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  1. #1
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    Clipless pedal advice for n00b

    I weigh 300lbs. and I am about to embark on some clipless pedals for my Giant XTC 29er.

    I was thinking something that was more stable with the wider platform would be better.

    Here are the two models I'm considering. Advice? Pros/cons?

  2. #2
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    I assume you attached pics to show the two options, can't see em from work but I'll add my two cents. I'm 300+ and had good luck with both Shimano M520 pedals and Time Atac Alium pedals. Started with Shimano's then switched to Times. Times have a bigger platform, engange more solidly, and are very tough. I pedal strike a lot, and they have taken a beating.

    I started with Shimano's due to the tension adjustment which is nice when you start learning clipless. You can set it loose enough that you can pull your foot strait up in a panic bail. I'd start with a set of 520's and go from there. Good luck.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sasquatch1413 View Post
    I assume you attached pics to show the two options, can't see em from work but I'll add my two cents. I'm 300+ and had good luck with both Shimano M520 pedals and Time Atac Alium pedals. Started with Shimano's then switched to Times. Times have a bigger platform, engange more solidly, and are very tough. I pedal strike a lot, and they have taken a beating.

    I started with Shimano's due to the tension adjustment which is nice when you start learning clipless. You can set it loose enough that you can pull your foot strait up in a panic bail. I'd start with a set of 520's and go from there. Good luck.
    Sorry, the models in questions are these:

    Shimano PD-M785

    Crank Brothers Mallet 2

  4. #4
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    Based on the tension adjustment, I think I'll stick with Shimano. Seems like that might be best for a first timer.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aquayonex View Post
    Based on the tension adjustment, I think I'll stick with Shimano. Seems like that might be best for a first timer.
    based on the CB pedals being utter garbage, I'd recommend the same. I had one fail after one wet ride.

    In general, I've found big platforms like the mallet to be not as good an idea as they look. They are good for riding in non-clip shoes, but not so good for riding unclipped, wearing your cleated shoes.

    Time Aliums are worth checking out too.
    Time ROC ATAC Clipless Pedal at Price Point

  6. #6
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    When riding clipless with the proper shoes the whole shoe in essence becomes a big platform. I am a big guy and ride on Time ATAC Aliums and never have I felt that I didn't have enough pedal under my feet. They are built like tanks and will take a ton of abuse.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

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    I use the shimanos you speak of......they are great. I will recomend you get the multi release cleats too. Keep them loose till you get used to them...you will know when its time to tighten them. I would go about 3 clicks at a time.

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    I use crank brothers candy pedals with Shimano shoes size 14. They seem to hold up well.

  9. #9
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    Hey....as been mentioned. A good entry level clipless pedal is the Time Alium. I love those pedals, however, have upgraded since to a different Time pedal.

    Also the price of the Time Aliums are great. Search around and you'll find them at a great price. Or if you are will to spend a little more check out the Time Atac X Roc....I use them and will stock up on these for future bikes. Good luck!
    PHX, AZ MTBDOC MTB Customs and Repairs

  10. #10
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    I agree that the Time stuff is great. I am also rocking a set of ATAC XS CARBON pedals and they are fantastic as well.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  11. #11
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    been using SPD's since the mid/late 90's... also ran ritchey/wellgo knock offs from nashbar (also use standard SPD cleat) i've been as high as 335# and never had an issue with SPD's

    i've wanted to try TIME atac's but i've got multiple bikes that all run SPD and 1 pair of shoes so I can't justify that.

    for crank bro... I'm weary... seen more then 1 snap under mini clyds (205ish lb guys)

    but if I was in a heavy mud/clay area that was clogging up my SPD's I'd look at another option

    in the end SPD's are so universal i'll keep em around
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  12. #12
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    As a clyde myself who is pretty new to mountain biking I thought I'd share some observations on SPD clips:

    I use them on my road bike so I thought I could transition to mountain biking no problem - I may have over estimated my abilities a bit :P

    - Be prepared to fall over a few of times. I was out riding a trail that was a bit harder than I probably should have been riding and fell over 3 times when I got stopped unexpectedly or lost momentum and couldn't react in time to save it . There's ust a lot of reasons that you have to stop quickly while mountain bikign and remembering to unclip whenever you get in a precarious balance situation takes some practice. Just a couple of burises, but be warned that the transition is not a painless one. I'm thinking elbow pads may be prudent for a while.

    - They definately help me stay connected to the bike when I'm bouncing arround and help on the uphills

    - On a related note, be careful about keeping a cell phone in your pocket when crossing creeks Ziploc bags are handy

    - Mud was not really the issue I was afraid that it may be. Even after pushing through some pretty slimy stuff I was able to click in OK.

    - Picking the right shoes is really important. Make sure they are stiff to reduce foot strain. Screw in cleats can be really helpful on vey steep, muddy trails. If you have alignment issues, inserts to adjust your foot angle can help a lot too.

    Let us know how it goes for you!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wryknow View Post
    As a clyde myself who is pretty new to mountain biking I thought I'd share some observations on SPD clips:

    I use them on my road bike so I thought I could transition to mountain biking no problem - I may have over estimated my abilities a bit :P

    - Be prepared to fall over a few of times. I was out riding a trail that was a bit harder than I probably should have been riding and fell over 3 times when I got stopped unexpectedly or lost momentum and couldn't react in time to save it . There's ust a lot of reasons that you have to stop quickly while mountain bikign and remembering to unclip whenever you get in a precarious balance situation takes some practice. Just a couple of burises, but be warned that the transition is not a painless one. I'm thinking elbow pads may be prudent for a while.

    - They definately help me stay connected to the bike when I'm bouncing arround and help on the uphills

    - On a related note, be careful about keeping a cell phone in your pocket when crossing creeks Ziploc bags are handy

    - Mud was not really the issue I was afraid that it may be. Even after pushing through some pretty slimy stuff I was able to click in OK.

    - Picking the right shoes is really important. Make sure they are stiff to reduce foot strain. Screw in cleats can be really helpful on vey steep, muddy trails. If you have alignment issues, inserts to adjust your foot angle can help a lot too.

    Let us know how it goes for you!
    Well I've been at it for over a week now. No falls yet. I did lower the settings quite a bit so maybe that's why? But I really have not had one issue at all. I'm clipping into the Shimano PD-M785 via Lake MX85's and love it! I feel so much safer on the bike and way more in control.

  14. #14
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    I had been riding clipless for over 10 years before I fell with em... if you keep riding it will happen... but it might take a while lol
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  15. #15
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    I love my Time Aliums. Once you're clipped in you really don't notice how small the pedal is. As others have said it feels like the whole sole of the shoe is your platform.

  16. #16
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    been riding SPD's on my road and mountain bikes for years. I'm just now contemplating platforms again for trailriding. SPD's are cheap, plentiful and practically bulletproof. The more you pay, the better they'll be, but even the cheapo's get the job done. For an entry to clipless, I'd buy some cheapo SPD's, set them to the lightest tension and give em a go. Once you've got it down, then you can shop around with a little more experience for what you're looking for as an improvement. It never hurts to have a couple pairs of pedals kicking around for when one goes bad.

  17. #17
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    Your first fall will be either when you are waiting for a light to change at the busiest intersection in town or you ride up into a large group of riders in the midst of a trail side chat fest. Then like the tallest tree in forest; KABOOM. I've done both. And to make matters worse, it'll all be in slow motion.
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  18. #18
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    lol mine was riding with some friends... got up to a rest spot and turned to talk to someone as I was trying to unclip... it didn't happen and tumbled nice and gently to the ground... well as gently as a 300# guy can lol
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  19. #19
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    I have been riding the XT trail pedals and love them. I am 280lbs with size 14 ft.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by beeroose View Post
    your first fall will be either when you are waiting for a light to change at the busiest intersection in town or you ride up into a large group of riders in the midst of a trail side chat fest. Then like the tallest tree in forest; kaboom. I've done both. And to make matters worse, it'll all be in slow motion.
    hahaha!!

  21. #21
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    I would ask one of your riding buddies to see if they have any old clipless pedals, most of my buddies have a few old sets kicking around.. myself i have given 2 sets to new riders... at least that way you can learn on them ... then save up and get some kick ass pedals... doesn't hurt to ask

  22. #22
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    I was looking for something to go both Road and MTB... with low stack height. Went with the BeBops on a whim... have been good so far, but I do not do really aggressive riding as well (I'm 6'3", 275).

    Had SPDs as well (from a friend) and liked them, just wanted to try something different.
    '01 GT Aggressor 2.0
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    Why am I on the computer and not riding???

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aquayonex View Post
    Sorry, the models in questions are these:

    Shimano PD-M785

    Crank Brothers Mallet 2
    Don't waste your money on the XT pedals. Get the M530s for heaps less and only a small weight penalty.

    Fresh Gear: Shimano M530 Trail Pedals

    "And with a listed weight of 455g, they’re only 55 grams heavier than the much more expensive XTR M985 model. Yep- those 55 grams will cost you about $200 more to shed."

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by R+P+K View Post
    Don't waste your money on the XT pedals. Get the M530s for heaps less and only a small weight penalty.

    Fresh Gear: Shimano M530 Trail Pedals

    "And with a listed weight of 455g, they’re only 55 grams heavier than the much more expensive XTR M985 model. Yep- those 55 grams will cost you about $200 more to shed."
    You're a day late and a dollar short my friend. I bought these over a month ago. Love them too. But I only paid $70 for them, so I really don't feel like I overpaid at all.

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