hubs laced to Mavic EN521
    Raceface deus XC stem
    Truvativ Handlebar (Stylo, i think?)

    I am running my stem a bit high on the steerer tube, since I have lower back issues. I didn't think to add this to my original post.

  4. #4
    56-year-old teenager
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    My experience with a through-bolt 9mm "quick release" has been really positive. Try swapping the front wheel for something with a through-bolt.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  5. #5
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    I've owned a tora, and ridden a qr15 float for ~50 miles, and i'd say the tora is stiffer. A tora with a bolt-on is really quite stiff. First thing to look at when you think you have fork flex issues is to look at tire pressure. Low spoke tension also feels kinda wierd.

    On your build i think the fork is the stiffest component.
    .

  6. #6
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    Hmmm, seems like it's not my fork causing my instability. I'll stick with the Tora for now. So what is this bolt on? Aren't standard QR axles 9mm? Is it as simple as buying two nuts that bolt to the ends of the skewer? I know my Hope Pro II has caps that can be switched to handle QR, 12, 15, or 20mm thru axles, but i don't remember seeing options for a 9mm bolt thru.

  7. #7
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    DT Swiss has them, also Hadley, don't know about Hope.

    My Chumba XCL came with "house brand" wheels - the hubs are something from Kore which came with 20mm thru axle adapters and a 9mm "quick release" that is really a thru-bolt. Likewise the rear has a 10mm thru-bolt. They fit standard dropouts and they're stiff as you'd want.
    Work is the curse of the biking classes.

  8. #8
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    If you are building up a new bike go ahead and get the 15mm, but I wouldn't spend $700+ to replace a perfectly functional 9mm axle fork unless you are doing a lot of really steep, fast and rough DH riding. Remember, the 9mm has been the industry standard for many years (still is in reality). I doubt you'll notice the difference unless you're a really skilled rider. Like others have already posted, I'd concentrate more on fork setup and wheel maintenance than anything else. You'd be amazed at the difference between a properly setup fork and a poorly setup one.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for all the tips. It reiterates that the error lies between handlebars and saddle.

    I'll continue to tweak my suspension setup. I only really have air pressure, rebound, and motion control, but I'm assuming I should be keeping the motion control completely open on downhills. I don't do anything near DH levels, but I do enjoy descending down a mountain.

    I did more research on the 9mm bolt throughs. Seems like there's a big difference between a 9mm QR and a 9mm bolt through, though there are Hope Pro II caps that can be used with the DT Swiss RWS 9mm bolt through axle. That is my new setup in a few weeks (when parts arrive).

  10. #10
    some know me as mongo
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    to be honest you can't blame the fork here. its stiff as anyother xc fork on the market if not stiffer. one thing to keep in mind that you are riding a really light/known to flex frame. granted the superlight is a very nice frame and i have considered them in the past for myself.

    the 15mm axle in my mind is pretty bunk. 9mm bolt on is kinda as well. a good QR (read shimano) will be able to hold the wheel very securely. it might have to do with the QR that you are running. i have had problems with even expensive QR's (hope) holding my wheel tight enough. just a thought for you.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by roaringpanda
    Thanks for the reply. It is interesting that you bring up other components. I only think it the fork since adjusting the rebound and pressure exacerbates the problem. My full setup is as follows:

    Santa Cruz Superlight '08, Fox RP3
    2008 Rockshox Tora 318 Solo Air
    Kenda Nevegal 2.0" front tire
    Hope Pro II hubs laced to Mavic EN521
    Raceface deus XC stem
    Truvativ Handlebar (Stylo, i think?)

    I am running my stem a bit high on the steerer tube, since I have lower back issues. I didn't think to add this to my original post.
    Okay, so the fork and the front rim are both on the stiff end of the spectrum. That tire is fine provided you are running over 35psi in it. SC Superlight frames are flexy under big guys. So you could actually be feeling a bit of waggle in the front end of the frame. I had a Litespeed Ti frame that would get a scary oscillation at over 30mph on pavement as the whole front triangle flexed and let the fork move side-side. The stem and bars are also on the light and flexy end of things.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

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