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  1. #1
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    Best chain and gears for torqueing is there a market ?

    I posted this about 2 years ago and the replies were limited, I have problems snapping chains when I stand up and torque in top gear.

    Who makes the truly best chains or am I better off just using mid grade chains and putting a new one on every month or 2.

    I would think for big strong guy's there would be a market for like a 6 speed cassette that is bigger and beefier with a heavy duty ring gear and a little bigger chain size like on how they do motorcycles?

    I am afraid to stand up and torque in top gear because I am afraid of getting hurt when the chain snaps.

    Thanks for insight.

  2. #2
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    How about not standing while in top gear? If your purpose is to gain more speed, select a lower gear and speed up, then go to top gear

  3. #3
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    That is a reply you would expect from a girl.

  4. #4
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    It's just a fact of life...depending on your size/power, you're going to break stuff if you try to muscle everything. That said, SRAM's 991 CrossStep chain has been the strongest I've used, if you're running 9 spd.

  5. #5
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    Thanks, they really don't make the options like they do in motorcycles. I would think they could make a little heavier setup just a touch and it would sell.

    When I hit hills I am getting to the point where I do not want to down shift and just want to stand up and mash. I just changed my cassette and put a new chain on. I snapped a chain last week.

    I am real scared to stand up and mash and apply full strenght because of this.

    For a big strong guy they should make better drive components even if it is a limited market, on my CR 500 it was like add stiff springs and do a revalve to the susoension with an extra clutch plate and heavy clutch springs and you were there.

  6. #6
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    I've only snapped one chain, but I've torn up cassettes. (see my thread on that) I am a very fit and strong guy, but I've resigned to the fact that I have to learn to sit and spin in order to save my equipment.So far my time hasn't suffered, and my cardio is getting a lot better. :-)

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 4

  7. #7
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    It slows me down on hills to sit down and I can never accelerate the way I want in tall gears because I have snapped a chain before and busted my a$$ bad.

  8. #8
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    You wouldn't ride a motorbike like that. If you rode up a hill on a motorbike and just gave it a big helping of throttle, you'd possibly just slow and stall. You'd change down a gear or two then give it some beans. Same on a bike. Wippermann chains seem to come out best in tests but the straight load needed to snap an average 10 speed bike chain is about 2000lbs.
    Take the advice and learn to use the gears to your best advantage. I doubt you ride everywhere spinning out in top gear so stop stamping and work smarter instead of harder. That or fund your new invention!

  9. #9
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    I did not have to downshift my CR 500 and you got good life out of a good chain, the motorcycle never hurt me when it snapped a chain but the bike has.

    I just play ride and have snapped 3 or 4, I ride top gear 80 to 90% of the time and FL is flat. I go faster up a grade by standing and mashing and not downshifting.

    I trust a new chain for about a month of mashing then I will not stand and mash any more. POP! and me almost going over the bars. I hurt my knee good once because of this.
    They should sell a heavier setup not much just a little.

  10. #10
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    What bike are you riding and what are the gears on it? What chains are you using?

  11. #11
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    Sounds more like poor installation than defective chains to me.

    Most 3/32 chains we use are stronger than 1/8 chains these guys use:



    Just get the chain properly installed instead of thinking you're stronger than you really are. Your legs aren't snapping chains, it's the mechanic.

  12. #12
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    An NFL style clyde who weighs 300 pounds plus mashing and is strong will put way more abuse on a chain than that guy.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooTallUK View Post
    What bike are you riding and what are the gears on it? What chains are you using?
    Right now I am running a RH 23 inch with MTX's 33 29's and 46 11 tooth gearing, 90% of the time I am in 11 tooth and 46th tooth ring. I can pull this with no problem and will probably be going to a 50 shortly.

    What happens is the tight turn of the 11 tooth sprocket smokes the chains faster, no matter what chain I have used so far they get smoked quick. I have run 50$ chains and popped them. I think I need to go to a 50 + tooth ring so I can get off the bottom sprocket to keep from burning the chains up'

    I street ride and throw in off road obstacles at high speed, after riding my CR 500 for 25 years the bike is like slow motion so I try and spice it up the best I can.

  14. #14
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    Just so you know - with 26" wheels, a terribly slow 60rpm cadence and 11:46 gearing, you'd be averaging just under 18 mph. If you were up to a more normal 90rpm, that would see a speed of over 26mph.
    Kulhavy won the 2012 Olympic Cross Country Mountain Bike race with an average speed of 14.2 mph.
    Your country needs you.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    An NFL style clyde who weighs 300 pounds plus mashing and is strong will put way more abuse on a chain than that guy.
    It's not about weight, it's about power. That guy puts down WAY more power than you, or me, or any of the rest of the guys on this forum.

    That's Robert Forstemann. He squats 600lbs. And his bike is geared higher than yours.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley View Post
    It's not about weight, it's about power. That guy puts down WAY more power than you, or me, or any of the rest of the guys on this forum.

    That's Robert Forstemann. He squats 600lbs. And his bike is geared higher than yours.
    Power? legs are a joke, Now 65 HP at 6000 RPM in a 225 pound package is a OK running set of legs on a off road bike.

    I have trimmed down and I am now 280. I have 30 more to go. I was up to 325 playing around in the gym, that guy has a much shorter stroke. I had guys in the gym who could squat 600 pounds and there were things in the gym I could do with my legs they had problems with and could not do. Most of the reason was because my knees were twice their size.



    That guy moves 600 pounds but it is over short distance, HP is the amount of work you do moving weight over a distance and in what amount of time. I do not know who that guy is but a 300 pound or 350 pound clyde mashing the petal with full force of all their weight will put more force on the chain than a 200 pound guy with short legs.

    Some of your NFL lineman are going to be able to squat 600 pounds with no problem. I was able to pick 500 pounds up with my shoulders on a Smith Machine with no problem playing around in the gym with my legs. So lifting 600 pounds with your legs is not really that big of a deal now mastering a squat to be able to do it takes more effort and technic.

    When the smaller guy mashes the bike will go forward and not put as much torque on the chain because he is much lighter, the heavier guy has his weight stretching the chain as well as his power stroke. Not only that he's jumping on the chain with a lot more weight.

    If you were to take a NFL style lineman and your guy and measure the force exerted on the chain you would see the strong 325 pounder is applying easily more force to the chain because of all his extra weight plus the longer stroke.

    I ride a 2xl and have the seat post 10 inches up and I am jumping on the chain from that height, I need to get around to buying some 200mm cranks because I think it would help me allot.

    The lighter strong guy will go alot faster for sure but he is not exerting the force on a chain like a strong clyde does.

    One last thing I am hard on chains for whatever reason, I used to break chains on the gym equipment all the time in the gym.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooTallUK View Post
    Just so you know - with 26" wheels, a terribly slow 60rpm cadence and 11:46 gearing, you'd be averaging just under 18 mph. If you were up to a more normal 90rpm, that would see a speed of over 26mph.
    Kulhavy won the 2012 Olympic Cross Country Mountain Bike race with an average speed of 14.2 mph.
    Your country needs you.
    I am not mountain biking, I have serious limitations being my size. I know this from MOTOX motorcycles. I road ride on my modified MTB and make my own trails along the way. I average in between 20 to 30 MPH, I think? I have a 15 MPH Super Z lawn mower and I am using that as a reference. It probably does not count.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    Power? legs are a joke, Now 65 HP at 6000 RPM in a 225 pound package is a OK running set of legs on a off road bike.

    I have trimmed down and I am now 280. I have 30 more to go. I was up to 325 playing around in the gym, that guy has a much shorter stroke. I had guys in the gym who could squat 600 pounds and there were things in the gym I could do with my legs they had problems with and could not do. Most of the reason was because my knees were twice their size.



    That guy moves 600 pounds but it is over short distance, HP is the amount of work you do moving weight over a distance and in what amount of time. I do not know who that guy is but a 300 pound or 350 pound clyde mashing the petal with full force of all their weight will put more force on the chain than a 200 pound guy with short legs.

    Some of your NFL lineman are going to be able to squat 600 pounds with no problem. I was able to pick 500 pounds up with my shoulders on a Smith Machine with no problem playing around in the gym with my legs. So lifting 600 pounds with your legs is not really that big of a deal now mastering a squat to be able to do it takes more effort and technic.

    When the smaller guy mashes the bike will go forward and not put as much torque on the chain because he is much lighter, the heavier guy has his weight stretching the chain as well as his power stroke. Not only that he's jumping on the chain with a lot more weight.

    If you were to take a NFL style lineman and your guy and measure the force exerted on the chain you would see the strong 325 pounder is applying easily more force to the chain because of all his extra weight plus the longer stroke.

    I ride a 2xl and have the seat post 10 inches up and I am jumping on the chain from that height, I need to get around to buying some 200mm cranks because I think it would help me allot.

    The lighter strong guy will go alot faster for sure but he is not exerting the force on a chain like a strong clyde does.

    One last thing I am hard on chains for whatever reason, I used to break chains on the gym equipment all the time in the gym.
    There's so much bad logic/facts/math in here that I don't even know where to begin. In fact, I'm not even going to waste my time.

    I don't know how us mortals are even able to ride our bikes with our skinny chicken legs. Especially those guys that ride across France. I think they go pretty fast, but I'm not sure because I don't have a lawn mower to compare them to.

  19. #19
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    if the OP were going to be convinced, which it's pretty clear he is not...

    try taking a new bike chain, hanging it from something, then hang weights on it till it breaks.
    the answer is going to be north of 10,000#. Regardless of your size, regardless of the gear you're in, you aren't putting anywhere near the breaking load on the chain. not even 1/10th. Chains break because of side loading, side loading happens because of poor installation. If you side loaded your moto chain it would break too.

    if you want another fun experiment, try doing the same with a 10s chain and a single. You'll find the breaking strength about the same.

  20. #20
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    This almost as fun as the Jeep Bike thread.
    I crashed hard enough on my Tallboy to break my leg,
    The carbon is way more durable than most people.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley View Post
    There's so much bad logic/facts/math in here that I don't even know where to begin. In fact, I'm not even going to waste my time.

    I don't know how us mortals are even able to ride our bikes with our skinny chicken legs. Especially those guys that ride across France. I think they go pretty fast, but I'm not sure because I don't have a lawn mower to compare them to.

    What I am saying is I am getting old and I have given up riding my custom made Cr 500's. I am riding a bike and enjoy it but it sucks for speed compared to my old dirt bike. YES LEGS SUCK and are slower than chit!

    My 72 Super Z ROCKS! we would run it down the road or where ever beside the bike to get an idea how fast I am averaging. It's will mow at 15, it's a real cool lawnmower. The new Super Z will mow at 17.

    Don't get me wrong the bicycling is cool but I am used to real power and my ass doesn't have it.

  22. #22
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    They would say the same thing about the equipment in the gym and I would snap the chains on that stuff on a regular basis.

    I am back in the gym now after a 3 year leave and I think I am over the hill for sure. I hurt my self the other day.

    Messed one of my titties up doing curls, grabbed a 50 and started curling it after not working out for all that time and my little girly chest could not take it.

  23. #23
    Oh, the huge-meh-nity
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    I feel your pain, I shred chains too, but I know I'm the fastest when I shift into the two smallest gears--I mean, they're the lightest, so they HAVE to be the fastest. DUH!

  24. #24
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    Bad logic or not, weight does factor into it. Its 300 lbs standing on a 175mm lever, that equals torque to the rear end. Now add muscle power and that torque gets even higher.

    I agree with the side loading comment but the fact that the torque is so much more than a typical rider, the drivetrain is much more sensitive to small misalignments that a small guy wouldn't have to worry about.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    try taking a new bike chain, hanging it from something, then hang weights on it till it breaks.
    the answer is going to be north of 10,000#. Regardless of your size, regardless of the gear you're in, you aren't putting anywhere near the breaking load on the chain. not even 1/10th. Chains break because of side loading, side loading happens because of poor installation. If you side loaded your moto chain it would break too.
    OP, the above post is 100% true.

    The ONLY time I've seen people break a chain is during cross cassette shifting during a heavy climb without laying off a second to move gears.
    My EBB so loud
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