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  1. #1
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    Best Clydsedale bike?

    I'm an entry level rider that weighs about 260. I'm looking to buy a new bike soon.

    I've been told the Kona Hoss is good, is a hardtail a better idea for me than a softtail since I'm so heavy? Or are there good softtails for Clydesdales?

    All input is appreciated.

  2. #2
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    I just realized I said "softtail" I meant full suspension.... Sorry, I'm a new rider.

  3. #3
    The Amazing Shrinking Man
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Dutch
    I'm an entry level rider that weighs about 260. I'm looking to buy a new bike soon.

    I've been told the Kona Hoss is good, is a hardtail a better idea for me than a softtail since I'm so heavy? Or are there good softtails for Clydesdales?

    All input is appreciated.
    Kona Hoss is excellent! I'd stay with a rigid chainstay frame, as full suspension is jusat something else to break! Unlaess you are doing DH or some pretty extreme trail conditions, Full Suspension isn't really necessary!
    [SIZE=4]Feel free to visit my blog: http://theamazingshrinkingman.blogspot.com
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  4. #4
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    Given that you are new to the sport, pic up a hoss and put a year and some serious miles on it. If you love the sport, love getting out and riding, and thing that you would benefit from a fs frame at that point, you get to buy another toy then!
    riding a HT for a year will also increase your skill level to boot!

  5. #5
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    Another option

    I've been recommending the Specialized Rockhopper Sport Disc as a good clyde bike over the Hoss for a number of reasons. To keep it simple, it has a better fork, brakes and drivetrain IMO. Both bikes are very good and run around $900. Here's a link to the bike:

    http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkM...keTab=techspec

    If you want to go full suspension, there are many options, but expect to be paying $1500+ for a good, clyde-worthy build. If you can spend that much, we can go down that road, but I'll save those recommendations for later if you say you really want to spend that kinda money on your first bike.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Call_me_Clyde
    I've been recommending the Specialized Rockhopper Sport Disc as a good clyde bike over the Hoss for a number of reasons. To keep it simple, it has a better fork, brakes and drivetrain IMO. Both bikes are very good and run around $900.
    I'm a Hoss man myself, but Bob's got a good point here. The parts spec on the Specialized is actually a wee bit better than the Kona's. In particular, the fork on the Hoss is terrible. Its strong, but its performance stinks. I'm sure either frame will hold up, unless you're doing 12' drops to flat.

    Quote Originally Posted by Call_me_Clyde
    If you want to go full suspension, there are many options, but expect to be paying $1500+ for a good, clyde-worthy build. If you can spend that much, we can go down that road, but I'll save those recommendations for later if you say you really want to spend that kinda money on your first bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    Given that you are new to the sport, pic up a hoss and put a year and some serious miles on it. If you love the sport, love getting out and riding, and thing that you would benefit from a fs frame at that point, you get to buy another toy then!
    riding a HT for a year will also increase your skill level to boot!
    I agree about going with a HT first, then deciding if you really enjoy riding, what type of riding you like then how much you're willing to put into a bike. A clyde-worthy full-suspension is definitely a $1500+ investment, particularly if you'll be purchasing a new bike.

    C-Z described exactly what I've done. I bought my Hoss last October, rode it all winter, spring and into the summer. I decided that I needed a full-suspension, so I just recently purchased a used 2002 Turner RFX frame, which I will slowly build up over the fall/winter. Good luck, let us know what you decide.

    Patrick

  7. #7
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    Thanks for all your input guys.

    One thing. I already have a bike (it sucks, but is workable) and might just get better springs for my front fork and ride it till it breaks. So, It might be the end of this year or beginning of next before I buy. I that case, if I'm still into it, I might want to go full suspension. The trails I've been riding vary from downhill single-track to just riding through the woods on single track, but there is some downhill involved (I just started biking Galbraith mountain in Bellingham, WA).

    Maybe a clyde-worthy fs might be good, do you have recommendations for that? $1500+ might be worth it for me if I got a great bike out of it, you know what I mean? I also like the thought of the Hoss/Rockhopper because I am heavy and probably won't get much lighter. More input would be greatly appreciated!

    I'm super green. I just now learned how to replace a tube and that basic kind of stuf so any input is great!

  8. #8
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    Here's one

    If you don't mind buying direct from the mfr, check this out:

    http://www.ibexbikes.com/Bikes/APG-EXP-LX-Details.html

    Yes, I know it's sold out, but by the time you are ready to buy, the '07 models might be out.

    Not necessarily engineered with larger riders in mind, but it's made with aggressive riding in mind, so it's pretty rugged. The bike comes spec'd with the Reba, which has 32mm stanchions (tubes). Hydraulic disc brakes should be great for stopping someone your weight, too. I can't speak for the strength of the wheelset, so you might have to upgrade there. The drivetrain components are above average. All in all, the bike is a great value.

    In general, what to look for:

    Frames: Look for something that is double or triple butted, or states that it has gussets. The butted frames are thicker in high stress areas, and thinner in low stress areas. This makes the bike strong where it needs to be, yet light. Gussets are basically supports that are welded in high stress areas.

    Forks: Definitely look for something with 32 mm stanchions. Anything less and assume it will flex. Also, as a larger rider, I am a big fan of coil forks and shocks. Newer air technology has made the difference between air and coil minimal, but for large, aggressive riders, coil definitely has it's advantages

    Wheels and hubs: Most bikes come with 32 hole wheels. If you can find a bike that has 36 holes, I'm of the opinion the wheelset will generally be stronger. It's advisable to buy a hand made wheelset as compared to the machine made wheelsets that come on most bikes. Hubs on most stock wheelsets typically lack in quality, but if you get Shimano hubs on the stock wheels, it's probably better than some of the off brand stuff. If you choose to go custom, check the wheels and tires forum for more advice, plenty of good stuff out there. People swear by King hubs, but there are comperable options from Hadley and Hope that will save you hundreds of dollars.

    Brakes: Go with disc brakes. If you get mechanical discs, get Avid BB7's and nothing else. They are the de-facto standard in mechanical disc brakes. read the reviesws here and you'll see why. If the bike is equipped with hydraulic discs, there are many good options out there. Do your research on Avid, Shimano, Hayes. These will be the most common stock hydraulic disc brakes. Most will be 6" rotors. At your size, 7" rotors would be nice, but 6" will suffice.

    Drivetrain: So many options, it's hard to choose. Shifters and derailleurs from Shimano would include LX and XT in the $1500 bike price range. You might see SRAM X.7 or possibly X.9 in this range. All good choices, IMO. Cranksets from Shimano (LX or XT) Truvativ (Firex, Hussefeldt and others) would be common on this range of bike. Hopefully the bike will come with clipless pedals. Shimano's SPD is pretty standard, and many bikes come with SPD clipless pedals.

    Cockpit: Handlebars, stems, seatposts and saddles would be the least of my concerns. Some may argue this point, but the bike should be equipped with suitable cockpit components for your needs. Concentrate on getting 80% of what you want in the other component specs and don't worry about the cockpit components.....yet. Buy them later if you don't like what comes stock.

    Tires. Nice to have a good set, but take whatever the bike comes with and deal with them much like the Cockpit components.

    This is a general overview, and I've probably missed some points. It's something to start from, though. Hopefully others will ad their comments, and you can start to research NOW and be ready by the time you're ready to buy.

    I hope this helps.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  9. #9
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    You guys mentioned the Specialized Rockhopper... If I decided to fork out more and go with the Full suspenson Rockhopper, would that be a good chouce? Or are there better options at a higher price range. I have an LBS with Specialized and another with Kona, I think I'll go with one of those brands unless someone sells me on another brand... There's another LBS in my town with Rocky mountain and Trek.

    I'm still not sure I need full suspension, because I mostly ride single-track (am/xc), but there are some trails wher eyou can get into drops and jumps and I'd like to be able to hit those without worrying that my bike will fall apart. Just today, I went of a little tiny jump on my current bike and bottomed out and ended up in the trees...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Dutch
    You guys mentioned the Specialized Rockhopper... If I decided to fork out more and go with the Full suspenson Rockhopper, would that be a good chouce?
    AFAIK there isn't a Rockhopper full-suspension. Specialized makes the FSR-XC, Stumpjumper FSR, Epic, Enduro, Demo and Big Hit dualies. Which of those are you referring to?

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Dutch
    I'm still not sure I need full suspension, because I mostly ride single-track (am/xc), but there are some trails wher eyou can get into drops and jumps and I'd like to be able to hit those without worrying that my bike will fall apart. Just today, I went of a little tiny jump on my current bike and bottomed out and ended up in the trees...
    You don't necessarily need a full-suspension to do small drops and jumps. A fully will be more comfortable and forgiving. A quality HT (with strong components) will withstand some moderate freeride antics. Obviously, if the poor performance of your bike is causing you to crash then you are exceeding its capablities. It's definitely time to upgrade .

    Personally, I would only consider the Enduro, Demo or Big Hit. The latter two are freeride/DH bikes, the Enduro is a long-travel trailbike. I woudn't even consider the lower end Enduros. The higher end ones are expensive. Being a clyde ain't cheap.

    Patrick

  11. #11
    Fat guy on a bike
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    Well, there were production rockhoppers a few years ago that were very similar to the FSR-Xc (which is closer to the older style Enduro). Specialized has been mixing stuff around and doing 'trickle down' of tech.

    I would suggest giving a good hard tail a go for at least a few months to build skills and endurance. if you find yourself lacking performance on trails that the bike can't handle comfortably, then start looking into full suspension. Then you can probably manage to build a Santa Cruz Heckler for around 2k(D-AM kit), with a coil shock and maybe a Rockshox recon or Pike fork, or a Fox Vanilla fork.

    Being a clyde ain't cheap.
    no kidding, and i thought modding my car was expensive.

  12. #12
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    When I started riding a few months ago I was 250 #'s. I ended up going with a Cannondale Prophet 800 and picked it up for $1550 since it was an 05. You'll probably be able to get a "last season" bike by the time you are in the market for an awesome price. So shop around and save some dough! I like my Cannondale a lot but am not going to tell you it's the best bike for blah, blah, blah reasons. The most important thing is to go out to bike shops and ride some bikes. Everything you read about how awesome a bike is doesn't mean sh*t when you sit on it and it just doesn't work for you. For 1500 bux try to get as much XT or equivelent SRAM stuff (sorry I don't know thier product line) and try to get hydraulic brakes. If you can't get Hydraulic at least make sure you are getting mechanical. I doubt you would find a bike at that price point without mechanical. If you go full suspension consider looking at the bikes that have lockouts on one or both of the suspensions. Then get on-line and read the reviews on the bikes. Remember some of these guys are overly critical, but if everyone is complaining about the rear suspension being crap and the next years model is coming with a different model/brand. Then you know what you are getting. If the worst thing people are saying is the pedals suck...then who cares. I think you get the idea.

  13. #13
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    If you are looking at about $1600 take a look at a Kona coiler that will hold you.When I was looking for a bike I would look for the best frame and fork I could get for the money because parts will brake,Disk brakes are a must the rest of the drive train and wheel set can be upgraded as you brake it.

  14. #14
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    Take a look at the Versus Blitz

    Take a look at them at: adrenalinebikes.com

    I believe they have the 05 bike for under $1,000. There is a good thread on the Downhill forum about the bike.

    I am 230 and ride a Transition Dirtbag, which may be more than you are looking to spend. This is a FR bike but it will take anything you though at it.

  15. #15
    mtbr Buckeye...in Austin
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    Quote Originally Posted by PCinSC
    Personally, I would only consider the Enduro, Demo or Big Hit. The latter two are freeride/DH bikes, the Enduro is a long-travel trailbike. I woudn't even consider the lower end Enduros. The higher end ones are expensive. Being a clyde ain't cheap.

    Patrick
    be wary of the enduro frame. I had a frame failure on my eduro expert and was lucky it happened where it did on the trail. I'm 6'6" 260.

    They warrantied it with no problems, but I lost confidence in the frame.
    We've had many a folk bust those frames. I have a word doc with pics labeled if interested somewhere around here.

    Definitely rent, ride, rent and ride. If you know you'll like the sport then you'll be able to make a more informed and more expensive purchase, and it will be expensive.

    You get what you pay for in our size, unfortunately.

    You don't mind over buying but you definitely don't want to under buy.

    Ebay or Craigslist are great places to get your hands on stuff cheaply.

    Paid $2200 for my Spec Enduro Expert and thought I over bought.....sold the warrantied frame and upgraded to Titus Super Moto. All the parts swapped over. luckily.

    If you're tall look at the 29er RacerX.

    Titus (or equivalent) is what everyone eventually migrates to in Austin. We're really hard on frames here b/c of all the rock.

    Definitely don't go overboard until you know you like the sport, then go nuts.

    Buy once, buy right.

    Most important to look at fit.

    Sorry for rambling, but my $.02.

  16. #16
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    So, if I went with a Heckler, would that be a good choice? Problem is that there's no LBS that sells Santa Cruz, so I can't test-ride... I really like the look/reviews/everything about them. I'm saving up money, so I can handle the price, I just need to know how much to save.

  17. #17
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    I wouldn't recomend buying a bike that you haven't had a chance to ride around. There were a few bikes that I was sold on when I was looking at them on-line but once I actually went out and rode them they just were not a good fit for me. My body geometry just didn't fit right with the bikes geometry.

  18. #18
    I railed it like Kong
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    Take a look at the Kona Coiler. It's got a good frame and geometry for what you want. And for the price you pay you can rock right out of the box. Kona is doing 20% off all 06' right now so tell your LBS if they don't offer you a discount.

    The Heckler is a sweet ride and can be setup exactly how you like too. As you progress on your aggressive and downhill you'll notice some brake jacking but not so on the Kona. Both great bikes and you'd be happy with both.
    I'm UNIQUE... just like everybody else.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Call_me_Clyde
    If you don't mind buying direct from the mfr, check this out:

    http://www.ibexbikes.com/Bikes/APG-EXP-LX-Details.html

    Yes, I know it's sold out, but by the time you are ready to buy, the '07 models might be out.

    Not necessarily engineered with larger riders in mind, but it's made with aggressive riding in mind, so it's pretty rugged. The bike comes spec'd with the Reba, which has 32mm stanchions (tubes). Hydraulic disc brakes should be great for stopping someone your weight, too. I can't speak for the strength of the wheelset, so you might have to upgrade there. The drivetrain components are above average. All in all, the bike is a great value.


    Bob

    I can attest to this bike being solid. I have the 05 Apogee LX and it has held up great so far. I'm probably over 300 with gear and ride XC (and a trip to Moab,UT). Components have held up great. The wheels seem overkill for an XC bike but great for a clyde (Sun Singletracks which apear to be an AM type wheelset). I'm actually running the similar Rhynolite wheels but only because they have XT hubs. I picked this bike up on clearance in Janary for $999 and its got components comparable to a $1500 bike.

  20. #20
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    I had been away from the riding scene for a few years when I bought a Rockhopper Comp Disc after receiving some very helpful info from the board. Since I got the bike two months ago, it has taken everything I have dished out without a single problem. I started out at close to 260 when I bought the bike. I paid a little more than $800 for the bike after tax when I bought it. I had the same problem as you with difficulty in finding a LBS for some manufacturers. I really limited my selection but I have heard some real bad stories about buying a bike without trying it out first and regretting the purchase. Good luck in your search.
    You'd do it for Randolph Scott.

  21. #21
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    [QUOTE=rkonindustry]Take a look at the Kona Coiler. It's got a good frame and geometry for what you want. And for the price you pay you can rock right out of the box. Kona is doing 20% off all 06' right now so tell your LBS if they don't offer you a discount.

    QUOTE]

    One of my buddies rides a Kona and the rear suspension just bent on him when he wasn't really doing much. He's a Clyde too, but a little lighter than me. The way Kona does their rear suspension on full-suspension bike seems like it might fall apart after a bit... I'm no expert though...

    I found out one of my LBS can order Heckler, so I might work with them. It'll be a bit since they're pricey (my wife won't let me just buy it, I have to actually save up)... But I think I'm going to go that route (after test-rding of course).

    What do you think?

  22. #22
    I railed it like Kong
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    The Konas are a known big hit, north shore bike. No way is that frame going to bend just riding along. Something fatigued that frame first and it finally gave up. But i'm not saying that to defend Kona- just so you know. They are a burly bike company that can take abuse.

    What do i think? Go for the heckler if your feeling it. THat was my second choice. I went round and round for a good month: Heckler vs. Coiler I've ridden the heckler once and loved it. I decided the coiler deelux because Kona has 20% off 06 bikes. Came with an amazing specs that i did some upgrades to. But if i had a Heckler at the same price and it was in front of me i probably would have leaned that way.

    Like i said before- both great bikes. Buy it and don't look back.
    I'm UNIQUE... just like everybody else.

  23. #23
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    if your budget is 1500 I recomend you the coiler, probably your friend kona is a xc dual suspension or the dawg is more am oriented, but the coiler is pretty good for the money, theres the regular coiler at 1250 at wheelworld, but at the end this bike will be a little heavy because the componentry. The heckler is a really good option bcause you can costumize your bike in componentry, color, and build it as a 28-29 pounds xc bike (Im doing this) or 33 pounds all mountain bike or 36 pounds freeride bike.

    If you are heavy weight like me (im 230 pounds no gears, just naked, jeje) your body will suffer more in a hardtail, so get a good FS as the heckler (quality) or coiler (price wise).

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Dutch
    Maybe a clyde-worthy fs might be good, do you have recommendations for that? $1500+ might be worth it for me if I got a great bike out of it, you know what I mean?
    Look into the Santa Cruz Heckler. They have a build for just a tad under $1600 that should be perfect. If you want more info, there is an article on it on Mountain Bike Action magazine.

  25. #25
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    can I find that article in the web??????????????????????????
    thats a pretty nice price. The bad thing about sc homepage is they been updating the kits prices by almost 2 weeks

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