Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: charliethetuna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    126

    Carbon Fork For A Big Fella???

    so my bike should be enroute (ordered a stout from bikesdirect) and i hear alot of horror stories about the front end. thinking one of my first upgrades will be fork and headset. i go around 260 pounds and i'm wondering if a carbon fork will handle my weight. my riding will be split between street, family fun, long island singletrack/mild ups and downs and just basically my everything bike. when i do ride offroad i'm kinda hard on gear.
    watcha think?
    The bicycle is a curious vehicle. Its passenger is its engine.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    422
    Many carbon forks come with a weight limit. At my current 220 I know I'm close to the limit or over for a lot of carbon rigid/road/cross components.

    Check with the manufacturer to see if they have a weight limit or not.

  3. #3
    Underskilled
    Reputation: CaveGiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,111
    I recently did a bike swap with one of my friends, we are both powerful clydes, he goes SS ultralight rigid, I ride a 45lb FS.

    I must admit I was surprised how good the bike was, especially the carbon fork.

    However, it was a bit of fun and I would not want it as my day to day. He however is going to buy a FS.

    You do not need to count grams on your bike if you are a clyde, you are more powerful than a normal guy and should take advantage of that.

    Carbon is nice, but I would recommend getting a suspension fork, preferably a FS frame.

    Ask yourself, really why do you want a rigid? what are pros and cons.
    Then think about how much more you can do with a suspension fork (not to mention reduced stress on your wrists which may come back to haunt you later in life).

    hope this helps
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: charliethetuna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    126
    cave, ther are several reasons not to go with a fs bike, the main being cost. also as this will be my everything bike it will spend quite a bit of time riding with my kids, boardwalk, around town etc...... there are a few choice names we use to describe guys who ride fs on the street. 1. barney. 2. herb. 3. dish washer. 4. day laborer.
    as long island is relatively flat a fs bike is just an unnecessary expense.
    as for the suspension fork, may at some point but right now i'm just gonna get this thing rideable with minimal outlay.
    may just opt for the cro-mo karate monkey fork.
    The bicycle is a curious vehicle. Its passenger is its engine.

  5. #5
    Underskilled
    Reputation: CaveGiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,111
    If you saw how I rode my FS bike on the street you would understand. I may have a total of 13" travel, but i bottom out a few times a ride.

    If cost is a big factor, you can get a lot of comfort with a rigid fork and BIG tyres. I use the big schwalbe big apples, they are good.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    23
    for the price of a good carbon fork that will hold your weight you could get yourself a semi-descent fork that will hold your weight and make your wrists , hands and elbows thank you. if you get something 15mm or 20mm dropout it should be plenty stout to handle anything without worry or groan. i've found it's hard to find springs for heavier weights and have switched to using air forks.

  7. #7
    Underskilled
    Reputation: CaveGiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,111
    +1 on mr clown.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BigVaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    321
    From all the Reviews I've read the Stout sounds like its nice ride.

    What I took away from what I read is that you'll more than likely only have to replace the headset & not the fork. Up to you, but if cost is a issue i'd start there...

    FS bikes aren't for everyone & budget is a big deterrent for a lot of people, myself included.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: charliethetuna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    126
    hey vaz, didnt you just get the stout? what are your impressions so far? i'm probably gonna do the brakes and if i can get away with just the headset at first then great.
    as far as full suspension, my terrain is mostly flat so it shouldnt be an issue and at 47 years old i'm not bombing downhills anymore.
    also, i'm in talks for a gt peace ss frame in green medium and if i get it i'll build it up right and either give my wife the stout or maybe throw gears on it and beat it like it robbed my house.
    The bicycle is a curious vehicle. Its passenger is its engine.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BigVaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    321
    Nope, haven't had any seat time yet... My birthday is next thursday, so thats when I will "officialy" be a Stout owner... lol

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: charliethetuna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    126
    cool. mine should be here about the same time. wednesday or thursday delivery. cant wait.
    The bicycle is a curious vehicle. Its passenger is its engine.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    898
    AFAIK, Niner don't have a weight-limit on their carbon fork. Most of the others do.

  13. #13
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,439
    Hahahaha!! Day Laborer.
    I like turtles

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    533
    Carbon fork on a mountain bike!

    Not for me... Carbon does not fatigue. It's really strong and stiff until... It fails.

    The absolute last thing I want bombing down hill on a technical trail (when the fork is stressed most) is for the fork to fail. Too many helicopter rides are given out at the park behind my house. That for sure would merit a helicopter ride!

    If it's not for trail riding then a mountain bike isn't really needed...

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: aztecracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    9
    I have a carbon fiber Black Ops fork on my 29er redline monocog. I have to say after more that a few spill on the trail, the fork has not given me any troubles. I'm the one that fells bad for putting it through the pain.
    29er go big or go home.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •