Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Team Chilidog!
    Reputation: Stripes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    7,232

    New question here. Brake dive on 100 RLC 200 lb rider

    Hi all,

    My husband has my 05 100 Fox Float RLC, and it dives on him pretty bad. Especially when braking, and that gets him in fights with the ground.

    Given we're both around the same weight range (200 lbs), I was wondering what everyone here thinks would be a good fix.

    Choices (in no particular order):
    1) Get the fork Push'd
    2) Get a good coil fork (which one)?
    2a) Fox Vanilla RLC Push'd is $590
    2b) Manitou Minute? which one if any? Not such great reviews
    2c) Marzocci coil? which one?
    3) Other forks?
    4) Is 90lbs enough air? Would more make it way too harsh?

    The top range we're looking at is around $600, and it needs to have 100mm travel (this is for an Intense Tracer).

    Please let me know any experiences you have with brake dive, and if it's a Fox specific thing (I've never noticed this before when I had the fork, and my current fork is Push'd so it's soooo smooth ).

    Let me know what would probably be the more reasonable thing to do. I'm not attached to any brand in this case, but it needs to be able to hold a Clyde and be adjustable.

  2. #2
    Pain is a way of life
    Reputation: paintmc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    149
    Go with a Vanilla...I have a Non-Pushed Vanilla 2006 130R, and I weight 215lbs and I am loving this fork. Just be sure to get the correct spring. It comes with 3 springs but those are only good if your 3 years old and skinny.....lol

    Get the yellow spring...sold seperate

    Hope this helps.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    180
    Couple thoughts Stripes, maybe things you haven't tried -
    Add air and see what it does, keep sag at least 15% though. 90 psi sounds low for a 200#er. Brake dive results from high static loads on the fork, maybe double or triple normal loads, a worse case semi-static situation. He can reduce dive a bit by pulling his weight back and consciously not leaning as hard on the handle bars. That fork has compression adjustment - crank it up to full and see if it wonít reduce the dive depth and the forward weight shift that dive induces, then back off from full to find a happy medium. Make sure the rebound is quick enough to allow the fork to extend after a bump so it isnít aggravating things by packing down. A good fork like that should be able to do the job.

    So, Iím looking for a ride report from you. I was out Sunday again on El Sereno and gawd I love this X-5, going up and especially down. It is so much fun hitting things and flying with it, I literally have a buzz going by the end of the descent. What a fine item!
    Since yours is a little cousin of mine almost, I'm anxious to see what you think.
    K

  4. #4
    Team Chilidog!
    Reputation: Stripes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    7,232
    Quote Originally Posted by bayareamtnbiker
    Couple thoughts Stripes, maybe things you haven't tried -
    Add air and see what it does, keep sag at least 15% though. 90 psi sounds low for a 200#er. Brake dive results from high static loads on the fork, maybe double or triple normal loads, a worse case semi-static situation. He can reduce dive a bit by pulling his weight back and consciously not leaning as hard on the handle bars. That fork has compression adjustment - crank it up to full and see if it wonít reduce the dive depth and the forward weight shift that dive induces, then back off from full to find a happy medium. Make sure the rebound is quick enough to allow the fork to extend after a bump so it isnít aggravating things by packing down. A good fork like that should be able to do the job.
    Alright.. what would you suggest setting it at? I've been told between 100 and 120 psi, but that's a BIG delta.

    So, Iím looking for a ride report from you. I was out Sunday again on El Sereno and gawd I love this X-5, going up and especially down. It is so much fun hitting things and flying with it, I literally have a buzz going by the end of the descent. What a fine item!
    Since yours is a little cousin of mine almost, I'm anxious to see what you think.
    K
    Oh geez, I need to ride somewhere other than urban assaults and Baylands in Palo Alto then. I haven't been able to give it a full run through, which is why I haven't posted a ride report yet.

  5. #5
    29 some of the time...
    Reputation: AL29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,945
    As suggested already: 1.More air pressure 2.More compression damping

    I think that the Fox recommended air rates are a bit off when it comes to the clyesdale range. I even had a demo bike set up by the head fox tech and it was still really soft when cranking or braking hard. On air shocks I simply go with what feels good and throw sag measurement by the wayside. My fork for my hardtail only has about 5% sag, but I get full travel on the bigger drops at my local trail system. If I stick to basic trail riding and don't get the bike more than a foot off the ground then I would have to run lower pressure to get full travel.

    Air suspension is usually a compromise on one end of the spectrum. They are either too stiff when setup for bigger hits or too soft and brake dive if setup only for trail use. Just use the mfg. settings as guidelines and adjust to match your (or in this case your husbands) riding style. Don't get stuck to them as the only way to do it

  6. #6
    Bike to the Bone...
    Reputation: rzozaya1969's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    8,291
    Quote Originally Posted by stripes
    Alright.. what would you suggest setting it at? I've been told between 100 and 120 psi, but that's a BIG delta.



    Oh geez, I need to ride somewhere other than urban assaults and Baylands in Palo Alto then. I haven't been able to give it a full run through, which is why I haven't posted a ride report yet.
    I'm 230 lbs + gear. I have a Fox Talas fork, and I've run it at 100psi, but for the last ride I set it up at 90 psi. I haven't noticed the brake dive, but I usually lean back when braking, and I'm running a FS bike. I don't know if that affects or not.

    About the forks, probably have your current fork Pushed, it would be the cheapest option and you know how a Pushed fork works... (actually, I don't ).

    I don't know about the new Minutes, but I've read that they were flexy. I think the 2006 models come with 32mm stantchions.

    How about a RS REBA?

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Swerny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,026
    I weigh about 220 with gear.
    I have a 2003 Float 100RLC on my Kona and a Van 130RLC on my Slayer.
    I have been running the Float at about 90 PSI, and am pretty happy with it.
    Play with the rebound & compression and go from there.

    I just had the Van rebuilt with the green spring and Iím loving it now.
    Mike
    Toronto, Canada
    2014 Giant TCX SLR2
    2013 Trek Stache 8
    2011 Giant Defy Advanced 0

  8. #8
    Team Chilidog!
    Reputation: Stripes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    7,232
    Quote Originally Posted by MS MSP
    I weigh about 220 with gear.
    I have a 2003 Float 100RLC on my Kona and a Van 130RLC on my Slayer.
    I have been running the Float at about 90 PSI, and am pretty happy with it.
    Play with the rebound & compression and go from there.

    I just had the Van rebuilt with the green spring and Iím loving it now.
    I don't know the geometry of the Slayer, but the Intense is pretty much XC race. I upped the PSI to 110-120, and he seems a lot happier.

    Thanks everyone!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Swerny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,026
    Quote Originally Posted by stripes
    I don't know the geometry of the Slayer, but the Intense is pretty much XC race. I upped the PSI to 110-120, and he seems a lot happier.

    Thanks everyone!
    That sounds about right. Good to hear.
    I went for a ride tonight, and checked my 2005 Fox manual,. and it recommended 115 PSI for over 220 pounds.
    I thought that was high, and the 2003 online manual says I should be running about 80-85.

    Since my fork is a 2003, 90 works for me.
    I didn't realize there were different recommendations from year to year.
    Sorry if I mislead you.
    Mike
    Toronto, Canada
    2014 Giant TCX SLR2
    2013 Trek Stache 8
    2011 Giant Defy Advanced 0

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,123
    Quote Originally Posted by MS MSP
    That sounds about right. Good to hear.
    I went for a ride tonight, and checked my 2005 Fox manual,. and it recommended 115 PSI for over 220 pounds.
    I thought that was high, and the 2003 online manual says I should be running about 80-85.

    Since my fork is a 2003, 90 works for me.
    I didn't realize there were different recommendations from year to year.
    Sorry if I mislead you.
    I ride a Fox 100x and weigh 215lbs. A 100x is alittle different equiped, with Teralogic, but anyway I am able to run 80lbs due to the fork exibiting less dive. This would be similar to a Pushed fork. The only way I can get my suspension to wear I like it is to bring along my shock pump and make constant stops with psi and rebound changes. When it feels good, it is good. Sag is a starting point(mine is 15%). I will usually go riding alone so my constant stops does'nt inconvienience anyone. Just my 2 cents.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Clyde Sdale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    35
    I ride an '03 Palomino with a Fox Float 100 RL. I have a bout 110 pumped in there and I don't have any brake dive (235 lbs + ride gear). Then again, if I have to brake hard enough to induce brake dive, I'm probably off the saddle and have my weight biased towards the rear of the bike. Just my $.02

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •