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  1. #1
    Gonna get better at this
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    BRAKES: Hope vs. Hayes vs. other?

    6'2" 220 lbs, building Turner Five Spot for All Mountain, some jumping

    Which BRAKE?

    Hope - LBS says parts and kits sometimes hard to get because they are out of England

    Hayes El Camino - uses brake fluid instead of mnera oil

    Other?

    Looking for the best in this order: (1) Function (2) Durability & Maintenance (3) Weight.

    Thanks for your time,
    Dan

  2. #2
    Old Fart
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    BRAKES: Hope vs. Hayes vs. other?

    I just installed a set of Avid BB7's. So far I have to say I'm very impressed, great modulation and stopping power. They were easy to intall and work great. I also used a set of Flak Jacket cables. There is no reistance whatsoever in the brake. I've only gotten in about half a dozen rides to date but I don't regret spending the $. ($69/wheel from Performace with a price match on the CBO price)
    If you say gullible slowly enough it sounds like "oranges"

  3. #3
    29 some of the time...
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    Hydraulic brakes are the way to go. The avid cable brakes are nice for simplicity and do have good power, but overall don't have as positive of engagement at the lever. Cable disca are also a bit harder to get both front and rear to feel the same at the lever. Some swear by them, but for big guys I think hydro is the way to go.

    Hope brakes have US distribution and tech support. They are also supported by QBP and BTI, a couple of the main lbs distributors. Good power. Smart bleeding, like a car/motorcycle. Expensive.

    Hayes mag or elcamino are good brakes. Parts readily available at just about any bike shop. I have been running a set with 7" rotors and am digging them. Nice and powerfull, and not too heavy. They aren't as easy to get a good brake bleed as the mags or other brakes, but that is my only complaint.

    Avid juicy brakes are another good option. I ran these for about 2 years. Good power and modulation. Nice bleed kit, but still a bit of a pain to get all the bubbles out. I also ran these with 7in rotors. Parts are available at most shops.

    Shimano hydros. Surprisingly strong. Easy to bleed, like car/motorcycle. Parts readily available at local shops. Available with 6,7,or 8in rotors although I have been happy with the 6in rotors on my xc bike. Mineral oil is easy to get. In a pinch I have used basic mineral oil from the local drug store.

    Personally I think my favorite for performance and adjustability is a toss up between the avid juicy seven and the hayes elcamino. Either is a great choice. I am currently running the elcaminos on my trail bike.

    If my decision were based on maintenance and power, then I think shimano would win out. I would give the hope honorable mention, but since you can't be gauranteed to find pads or parts at the lbs I wouldn't trust them for vacations. Being able to bleed the system without a kit or special tools is a big plus. Both shimano and hope have great stopping power, but more of an on-off feeling than the hayes/avid systems.

  4. #4
    Sumo-Clydedale
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    I am also riding Avid BB7s. I picked up a set with new rotors etc. for $110 on Ebay. They are a very good brake, and easy to setup. I am certainly not as experienced as a lot on this forum, but I do like the brake and they work well for XC applications. I think it will probably come down to a cost to benefit ratio. I am sure there are a few other brake systems which are better, but I am not sure for the cost.

  5. #5
    Old Fart
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    Brakes

    [QUOTE=dscot420]Hydraulic brakes are the way to go. The avid cable brakes are nice for simplicity and do have good power, but overall don't have as positive of engagement at the lever. Cable disca are also a bit harder to get both front and rear to feel the same at the lever. Some swear by them, but for big guys I think hydro is the way to go.[QUOTE=dscot420]

    I have never ridden hydraulics so I can't comment on a comparison between hydraulics and mechanicals. I can only say that switching from XT's to the Avids I am very pleased. I personally couldn't justify the cost of replacing my levers/shifters/brakes. I would agree I am still playing a bit to get the same feel front and back. However, the difference is minimal and I haven't found it at all bothersome.
    If you say gullible slowly enough it sounds like "oranges"

  6. #6
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    I am using Avid BB7s as well, and I couldn't be happier with them... Easy to install, and set up, great power, and modulation... $68 a piece for the 160mm If you want more stopping power get the 185mm or 203mm.

    You forget all about them they are so trouble free.. once the pads wear a little click each of the red knobs once, and your brakes feel brand new again....

  7. #7
    Gonna get better at this
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    dscot420 ...
    Great summary ... power and maintenance, as you describe those attributes, would be at the top of my list. Power would include modulation. Although I salute the simplicity and therefore the cost/benefit of Avid mechanicals, and Avid's stellar reputation, I am inclined to go hydraulic. But you have made it clear that I still need to do more homework.

    Thank you all for your thoughtful, well-written responses.

    I will come back here in a few weeks with a refinement on my question. (I have the Turner Five Spot frame, but because I want the best components, I am researching them and buying them as I can afford them ... this will take time.)

  8. #8
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    What about Magura Louise FR???

    Super strong, pretty light, easy to setup and maintain.

  9. #9
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    Another vote for the Avid ball bearing mechanical. Easy to setup, easy to maintain, and plenty powerful. Oh, and they're a great price

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