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  1. #1
    Weekend Warrior
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    BROKE my frame. What does it mean?

    So I also posted about this in the Bikes and Frames section of the forums and they directed me here. I bought my bike a month ago and I already snapped a part of my frame. See below:
    BROKE my frame. What does it mean?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1308540978.315739.jpg
    BROKE my frame. What does it mean?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1308541012.763145.jpg
    BROKE my frame. What does it mean?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1308541065.327939.jpg
    Now looking at other peoples input, it looks like this is purely because of my weight and size. I am 6'4" and 285lbs. My bike is a 2010 Diamondback Recoil Comp. I'm not in the position to purchase an expensive bike. I thought I was being smart getting this one cause it was the "comp" version which has better parts then the regular Recoil. And I spent $675 on it which is a great deal, but still a lot of money.

    I guess my question here is what am supposed to do? I have a 2 year warranty so I know they will replace or fix it, but then what? It's just gonna break again right? So what do I do? Accept that I'm too big for an affordable bike and just keep breaking frames till my warranty runs out? Or should I try to return it and look for a new option?

    I love biking. It's definitely my passion and I don't want to lose it as both my hobby and a form of exercise. So please everyone, what should I do....? Cause things are looking pretty grim right now

  2. #2
    I Strava Hamburgers
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    It's just gonna break again right?
    Its possible. But unfortunately we can't be sure. It could have been a defect on one bike and the next one could be totally fine for 20 years.

    So what do I do?
    Force them to honor the warranty, and get it fixed
    Accept that I'm too big for an affordable bike and just keep breaking frames till my warranty runs out?
    Get them to fix this bike now, and use it to drop down in weight. You're fine, and its shiatty that this happened, but honestly don't let this plant any seeds. Just get it fixed and ride again.
    Or should I try to return it and look for a new option?
    Up to you, but go with the warranty first. Then continue to ride. If it happens again, it may be the rider and not the bike, but right now, blame your bike.
    My EBB so loud
    I'm mashing...

  3. #3
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    relax man

    Calm down and take a breath. I know having a busted bike sucks. It really does. But, stressing over it isn't productive.

    But, read the previous poster's response it was good. My advice, get it warrentied/fixed (save all the paperwork, take notes if you need to) and ride the snot out of it. IF, and this is is a big IF. IF it busts again, then talk with the manufacturer about a replacement bike for free or severely reduced cost. If the bike design is bad, the company should be willing to work with you.

    IMHO - unless you are using this bike as a jumper - it should be able to handle the weight. Probably a defect in the metal. Pooh-happens.
    I was gonna stop by and see you, but the Jehovas witnesses came by. When they left I started drinking. Voicemail from Paul

  4. #4
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    If you broke the frame after only one month, I'd assume that there was a some kind of hidden defect. If there wasn't and the frame really isn't up to the loads you create, the exchange frame should also fail during the two year warranty.

    Get the frame replaced and see what happens

    Good luck and happy trails.

  5. #5
    Weekend Warrior
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    Thanks guys! These are so much more optimistic responses then I got in the Bikes and Frames forum. We will see what solutions the LBS has to offer, but either way I'm not giving up. I also am looking into a heftier rear shock upgrade cause I believe that if I don't bottom out the suspension I can avoid this happening again.

  6. #6
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    I broke a handlebar that was under warranty. I told them I didn't want to replace it with the same one so they gave me credit towards a higher end handlebar that was stronger and I paid the difference in price. If you're worried about the frame cracking again maybe you can do something similar.

  7. #7
    I Strava Hamburgers
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    Just get someone to tune the rear shock for you so you avoid the issue all together. Upgrading your rear shock would be better spent saved for when you drop down in size pending that's your goal. Then using the saved money you'd have spent on your upgrades, towards a new bike all together!
    My EBB so loud
    I'm mashing...

  8. #8
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    I would send it back to the manufacturer and either get a better frame in return for a nominal fee, or upgrade the shocks like 14Stone said.

    Diamondback is usually pretty good about helping you out when these types of things happen.
    "You know you're a singlespeeder when you really don't care whether others get it or not, so you don't defend or explain it."

  9. #9
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    I agree with others that you should get the frame replaced under warrantee if possible.

    On the other hand, your riding style should be considered before making a final determination on whether or not you should continue to ride that bike. If you are riding XC style, minimal-to-no jumps or drops, then it should be o.k. In contrast, a 4 inch travel bike like that is not intended for a dewd of your heft to take off a bunch of jumps or 4 foot drops. If you ride a lot of jumps and drops you should consider switching to a different frame/bike.

    Keep In mind that the shop owner is likely to question how it broke, because certain types of damage may not be covered under warrantee. To provide an extreme example, if you were repeatedly taking that bike off 8 foot drops to flat, that is outside the intended use of an XC bike, and it would be reasonable for the company to say this fell outside warrantee. Ideally, the bike shop should have asked you about the style of riding you intended and prevented something like that from happening. The point is, bike shops and manufacturers deal with a lot of people who broke their bikes because of misuse, so donít get angry if they start asking you some questions. And, if you honestly see a that you may have played a role in breaking the frame be prepared to compromise, maybe you end up paying something to get a new frame.

    Regarding upgrades, there is something to be said for upgrading your suspension, this could really improve the ride of you bike and, if you are bottoming out the rear hard, could increase the durability of your frame. The least expensive upgrade would be to get the firmer springs your rear shock and fork; problem with this approach is that you might be heavier than the recommended range for the firmest spring. Spring kits are definitely available for the RS Tora, but Iím not sure about the X-fusion. Replacing the suspension elements altogether would make a major improvement in ride, but the parts will lose a lot of their value as soon as you install them (just like used cars). Iíd be cautious about upgrading just one the shock or the fork and doing nothing to the other, this could imbalance the bike.

  10. #10
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    X-fusion offers different suspension kits. The question is however, whether Jowsteen really needs both kits, for fork and shock. It all depends on how the weight is distributed. Find someone who can help you with a proper suspension setup.
    tenbsmith is certainly right about making sure that you got the right bike for your riding style. If your suspension bottoms out, although you dialed the suspension to the correct SAG, you really might need another type of bike.

  11. #11
    Oh Yeah Baby
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    Get the frame replaced then "Flip It".

    Use the $$$ towards a stronger bike.
    Misfit Psycles diSSent

  12. #12
    Weekend Warrior
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    Quote Originally Posted by tenbsmith View Post
    Keep In mind that the shop owner is likely to question how it broke, because certain types of damage may not be covered under warrantee. To provide an extreme example, if you were repeatedly taking that bike off 8 foot drops to flat, that is outside the intended use of an XC bike, and it would be reasonable for the company to say this fell outside warrantee. Ideally, the bike shop should have asked you about the style of riding you intended and prevented something like that from happening. The point is, bike shops and manufacturers deal with a lot of people who broke their bikes because of misuse, so donít get angry if they start asking you some questions. And, if you honestly see a that you may have played a role in breaking the frame be prepared to compromise, maybe you end up paying something to get a new frame.
    Ok I totally understand that that could be an issue. I am going today after work to talk to them. Hopefully they will understand. But to be totally honest here, I was not doing anything remotely hard on my bike. (which is why I am certain it was purely my weight or maybe some flaw in that particular frame). I was on a very simple XC trail and the only thing I can think of that would have done it (cause I didnt even realize it till i was cleaning my bike after the ride) is a small patch of rocks I was riding over. I never had any hard drops and never heard any kind of snap or crack. It was a relatively normal simple ride that I do every day. And Im no where close to going off 4 foot drops so I assure you it wasn't anything like that. All I want out of a bike is to be able to climb mountains and go back down them with out braking anything. I figured that full suspension would relieve some of the stress I would be causing from my weight. But I guess some people are saying a hard-tail would actually be stronger. Is this true?

    And thank you everyone for you input and advise, this has all been very helpful!

  13. #13
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    Hardtail frames are usually stiffer than FS frames so they flex less. The suspension can reduce the stress peaks that hit the frame right in its axis (i.e. straight from below), but torsional loads (cornering etc.) are not absorbed by the suspension. However, the question is how much harm flex actually does. I mean of course there is a limit to how much flex a material and frame can take, but softtails prove that even aluminum can take a considerable amount of flex...
    The ride quality of a torsionally stiffer frame may be better though, depending on your priorities: a stiff frame offers a more direct and efficient feel, more predictable handling, and better acceleration (depending on your legs as well ), while a more compliant frame, HT or FS, will be more comfortable.
    I think the biggest problem with a torsionally weak FS frame is the wear of the rear shock bushings.

  14. #14
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    Jow, let us know how it goes with the store.

    I agree that setting sag properly is important, and if Jow can achieve a satisfactory ride that way awesome. On the other hand, firmer springs will almost certainly improve the ride in a number of ways--iincluding less bottoming outóbecause at 285lbs Jow is almost certainly too heavy for the springs that came stock on the bike. The fork and shock on Jowís bike are coil sprung, and many clydes move to air-sprung suspension because it is much easier to set the proper spring rate for a rider of a given weight, but this route gets pretty expensive.

    Midgetís analysis of Hardtail vs. Full Suspension seems reasonable. At the end of the day the choice between HT and FS is really a matter of personal preference.

  15. #15
    Keep The Rubber Side Down
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    Give Diamondback a chance

    I used to work for them and I know first hand that it's a company filled with good people. Most of them ride, so they are very understanding that things happen. But, as someone stated earlier, the shop is going to want an explanation of what you were doing when the frame cracked. If you were doing 8' dropps to flat landings while still sitting down, then your chances of a new frame are slim to non. Also, if your fear is that the new frame will crack, ask the shop to ask Diamondback if they would be willing to give you a credit for the value of the frame towards the cost of a stronger frame. You may have to pay for labor and/or parts that don't cross over from one frame to another.

    Let us know how things turn out. Show pictures of the finished product.

    Good luck!
    Some of my happiest memories in life took place on my bicycles. - Me

  16. #16
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    Ok so I kind of lucked out. The guy who runs the repairs at the LBS is an old friend of mine and he confirmed that it is in fact a common issue with the 2010 Recoil Comp frames (also my weight doesn't help). He also gave me good news that he was 90% sure he could get Diamondback to send him the 2011 frame in which apparently they fixed this flaw. So it looks like I'll be getting the stronger 2011 frame in replace. I'm still gonna look into better rear suspension options, plus there's that 10% chance he might not be able to get the 2011 frame, so we discussed me getting credit towards a different bike in the shop. In which I'm thinking about going the HT route.

    Thank you everyone! Your advise has been so helpful.

  17. #17
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    That sounds like a great plan Jow, best of luck.

    This is a bit corny, but if you can increase the reputation of people who provided good advise by clicking the thumbs-up button under their user name.

  18. #18
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    Mine just broke in the same place.. Son of a bisquit!

  19. #19
    My Brain Hurts!
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    Quote Originally Posted by mellow yellow View Post
    if you were doing 8' dropps to flat landings while still sitting down,

    good luck!
    OW!!

    Quote Originally Posted by lackeym View Post
    Mine just broke in the same place.. Son of a bisquit!
    Well at least you know the path to getting it replaced....what year was your frame? If Diamondback acknowledges a frame flaw you still may have recourse if it is out of warranty...good luck!
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ProfGumby View Post
    OW!!


    Well at least you know the path to getting it replaced....what year was your frame? If Diamondback acknowledges a frame flaw you still may have recourse if it is out of warranty...good luck!

    Out of warranty! the funny part is I sent DB a email thru their site looking for advice and they said they would replace it. Very friendly. However when I gave them my address in states they said couldn't do it and you need to talk to DB US. I didn't know I was on the Canadian site when I sent my request.

    Got the contact information for DB US sent the picture with the same information and they said go talk to a dealer. Talked to the dealer and they are currently in the process of selling me a new bike. Probably not a DB from the looks of it. Dealer said no chance on getting a new swing arm you are pretty much SOL and to replace it you are better off buying a new bike.

    Shame cause I was growing fond of it

    I am either going to move to Canada for better customer service or buy a new bike.

    Choices.

    I will keep you posted

  21. #21
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    Just a thought but the first picture shows a sticker on the frame that says the bike was made in "Chicago" or....................... "China"? I am going to guess China. Unfortunately, probably not the best quality control coming out of China. I hope they make it right and you get a bike you can enjoy!
    "El Cajon?, that's the anus of San Diego"

  22. #22
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    My advice? Take it back, get your money back, save up some more and buy a hard tail mountain bike.

    To be honest, suspension on cheap bikes is almost no use at all. You can get a better and lighter hard tail bike for the same money, but a lot better one for a bit more money. For big guys, cheap suspension is a gimmick and really not giving you anything like the payback for lugging around a very heavy bike.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooTallUK View Post
    My advice? Take it back, get your money back, save up some more and buy a hard tail mountain bike.

    To be honest, suspension on cheap bikes is almost no use at all. You can get a better and lighter hard tail bike for the same money, but a lot better one for a bit more money. For big guys, cheap suspension is a gimmick and really not giving you anything like the payback for lugging around a very heavy bike.
    my advice, don't be a pendejo and realize that this is an ancient thread and the op has long since gotten a new frame

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpfitness View Post
    my advice, don't be a pendejo and realize that this is an ancient thread and the op has long since gotten a new frame
    Sorry. Please let me be as AWESOME as you. Throbber.

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