Results 1 to 21 of 21

Thread: The bike for me

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    9

    The bike for me

    *Edit*

    Sorry I originaly wrote this thread right before i went to bed after 36 hours of no sleep.


    So let me start over.

    I am a 31 year old new comer to the whole Mountain bike scene. I am here because my poor choices in diet have landed me on deaths door step.

    I am 6'3 pushing 400lbs... And if I do not change my life now, then I will not live to see my 32nd birthday.

    So here I am, making a life changing desicion to better my life style, and habbits.

    I have doon alot of surffing on this fourm and have found alot of people who are in the same boat as me, and have even found some helpful tips and what not.

    But it seems that certain aspects are always catered to each individual.

    So I guess I will get to it. How do I measure up for the right bike?

    I would assume from waht i read that the following are factors.

    Hight, weight and goals.

    I am 6'3 so how big of a bike would I need? Me being 380+ will i need special tires/wheels or suspensions? Im thinking that I would mainly like to do road first to build up endurnce before i tackle the trails. So do i need certain tires?

    Please any help would be appriciated.
    Also thinking about buying a Indoor trainer to attach to the bike for bad weather training.

    Any advince on this?
    Last edited by Fatguyonlittlebike; 01-06-2013 at 12:18 AM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    898
    At 6'3", you'll be looking at around 20" frame. But that's still a fairly arbitrary measurement. Ideally, you should be looking for how the top-tube fits - aka the reach. At your size, this will be important because you will have a lot of weight on your wrists. The correct reach will help you balance your weight over the bike.

    You may need to source some stronger wheels. In my experience, the factory built ones are OK, but at our big boy weights, they can develop problems faster. Others can probably advise what the good heavy duty wheels are to get.

    I think you might be out of luck for indoor trainers. I'm 300lb and I haven't found one yet rated for my weight.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    468
    Welcome to the boards!

    The main thing that comes to mind is wheel sets. This is probably the first part(s) that fails on a Clydesdale. Now with that said, you don't need to drop a grand on a set of wheels either. My advice is a set of Stan's Flow EX rims laced to a set of Hope Pro 2 hubs using very stout spokes/nipples...the more spokes the better (32 or 36)...especially the rear wheel.

    As for bikes, I would look into a Hard Tail (HT) for starters...aka front suspension only and stick with aluminum or steal...no carbon frames. I can't list all the bikes or frame sets that can support our weight but there is more than a few for sure. The one that comes to mind is a Kona Hoss...but I think they stopped production of the Hoss which means you could find a deal a used one.

    Misc advice: Buy a Gel seat that best fits your sit bones and buy some padded shorts or underwear. Areotech carries shorts in your size. I highly suggest the padded underwear since you can use them with standard shorts of your choice. These item will go a long ways in helping you reach your goals. It's a lot easier riding bikes if your butt doesn' hurt. Further more, if you have a smart phone, down load Runtastics Mountain Bike app. You can log your times an milage and use the milage to enter our 2013 Clyesdale challenge. It's just something we do to have fun help with our goals.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    9
    Thank you both for you help.

    Does tire size matter? 26 or 29?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    468
    Quote Originally Posted by Fatguyonlittlebike View Post
    Thank you both for you help.

    Does tire size matter? 26 or 29?
    I couldn't tell you to be honest. So hopefully someon with more experience can chime in on the subject.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    25
    The Redline D440 was a good choice for me to get going. Cheap and the frame set is solid with good resale value. Wheelset is poor for a clyde but if you're starting on a "paved bike path" it'll work and you always can up grade later.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The bike for me-img_20121111_140732.jpg  


  7. #7
    MaverickMotoMedia.com
    Reputation: Gigantic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,436
    What ever bike you get, start out riding on paved paths to boost your endurance. Measure your progress- Strava or map my ride are both great smart phone apps to track your riding. Start out with shorter rides, 10 miles or so, over varied terrain- hills and flat, to increase your stamina. It's going to be brutal at first, don't give up! after 2-3 months of paved riding, try out some easier singletrack trails. I made the mistake of going on a very technical trail my first time out and hated it so much that I regretted getting a mountain bike. Fortunately, I found some easier trails and was able to both build my skills and stamina.
    It's worth noting that mountain biking is quite different from road riding in that it not only requires a considerable amount of physical fitness, but a good deal of technical skill. It's worth seeing if your local MTB clubs offer skills seminars for beginners. It will help with your learning curve, immensely.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    468
    Another bike choice would be a Specialized Hardrock. Specialized is one of the first MTB companies and the Hardrok model is an entry level bike but it's supposed to take a beaten. Again, I suggest having a bike shop build you some solid wheels. I bought a new bike and bent a rim the first day. Picked up my new more soli wheels Saturday and life is good!



    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    What ever bike you get, start out riding on paved paths to boost your endurance. Measure your progress- Strava or map my ride are both great smart phone apps to track your riding. Start out with shorter rides, 10 miles or so, over varied terrain- hills and flat, to increase your stamina. It's going to be brutal at first, don't give up! after 2-3 months of paved riding, try out some easier singletrack trails. I made the mistake of going on a very technical trail my first time out and hated it so much that I regretted getting a mountain bike. Fortunately, I found some easier trails and was able to both build my skills and stamina.
    It's worth noting that mountain biking is quite different from road riding in that it not only requires a considerable amount of physical fitness, but a good deal of technical skill. It's worth seeing if your local MTB clubs offer skills seminars for beginners. It will help with your learning curve, immensely.
    Absolutely agree!


    I had trouble ridding one loop none stop my first time mtb riding and I had been riding 10 miles a week on paved roads. Don't forget to hydrate as well...water.

    Also, check and see if your area has any mtb clubs or organizations when you decide to hit the trails. A lot o time they offer free beginner clinics to help teach people techniques on mtb riding. I come from a BMX racing back ground and still found these clinics to be very informative!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    898
    Quote Originally Posted by Fatguyonlittlebike View Post
    Thank you both for you help.

    Does tire size matter? 26 or 29?
    Not really. Each size, has its proponents and fanboys. The market is looking to push hardtails to 29" now so you may not have so much choice in the matter.

    I personally switched to a 29er and I'm happy with it.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    898
    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    What ever bike you get, start out riding on paved paths to boost your endurance. Measure your progress- Strava or map my ride are both great smart phone apps to track your riding. Start out with shorter rides, 10 miles or so, over varied terrain- hills and flat, to increase your stamina. It's going to be brutal at first, don't give up! after 2-3 months of paved riding, try out some easier singletrack trails. I made the mistake of going on a very technical trail my first time out and hated it so much that I regretted getting a mountain bike. Fortunately, I found some easier trails and was able to both build my skills and stamina.
    It's worth noting that mountain biking is quite different from road riding in that it not only requires a considerable amount of physical fitness, but a good deal of technical skill. It's worth seeing if your local MTB clubs offer skills seminars for beginners. It will help with your learning curve, immensely.
    If you don't have a smartphone, just map your routes with Google Earth to get an idea of the distances.

    Also, get an account (and some friends*) on Dailymile. I've been using it for over a year now and it's been really motivating - especially the weekly leaderboards so you can see how you are going compared to your friends.

    *friends in the social networking sense, not necessarily people you actually know.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nate3510's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    220
    Check meetup.com most city's have mtb groups and the majority of them have beginner rides with experienced leaders that can give you advice to help improve your skills and also maintaining your bike.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    10

    wheels for carrying guy & 2 kids

    Quote Originally Posted by 50calray View Post
    Welcome to the boards!

    The main thing that comes to mind is wheel sets. This is probably the first part(s) that fails on a Clydesdale. Now with that said, you don't need to drop a grand on a set of wheels either. My advice is a set of Stan's Flow EX rims laced to a set of Hope Pro 2 hubs using very stout spokes/nipples...the more spokes the better (32 or 36)...especially the rear wheel.
    hi there,

    I'm wondering if you'd recommend this wheelset combination to carry a guy (i'm 240lb), and two kids (one is 40lb the other is 30 and growing). So that's combined 310 weight -- but most of the time it'll just be the guy and possibly one kid.

    I have a 26" Ross Hybrid which has served me very well, but the rear wheel broke a few months ago, and now the axle. I'd like to invest in a better quality wheel for city riding, without buying something too expensive that'll get stolen (too quickly).

    Are there wheelsets that are designed to carry 240lb guys & occasionally kids (70lb of kid weight)?

    Thank you!

  13. #13
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,632
    Ive been a gym rat for 26 years.

    The one universal truth to fitness is this.... consistency is more important than intensity.

    Dont hurt your self. Dont push to hard. Dont set your goals to an unrealistic level that will leave you discouraged if you fail to meet them.

    Find an activity that you ENJOY (bike riding ftw!) and do it in MODERATION on a regular basis. The lbs will melt off you if your goal is to have fun and get in better shape while doing so.

    Once you have been at it for a long time and your conditioning level is better, THEN you can push the intensity and gain results from a hard ride/workout. Until then overdoing it is just going to make the exercise not fun and leave you less inclined to ride.

    good luck! keep us updated on your progress as the year continues!

  14. #14
    No talent hack
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    941
    Quote Originally Posted by asbefore View Post
    hi there,

    I'm wondering if you'd recommend this wheelset combination to carry a guy (i'm 240lb), and two kids (one is 40lb the other is 30 and growing). So that's combined 310 weight -- but most of the time it'll just be the guy and possibly one kid.

    I have a 26" Ross Hybrid which has served me very well, but the rear wheel broke a few months ago, and now the axle. I'd like to invest in a better quality wheel for city riding, without buying something too expensive that'll get stolen (too quickly).

    Are there wheelsets that are designed to carry 240lb guys & occasionally kids (70lb of kid weight)?

    Thank you!
    The wheel set calray has suggested is one of the strongest set ups you can get. I believe he runs the exact setup and I will be replacing my bike's bits with it as well. Since I highly doubt you are doing big drops with the kiddos on board, it will be PLENTY strong for you toting them as well as for just you on a trail.
    Fat guys need bikes too.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    11
    Hi guys!

    I need help! I'm 198cm= 6.5 ft tall and inseam is 96cm. I'm looking for new bike, am/enduro full sunspension mountain bike. I have earlier Specialized enduro but i didnt like it. So, you guys have to tell me what is "the" bike for me. My budjet is so small (~2500), because i'm student.

    Thanks.

  16. #16
    dru
    dru is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,642
    You are my exact height and inseam. You'll need an XXL or Xl frame fro sure. You'll want a seat tube length of at least 600 mm or 23 to 24 inches. For 26 inch wheels look for a heat tube length of at least 160 mm, or more. In 29er I wouldn't go less than 130 mm. Your top tube length should be at least 625 mm or more for either wheel size.

    There's another thread here for really tall guys that lists all the manufacturers that cater to us tall folk.
    What do the tall ride?

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by dru View Post
    You are my exact height and inseam. You'll need an XXL or Xl frame fro sure. You'll want a seat tube length of at least 600 mm or 23 to 24 inches. For 26 inch wheels look for a heat tube length of at least 160 mm, or more. In 29er I wouldn't go less than 130 mm. Your top tube length should be at least 625 mm or more for either wheel size.

    Drew
    Okay... Any 150-170mm travel 26er bikes which have geometry like you said? Or any 29er? Remember my budjet is about 2500

    And sry my worse english..

  18. #18
    dru
    dru is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,642
    This was the link I should have posted. It has all the manufacturers making 'big' frames.

    You'll need to go to their websites to get more specific information such as full suspension vs hardtail, short or long travel, etc.

    Which companies cater to the ridiculously tall?

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  19. #19
    R.I.P. DogFriend
    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,909
    There are hubs and spokes that are made with tandem bikes in mind, and there are rims stouter than Flows. A set of wheels that will last for the long haul would be a wise investment IMHO because, you feel like you have no choice but to invest in your fitness, and this is not a project; it's a program.

    For hubs, I would look at Chris King, Hadley, or DT Swiss 540 for the rear hub. The front hub is not as critical.

    For spokes, Sapim makes the "Strong' spoke that is 2.3mm at the j-bend and then tapers to 2.0mm.

    Rims, I think I would look beyond the Flow at something like the MTX33, or maybe something from Halo.

    If, no. . . . . when you get down below 275, you can maybe reward yourself by having your hubs relaced to something like a Flow or maybe the WTB i23 Frequency, and use some normal butted spokes. But that is 100lbs down the trail. JMHO. yes, a wheelset like that will be expensive, but at this point, an investment in yourself seems like it's mandatory if you want to healthier days.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1
    im 6'4" 300lbs and i have a redline monocog that i upgraded to an igh rear wheel i picked up for cheap off ebay. My redline is holding up pretty well its a heavy bike seems to be built strong.

  21. #21
    I am the Tin Man!
    Reputation: grizzlyplumber's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    382
    Good luck to the OP on your journey. I am 6'3 and started riding at 285. Within 6 months I was down under 220 and have stayed there for the last 4 years. One of the things I found was the days that I did ride were the days that were easier to eat right as well. I couldnt imagine coming back from a 5 AM 15 mile ride and going to Jack in the Box, it just didnt make sense. But days that I hit the snooze instead of getting up were easier to justify just a cheeseburger and fries, maybe a coke too. And while you are at it just supersize the whole da** thing. You get the picture. Good luck and keep at it.
    Flying the HiFi...Clyde style.


    SOMEBODY I LOVE NEEDS A HEART!

    I AM AN ORGAN DONOR, ARE YOU?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •