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  1. #1
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    Best chain and gears for torqueing is there a market ?

    I posted this about 2 years ago and the replies were limited, I have problems snapping chains when I stand up and torque in top gear.

    Who makes the truly best chains or am I better off just using mid grade chains and putting a new one on every month or 2.

    I would think for big strong guy's there would be a market for like a 6 speed cassette that is bigger and beefier with a heavy duty ring gear and a little bigger chain size like on how they do motorcycles?

    I am afraid to stand up and torque in top gear because I am afraid of getting hurt when the chain snaps.

    Thanks for insight.

  2. #2
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    How about not standing while in top gear? If your purpose is to gain more speed, select a lower gear and speed up, then go to top gear

  3. #3
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    That is a reply you would expect from a girl.

  4. #4
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    It's just a fact of life...depending on your size/power, you're going to break stuff if you try to muscle everything. That said, SRAM's 991 CrossStep chain has been the strongest I've used, if you're running 9 spd.

  5. #5
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    Thanks, they really don't make the options like they do in motorcycles. I would think they could make a little heavier setup just a touch and it would sell.

    When I hit hills I am getting to the point where I do not want to down shift and just want to stand up and mash. I just changed my cassette and put a new chain on. I snapped a chain last week.

    I am real scared to stand up and mash and apply full strenght because of this.

    For a big strong guy they should make better drive components even if it is a limited market, on my CR 500 it was like add stiff springs and do a revalve to the susoension with an extra clutch plate and heavy clutch springs and you were there.

  6. #6
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    I've only snapped one chain, but I've torn up cassettes. (see my thread on that) I am a very fit and strong guy, but I've resigned to the fact that I have to learn to sit and spin in order to save my equipment.So far my time hasn't suffered, and my cardio is getting a lot better. :-)

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  7. #7
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    It slows me down on hills to sit down and I can never accelerate the way I want in tall gears because I have snapped a chain before and busted my a$$ bad.

  8. #8
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    You wouldn't ride a motorbike like that. If you rode up a hill on a motorbike and just gave it a big helping of throttle, you'd possibly just slow and stall. You'd change down a gear or two then give it some beans. Same on a bike. Wippermann chains seem to come out best in tests but the straight load needed to snap an average 10 speed bike chain is about 2000lbs.
    Take the advice and learn to use the gears to your best advantage. I doubt you ride everywhere spinning out in top gear so stop stamping and work smarter instead of harder. That or fund your new invention!

  9. #9
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    I did not have to downshift my CR 500 and you got good life out of a good chain, the motorcycle never hurt me when it snapped a chain but the bike has.

    I just play ride and have snapped 3 or 4, I ride top gear 80 to 90% of the time and FL is flat. I go faster up a grade by standing and mashing and not downshifting.

    I trust a new chain for about a month of mashing then I will not stand and mash any more. POP! and me almost going over the bars. I hurt my knee good once because of this.
    They should sell a heavier setup not much just a little.

  10. #10
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    What bike are you riding and what are the gears on it? What chains are you using?

  11. #11
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    Sounds more like poor installation than defective chains to me.

    Most 3/32 chains we use are stronger than 1/8 chains these guys use:



    Just get the chain properly installed instead of thinking you're stronger than you really are. Your legs aren't snapping chains, it's the mechanic.

  12. #12
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    An NFL style clyde who weighs 300 pounds plus mashing and is strong will put way more abuse on a chain than that guy.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooTallUK View Post
    What bike are you riding and what are the gears on it? What chains are you using?
    Right now I am running a RH 23 inch with MTX's 33 29's and 46 11 tooth gearing, 90% of the time I am in 11 tooth and 46th tooth ring. I can pull this with no problem and will probably be going to a 50 shortly.

    What happens is the tight turn of the 11 tooth sprocket smokes the chains faster, no matter what chain I have used so far they get smoked quick. I have run 50$ chains and popped them. I think I need to go to a 50 + tooth ring so I can get off the bottom sprocket to keep from burning the chains up'

    I street ride and throw in off road obstacles at high speed, after riding my CR 500 for 25 years the bike is like slow motion so I try and spice it up the best I can.

  14. #14
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    Just so you know - with 26" wheels, a terribly slow 60rpm cadence and 11:46 gearing, you'd be averaging just under 18 mph. If you were up to a more normal 90rpm, that would see a speed of over 26mph.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    An NFL style clyde who weighs 300 pounds plus mashing and is strong will put way more abuse on a chain than that guy.
    It's not about weight, it's about power. That guy puts down WAY more power than you, or me, or any of the rest of the guys on this forum.

    That's Robert Forstemann. He squats 600lbs. And his bike is geared higher than yours.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley View Post
    It's not about weight, it's about power. That guy puts down WAY more power than you, or me, or any of the rest of the guys on this forum.

    That's Robert Forstemann. He squats 600lbs. And his bike is geared higher than yours.
    Power? legs are a joke, Now 65 HP at 6000 RPM in a 225 pound package is a OK running set of legs on a off road bike.

    I have trimmed down and I am now 280. I have 30 more to go. I was up to 325 playing around in the gym, that guy has a much shorter stroke. I had guys in the gym who could squat 600 pounds and there were things in the gym I could do with my legs they had problems with and could not do. Most of the reason was because my knees were twice their size.



    That guy moves 600 pounds but it is over short distance, HP is the amount of work you do moving weight over a distance and in what amount of time. I do not know who that guy is but a 300 pound or 350 pound clyde mashing the petal with full force of all their weight will put more force on the chain than a 200 pound guy with short legs.

    Some of your NFL lineman are going to be able to squat 600 pounds with no problem. I was able to pick 500 pounds up with my shoulders on a Smith Machine with no problem playing around in the gym with my legs. So lifting 600 pounds with your legs is not really that big of a deal now mastering a squat to be able to do it takes more effort and technic.

    When the smaller guy mashes the bike will go forward and not put as much torque on the chain because he is much lighter, the heavier guy has his weight stretching the chain as well as his power stroke. Not only that he's jumping on the chain with a lot more weight.

    If you were to take a NFL style lineman and your guy and measure the force exerted on the chain you would see the strong 325 pounder is applying easily more force to the chain because of all his extra weight plus the longer stroke.

    I ride a 2xl and have the seat post 10 inches up and I am jumping on the chain from that height, I need to get around to buying some 200mm cranks because I think it would help me allot.

    The lighter strong guy will go alot faster for sure but he is not exerting the force on a chain like a strong clyde does.

    One last thing I am hard on chains for whatever reason, I used to break chains on the gym equipment all the time in the gym.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooTallUK View Post
    Just so you know - with 26" wheels, a terribly slow 60rpm cadence and 11:46 gearing, you'd be averaging just under 18 mph. If you were up to a more normal 90rpm, that would see a speed of over 26mph.
    Kulhavy won the 2012 Olympic Cross Country Mountain Bike race with an average speed of 14.2 mph.
    Your country needs you.
    I am not mountain biking, I have serious limitations being my size. I know this from MOTOX motorcycles. I road ride on my modified MTB and make my own trails along the way. I average in between 20 to 30 MPH, I think? I have a 15 MPH Super Z lawn mower and I am using that as a reference. It probably does not count.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    Power? legs are a joke, Now 65 HP at 6000 RPM in a 225 pound package is a OK running set of legs on a off road bike.

    I have trimmed down and I am now 280. I have 30 more to go. I was up to 325 playing around in the gym, that guy has a much shorter stroke. I had guys in the gym who could squat 600 pounds and there were things in the gym I could do with my legs they had problems with and could not do. Most of the reason was because my knees were twice their size.



    That guy moves 600 pounds but it is over short distance, HP is the amount of work you do moving weight over a distance and in what amount of time. I do not know who that guy is but a 300 pound or 350 pound clyde mashing the petal with full force of all their weight will put more force on the chain than a 200 pound guy with short legs.

    Some of your NFL lineman are going to be able to squat 600 pounds with no problem. I was able to pick 500 pounds up with my shoulders on a Smith Machine with no problem playing around in the gym with my legs. So lifting 600 pounds with your legs is not really that big of a deal now mastering a squat to be able to do it takes more effort and technic.

    When the smaller guy mashes the bike will go forward and not put as much torque on the chain because he is much lighter, the heavier guy has his weight stretching the chain as well as his power stroke. Not only that he's jumping on the chain with a lot more weight.

    If you were to take a NFL style lineman and your guy and measure the force exerted on the chain you would see the strong 325 pounder is applying easily more force to the chain because of all his extra weight plus the longer stroke.

    I ride a 2xl and have the seat post 10 inches up and I am jumping on the chain from that height, I need to get around to buying some 200mm cranks because I think it would help me allot.

    The lighter strong guy will go alot faster for sure but he is not exerting the force on a chain like a strong clyde does.

    One last thing I am hard on chains for whatever reason, I used to break chains on the gym equipment all the time in the gym.
    There's so much bad logic/facts/math in here that I don't even know where to begin. In fact, I'm not even going to waste my time.

    I don't know how us mortals are even able to ride our bikes with our skinny chicken legs. Especially those guys that ride across France. I think they go pretty fast, but I'm not sure because I don't have a lawn mower to compare them to.
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  19. #19
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    if the OP were going to be convinced, which it's pretty clear he is not...

    try taking a new bike chain, hanging it from something, then hang weights on it till it breaks.
    the answer is going to be north of 10,000#. Regardless of your size, regardless of the gear you're in, you aren't putting anywhere near the breaking load on the chain. not even 1/10th. Chains break because of side loading, side loading happens because of poor installation. If you side loaded your moto chain it would break too.

    if you want another fun experiment, try doing the same with a 10s chain and a single. You'll find the breaking strength about the same.

  20. #20
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    This almost as fun as the Jeep Bike thread.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley View Post
    There's so much bad logic/facts/math in here that I don't even know where to begin. In fact, I'm not even going to waste my time.

    I don't know how us mortals are even able to ride our bikes with our skinny chicken legs. Especially those guys that ride across France. I think they go pretty fast, but I'm not sure because I don't have a lawn mower to compare them to.

    What I am saying is I am getting old and I have given up riding my custom made Cr 500's. I am riding a bike and enjoy it but it sucks for speed compared to my old dirt bike. YES LEGS SUCK and are slower than chit!

    My 72 Super Z ROCKS! we would run it down the road or where ever beside the bike to get an idea how fast I am averaging. It's will mow at 15, it's a real cool lawnmower. The new Super Z will mow at 17.

    Don't get me wrong the bicycling is cool but I am used to real power and my ass doesn't have it.

  22. #22
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    They would say the same thing about the equipment in the gym and I would snap the chains on that stuff on a regular basis.

    I am back in the gym now after a 3 year leave and I think I am over the hill for sure. I hurt my self the other day.

    Messed one of my titties up doing curls, grabbed a 50 and started curling it after not working out for all that time and my little girly chest could not take it.

  23. #23
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    I feel your pain, I shred chains too, but I know I'm the fastest when I shift into the two smallest gears--I mean, they're the lightest, so they HAVE to be the fastest. DUH!

  24. #24
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    Bad logic or not, weight does factor into it. Its 300 lbs standing on a 175mm lever, that equals torque to the rear end. Now add muscle power and that torque gets even higher.

    I agree with the side loading comment but the fact that the torque is so much more than a typical rider, the drivetrain is much more sensitive to small misalignments that a small guy wouldn't have to worry about.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    try taking a new bike chain, hanging it from something, then hang weights on it till it breaks.
    the answer is going to be north of 10,000#. Regardless of your size, regardless of the gear you're in, you aren't putting anywhere near the breaking load on the chain. not even 1/10th. Chains break because of side loading, side loading happens because of poor installation. If you side loaded your moto chain it would break too.
    OP, the above post is 100% true.

    The ONLY time I've seen people break a chain is during cross cassette shifting during a heavy climb without laying off a second to move gears.

  26. #26
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    Even with 300 lbs on a 175 mm lever and a chainring half that radius (doubling the torque) and the rider mashing down full strength is not enough to break a properly installed chain.

    Just get it installed properly, run the chain as straight as possible when you mash and you're golden.

    Saddle height has nothing to do with the amount of force you put on the chain when you mash. If anything, the torque at "cranks vertical" is smaller when the saddle is high, because the fulcrum is further away.

  27. #27
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    If I ride hard everyday 15 to 20 miles I can burn a chain and sprocket every month, what happens is because I am in the 11th sprocket mostly it hooks it then stretches the chain and the chain pops.

    It was the same thing on MY cr500, the front sprocket hooks then it would trash the chain then when the chain was stretched it would ride on top the rear sprocket teeth and bend them and destroy the whole setup pre maturely.

    If I change the 11th tooth sprocket out before it starts wearing the chain out it may save chain life.

    I am down right now, I crashed the other day and cracked some ribs and did not know it then went to the gym and messed myself up by lifting weight with banged up ribs.

    My whole rib cage on one side practically collapsed on one side while curling 50 pound dumbbells and I could not figure out at the time it was from a crash earlier in the week on the bicycle.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sasquatch1413 View Post
    Bad logic or not, weight does factor into it. Its 300 lbs standing on a 175mm lever, that equals torque to the rear end. Now add muscle power and that torque gets even higher.

    I agree with the side loading comment but the fact that the torque is so much more than a typical rider, the drivetrain is much more sensitive to small misalignments that a small guy wouldn't have to worry about.
    Sasquatch knows, he is probably 10 times stronger than any man will ever be!

  29. #29
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    I don't normally jump into melees such as this...

    But I also am 5'11" and bring 280 to the party. I can leg press more than 500 pounds in one shot and regularly do reps of 280. I have never broken a chain. My problem with my bikes is not keeping the drive line clean. I ride a lot of sandy soil and this can be problematic. On my 2010 Giant I have changed the chain 4 times, the rear cassette once and recently the whole friggin crank and bb!
    Other than the chains, the cassette removed last fall was the stock model. The same with the cranks last week. The bb was changed to accommodate the new cranks.
    Opinions on a lot of stock components (especially on entry level area bikes) is that it is adequate. Get a guy like me on a bike and there will be wear.
    I have to wonder, aside from possibly cross chaining, does shifting under a huge load or at, um, inopportune times come into play here too? I know a few guys, half my weight that can break any chain withing a years time. It has to also come from not only installation, but riding and shifting habits as well as maintenance of these components too. Every chain on the market cannot suck... BTW, I am more than pleased with the mid tier Shimano chains..
    Just my 2 cents..take it for what it is worth...
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  30. #30
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    Shifting under a load will snap a chain with no problem, I destroyed a 50$ chain doing this.

  31. #31
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    The other day I just snapped my Suntour arm off the crank so poowee on you people who say the drive trains are strong enough.

  32. #32
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    I was getting massive amounts of pinch flats for a few weeks. I found the mechanical reason and fixed it. It was not because i was big. My bike was making some crazy creaks when i torqued. I found the mechanical reason and fixed it. It was not because i was big.

    You say your chest and ribs went out on you while curling. What kind of freaking flailing poor form are you using that curling a dumbbell hurt your chest!? To me that said a lot about how you are riding. "I dont down shift, its faster to mash" goes hand in hand with "I dont curl what my biceps can lift, i go 20 lbs heavier and spaz my torso to get the weight up". Isolate the muscle; use proper form and weight and even a broken rib wont do more than twinge a bit. Using the correct gear and cadence will maintain your speed and power output with out jacking your equipment up.

    You have gotten advice from other big men in this thread on how to NOT break your chain. You have chosen to ignore that advice. Your issue is either mechanical or technique, not the torque you and most people on this sub forum are able to put out.

    Let me leave you with this gem....

    The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which unskilled individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly rating their ability much higher than average. This bias is attributed to a metacognitive inability of the unskilled to recognize their mistakes.

    Actual competence may weaken self-confidence, as competent individuals may falsely assume that others have an equivalent understanding. David Dunning and Justin Kruger of Cornell University conclude, "the miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others".

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRingGrinder View Post
    I was getting massive amounts of pinch flats for a few weeks. I found the mechanical reason and fixed it. It was not because i was big. My bike was making some crazy creaks when i torqued. I found the mechanical reason and fixed it. It was not because i was big.

    You say your chest and ribs went out on you while curling. What kind of freaking flailing poor form are you using that curling a dumbbell hurt your chest!? To me that said a lot about how you are riding. "I dont down shift, its faster to mash" goes hand in hand with "I dont curl what my biceps can lift, i go 20 lbs heavier and spaz my torso to get the weight up". Isolate the muscle; use proper form and weight and even a broken rib wont do more than twinge a bit. Using the correct gear and cadence will maintain your speed and power output with out jacking your equipment up.

    You have gotten advice from other big men in this thread on how to NOT break your chain. You have chosen to ignore that advice. Your issue is either mechanical or technique, not the torque you and most people on this sub forum are able to put out.

    Let me leave you with this gem....

    The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which unskilled individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly rating their ability much higher than average. This bias is attributed to a metacognitive inability of the unskilled to recognize their mistakes.

    Actual competence may weaken self-confidence, as competent individuals may falsely assume that others have an equivalent understanding. David Dunning and Justin Kruger of Cornell University conclude, "the miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others".
    I had problems curling in the gym because I broke my ribs on the bike when I crashed and did not realize it until I went to the gym and starting doing curls with 50 pounds.

    My cranks developed a small crack in the middle and over time just snapped from flexing, aluminum does break with fatigue over time flexing. I go through drive stuff and I need to get a good setup because I can get hurt with this stuff breaking when it lets go.

    I have no problem pulling the gearing, I am going up from 46 11 to like 53 12 or 11 to get to the next level of leg strength, I only have to down shift on steep grades other than that I stand and mash.

    I am getting to the point where I stand a lot more with no problem getting tired when mashing so I am happy with my progress just want to get a drive train I can trust not to break.
    Last edited by Realslowww; 11-24-2013 at 03:38 PM.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I am getting to the point where I stand a lot more with no problem getting tired when mashing so I am happy with my progress just want to get a drive train I can trust not to break.
    All you have to do is learn to maintain it properly, or get someone else to.

    Complaining isn't going to help.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zowie View Post
    All you have to do is learn to maintain it properly, or get someone else to.

    Complaining isn't going to help.
    I talked with the place that sold me the bike, the cranks can break. I ordered some better cranks and I will be changing my chain out and gears on a regular basis so I quit snapping chains.

    On hills when I stand and mash is when the problems happens, last chain I broke was doing this and the arm snapping as well. I will be going along at about 5 or 10 MPH and a hill will come up and I stand and mash and the drive train breaks.

    It always happens when I apply full power, if I just power up slowly and not accelerate as hard I usually do not have problems. I have been in the gym and my legs are getting stronger again and pulling that gearing all the time is no problem now.

  36. #36
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    You've refused to change the way you ride so you'll keep trashing stuff. Given your refusal to change gears I recommend you convert to single speed. The heavier chain and inability for you to screw the chain line up by mashing in the wrong gears will reduce you breaking things so often.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooTallUK View Post
    You've refused to change the way you ride so you'll keep trashing stuff. Given your refusal to change gears I recommend you convert to single speed. The heavier chain and inability for you to screw the chain line up by mashing in the wrong gears will reduce you breaking things so often.
    I was not aware single speed uses a heavier chain, can I change my 9 cassette to like 5 and run a bigger chain? I do shift but only when I have to. When BIG hills come up I really shift down. It is just my legs are getting stout and I rarely have to shift now and I am breaking the drive about every other month.

    I want to be able to apply full torque and with good cranks and changing the chain like once a month or every other month should solve the problem. The chain did not snap this time the crank broke.

    Last time I applied full torque on a hill the chain broke, I generally do not apply full power instantly because of this reason. This stuff does wear and needs to be changed out regularly if you put a good load on it.

    Single speed will not work for me, sometimes I need gears.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I will be going along at about 5 or 10 MPH and a hill will come up and I stand and mash and the drive train breaks.
    I thought you always went 20 - 30 LMPH (lawn mowers per hour).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I will be going along at about 5 or 10 MPH and a hill will come up and I stand and mash and the drive train breaks.
    You have no business being in the 11T cassette sprocket at that speed.

    If for some reason you feel the need to do that (which would be like going 10mph in 6th gear in your car), and the chain breaks, it was installed wrong or something else is mechanically wrong. You didn't break it because you are too strong. You bring narcissism to a whole new level if you think your strength broke it.

  40. #40
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    I'm just in awe of the OP's power, stamina, and riding prowess. To think that in 15 years of riding, weighing as much as 265#, and what I've always thought were pretty strong legs, I've never developed the power to break even a single chain, let alone numerous chains. I really need to pick it up!

    Good luck OP!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    You have no business being in the 11T cassette sprocket at that speed.

    If for some reason you feel the need to do that (which would be like going 10mph in 6th gear in your car), and the chain breaks, it was installed wrong or something else is mechanically wrong. You didn't break it because you are too strong. You bring narcissism to a whole new level if you think your strength broke it.
    I put the bike on a bench at the local shop about every month or 2 and they go over it and adjust it, I am going to be blunt, My Cr 500's would kick my a$$ and never fail unless I did something stupid! My MTB is flimsy in comparison, you act like this is a big. IT IS NOT!

    If I can leave my CR 500 in 5th and shread a berm and not shift at low speed and never have a problem why can't I do it on my bicycle?

    They need to step up and make these things more like the motor bike counterparts, I know weight is a problem when dealing with cheesy girly human legs but I am not impressed with the build quality of the drive on my bicycle.

    These bicycles compared to a modern MX motorcycle are spindly to say the least, they are now making them better however but they should make a slightly better chain setup for people who have more output than average.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post

    If I can leave my CR 500 in 5th and shread a berm and not shift at low speed and never have a problem why can't I do it on my bicycle?
    It's called "chain line", and learning about it would save you and everyone else time...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zowie View Post
    It's called "chain line", and learning about it would save you and everyone else time...
    When my cranks arrive I will have the local bike shop look at it, if there was a problem I believe they would have said something when checking my bike out. If I run the chain on the big ring and the small sprocket how do you change the line to where it makes less stress.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tystevens View Post
    I'm just in awe of the OP's power, stamina, and riding prowess. To think that in 15 years of riding, weighing as much as 265#, and what I've always thought were pretty strong legs, I've never developed the power to break even a single chain, let alone numerous chains. I really need to pick it up!

    Good luck OP!
    I think it is the way I run the 11 tooth all the time is stretching and wearing the chain out. I am road riding so pulling that gear is no problem, on a trail specially in FL with sand no way I could pull that.

    These chains in the right circumstance are not that hard to break.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    If I run the chain on the big ring and the small sprocket how do you change the line to where it makes less stress.
    Switch the big chainring to a larger size so you'll have the same overall ratio on a larger cog, which is closer to a straight chainline.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    Switch the big chainring to a larger size so you'll have the same overall ratio on a larger cog, which is closer to a straight chainline.
    Thanks. Will do, I am going to 53 12 n 13 to try and fix my problem. I am not trying to make a big deal out of this. I can get hurt when this happens all the time. I got old creaky joints from to much CR 500 action and I have to watch it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I put the bike on a bench at the local shop about every month or 2 and they go over it and adjust it, I am going to be blunt, My Cr 500's would kick my a$$ and never fail unless I did something stupid! My MTB is flimsy in comparison, you act like this is a big. IT IS NOT!

    If I can leave my CR 500 in 5th and shread a berm and not shift at low speed and never have a problem why can't I do it on my bicycle?

    They need to step up and make these things more like the motor bike counterparts, I know weight is a problem when dealing with cheesy girly human legs but I am not impressed with the build quality of the drive on my bicycle.

    These bicycles compared to a modern MX motorcycle are spindly to say the least, they are now making them better however but they should make a slightly better chain setup for people who have more output than average.
    I'm not trying to be rude but nobody cares about your motorcycle dude, it has zero relevance to the topic. What you're doing would be equivalent to complaining that your Bob The Builder play set hammer can't break concrete the way your jackhammer can.

    You would have a cadence of about 10 when you're in that gear combination at 5-10mph, which is FAR from efficient.

    Your output isn't above average, you are abusing your equipment. I can squat over 500lbs and deadlift over 600 and the only time I've ever broken a chain is when shifting under high load before learning proper pedaling technique. Point being, you're doing it wrong and if you respond with anything other than "thanks for the tip, I'll fix my incorrect riding style", you are ignorant.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    I'm not trying to be rude but nobody cares about your motorcycle dude, it has zero relevance to the topic. What you're doing would be equivalent to complaining that your Bob The Builder play set hammer can't break concrete the way your jackhammer can.

    You would have a cadence of about 10 when you're in that gear combination at 5-10mph, which is FAR from efficient.

    Your output isn't above average, you are abusing your equipment. I can squat over 500lbs and deadlift over 600 and the only time I've ever broken a chain is when shifting under high load before learning proper pedaling technique. Point being, you're doing it wrong and if you respond with anything other than "thanks for the tip, I'll fix my incorrect riding style", you are ignorant.
    So what do you tell the single speed crowd? I do shift but only when I have to. Same on my CR 500 and the equipment never complained.

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    I'm taking a power cookie out on my next ride. I better make sure I drop a couple of extra chains in my camelbak too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pablobell View Post
    I'm taking a power cookie out on my next ride. I better make sure I drop a couple of extra chains in my camelbak too.
    I don't run more than 20 or 25 miles a day so I could use lots of power cookies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    So what do you tell the single speed crowd? I do shift but only when I have to. Same on my CR 500 and the equipment never complained.


    I've thrown chains due to frame flex, but never have broken one.

    I saw a dude snap a chain climbing fixed...but he's a pro now, and to be frank - an alien (he tore a bike in half climbing once).

    Oh...I'm a SS'er. damn near impossible to snap a chain unless it's bad chain line, bad chain....or you're an alien.

    you're not an alien.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    So what do you tell the single speed crowd? I do shift but only when I have to. Same on my CR 500 and the equipment never complained.
    The single speed crowd doesn't use that absurd gear combination. They pick something reasonable that is well rounded. That gear combination would ONLY be used on downhills when used properly, much less up hill at 5mph.

    Also, mountain bikes need to be light so the parts are inherently weaker. You CAN bog the engine of your car/motorcycle and it might not cause issues in the short term, doesn't mean that it's good for it.

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    I just need to replace the chain more often and look after the drive, as stated running a chin on 11 t can wear it out faster and pulling such a tall gear. I need to work on getting my cadence correct then work form there.

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    Once again, you are using the wrong gear.

    I have NEVER used the 11T cog in the rear and my biggest chainring is 38T.

    You should be in like the 24T at that speed on your middle chain ring of a 3x setup or your big one on a 2x. With a 53T that I think you mentioned earlier (why is that on a mountain bike? That's a road size. Unless this is about your road bike), you could be in the 32-36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    So what do you tell the single speed crowd? I do shift but only when I have to. Same on my CR 500 and the equipment never complained.
    A motorcycle chainline doesn't change when you shift. That's why there's no wrong gear from the perspective of the chain.
    Same with singlespeeds: the chainline is straight (provided the bike is built properly) and doesn't change no matter what you do.

    With a cassette changing gears (cogs) alters the chainline in the rear. Using small cogs off the front chainline stresses the chain. Simple as that.

    Switching to a larger chainring helps in two ways: you'll use a larger cog (closer to chainline), but the larger chainring in itself reduces chain stress because of increased diameter. Imagine a chainring with a radius of 175 mm (same as cranks), whatever force you put down on the pedals will be 1:1 the same as the force pulling the chain. But if you use a chainring half that size, the force pulling the chain will be doubled.

    If you really want to ride the way you do, a bike can be made to your needs. But it requires a different setup than most use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    A motorcycle chainline doesn't change when you shift. That's why there's no wrong gear from the perspective of the chain.
    Same with singlespeeds: the chainline is straight (provided the bike is built properly) and doesn't change no matter what you do.

    With a cassette changing gears (cogs) alters the chainline in the rear. Using small cogs off the front chainline stresses the chain. Simple as that.

    Switching to a larger chainring helps in two ways: you'll use a larger cog (closer to chainline), but the larger chainring in itself reduces chain stress because of increased diameter. Imagine a chainring with a radius of 175 mm (same as cranks), whatever force you put down on the pedals will be 1:1 the same as the force pulling the chain. But if you use a chainring half that size, the force pulling the chain will be doubled.

    If you really want to ride the way you do, a bike can be made to your needs. But it requires a different setup than most use.
    Don't encourage him. Using a 53T chain ring with the 11T rear cog should be reserved for 35+mph on flat or downhill, not 5-10mph uphill.

    I'm really curious what the rationalization is to use the highest gear combination available at such a slow speed... what do you do when you're going faster? When cycling the goal is to maintain a consistent cadence among all speeds, that is efficiency. Be it 60rpm, 90rpm, or 110rpm, you should be close to what works for you regardless of your speed. This means that you should constantly be shifting as the terrain and your speed changes. Your car (if it's an automatic) will constantly shift, and an engine has a much wider range of speed that is usable for each gear than a bicycle does, that's why bikes have 20-30 gears usually, while cars have 5-7.

    Think of it like your car/motorcycle... you start out in 1st gear going slow, and shift up from there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    Don't encourage him. Using a 53T chain ring with the 11T rear cog should be reserved for 35+mph on flat or downhill, not 5-10mph uphill.

    I'm really curious what the rationalization is to use the highest gear combination available at such a slow speed... what do you do when you're going faster? When cycling the goal is to maintain a consistent cadence among all speeds, that is efficiency. Be it 60rpm, 90rpm, or 110rpm, you should be close to what works for you regardless of your speed. This means that you should constantly be shifting as the terrain and your speed changes. Your car (if it's an automatic) will constantly shift, and an engine has a much wider range of speed that is usable for each gear than a bicycle does, that's why bikes have 20-30 gears usually, while cars have 5-7.

    Think of it like your car/motorcycle... you start out in 1st gear going slow, and shift up from there.
    I was posting on another site and I have come to the conclusion the way I am doing it is wrong, I need to work on my cadence. I will run a 53 12 and that should be good when on flat ground hauling but I need to learn to shift more even tough my legs can pull it it is not good for my knees to do that all the time.

    I want to build leg strength but need to do it correctly and down shift more. My legs have no problem creeping along at 5 MPH going up a hill turning very little RPM but it does not make it the right thing to do to go to the next level of strength and endurance.

    My cadence will probably not be 90 like it should probably in the low 80's or high 70's would be good. I think my legs make a good bit more torque than most people so I make HP early without spinning but I need to learn to spin more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I was posting on another site and I have come to the conclusion the way I am doing it is wrong, I need to work on my cadence. I will run a 53 12 and that should be good when on flat ground hauling but I need to learn to shift more even tough my legs can pull it it is not good for my knees to do that all the time.

    I want to build leg strength but need to do it correctly and down shift more. My legs have no problem creeping along at 5 MPH going up a hill turning very little RPM but it does not make it the right thing to do to go to the next level of strength and endurance.

    My cadence will probably not be 90 like it should probably in the low 80's or high 70's would be good. I thing my legs make a good bit more torque than most people si I make HP early without soinning but I need to learn to spin more.
    Just because you CAN make it up a hill in 53/11, doesn't make it the right thing to do.

    Check this website out: BikeCalc.com - Speed at all Cadences for any Gear and Wheel

    Assuming you have a 29er, at 53/11 you're going 33-41mph at 80-100rpm cadence.

    Point being, you have ZERO business using the HIGHEST GEAR THAT EXISTS when you are barely moving. Why is that so hard to grasp? Why do you think your bike comes with NINETEEN to TWENTY NINE gears (assuming 2x10 or 3x10) that are lower than the one you're in? What do you think they're for? Bikes usually go between 0 and 45mph tops, the highest one is for 40-45mph on flat or downhill, the lower ones are for speeds lower than that or climbing, plain and simple.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    Just because you CAN make it up a hill in 53/11, doesn't make it the right thing to do.

    Check this website out: BikeCalc.com - Speed at all Cadences for any Gear and Wheel

    Assuming you have a 29er, at 53/11 you're going 33-41mph at 80-100rpm cadence.

    Point being, you have ZERO business using the HIGHEST GEAR THAT EXISTS when you are barely moving. Why is that so hard to grasp? Why do you think your bike comes with NINETEEN to TWENTY NINE gears (assuming 2x10 or 3x10) that are lower than the one you're in? What do you think they're for? Bikes usually go between 0 and 45mph tops, the highest one is for 40-45mph on flat or downhill, the lower ones are for speeds lower than that or climbing, plain and simple.
    Some people ride single speed and enjoy it but I do not see how they can be competitive with a gear bike? what is the real purpose of single speed?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    Some people ride single speed and enjoy it but I do not see how they can be competitive with a gear bike? what is the real purpose of single speed?
    Single speeders ride chain rings in the high 30s/low 40s and high teens in the back, which using 38/19 as an example would result in DOUBLE the cadence of 53/11 at the same speed.

    The "purpose" of single speed is simplicity and lack of maintenance for the general public, but most of the people on here ride it because it's fun, more challenging, and weighs less.

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    Trollin, trollin, trollin,

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    Single speeders ride chain rings in the high 30s/low 40s and high teens in the back, which using 38/19 as an example would result in DOUBLE the cadence of 53/11 at the same speed.

    The "purpose" of single speed is simplicity and lack of maintenance for the general public, but most of the people on here ride it because it's fun, more challenging, and weighs less.
    Overall a single speed bike cannot keep up with a geared bike. I can see it but you have got to have gears to run your fastest. When I was a kid I had single speed, Here in FL for what I do I could live with a 3 speed but not a single. Sometimes I will hit a big hill and I really have to down shift and a lighter person smokes me on big hills because of my weight.

    It kinda shows pound for pound I am not as strong as a lighter person or there is no substitute for less weight?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirty $anchez View Post
    Trollin, trollin, trollin,
    Hey my ?'s are legitimate, so Happy Thanksgiving to you, you Jive talk'in TURKEY! Gooble gooble gooble.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    Overall a single speed bike cannot keep up with a geared bike. I can see it but you have got to have gears to run your fastest. When I was a kid I had single speed, Here in FL for what I do I could live with a 3 speed but not a single. Sometimes I will hit a big hill and I really have to down shift and a lighter person smokes me on big hills because of my weight.

    It kinda shows pound for pound I am not as strong as a lighter person or there is no substitute for less weight?
    Being fast isn't the point... I know some people who have gotten bored with riding and try to make it harder by riding rigid or single speed.

    Either way, you shouldn't even be using the top half of your cassette to climb, much less the highest cog that exists. Get your cadence WAY up and you'll be happier.

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    Ok,

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    I put it together with 53 13 gearing for max gear and 180 mm arms Octalink so it should help I hope, Thanks for all the help.

    I had to change the bottom bracket from Octalink 2 to 1 to make it work and I hope 1 is strong.

    I could have boughten a new high quality crank for what this cost to make this used road bike crank work.

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    Wanted to add some experience here to help op without being harsh about it.

    I'm similar in build to u. 270lbs was 360 almost 2yrs ago when I got back into riding. Legs my whole life have been extremely strong. First bike I had last year was a 24speed (3x8) 26". I went through a chain every couple months month cause I'd pedal slower and use my strength in higher ratios instead. Then watching friends ride they spin insanely faster than I did. Learned the reasoning and that cadence matters much more than I realized. I started training to use less brute force and more pedaling rpm in its place. Helped in 2 ways. First was weight loss increased, could ride longer with less fatigue making me overall faster. Second way was wear and tear on my bikes. My cadence is around 75-80 but helped a lot. I still mash to compensate for my weight but it's maintain cadence just increase force to keep from constantly shifting on slight elevation changes. Bought my 29er last January converted to 2x10 and bought spare chain. Still on these 2 chains more than half life left in each. Simple kmc 10s chains. Small ring I use 1-6 rear, middle ring I run 2-8 never touch 9-10rear (13 & 11) unless on pavement cruising along.

    Now seems ur issue is beating up ur bike as physical conditioning is great. Bike companies make parts tough as long as u stay away from weight weenies stuff, but still aren't designed so tough as to deal with the forces us big guys can put down. Well not survive as long as they will for the n normal sized ppl. So key is to find a range that is just below max stress of parts before accelerating fatigue to rapid failure. Then keep forces exerted by u in that range by using lower gearing and less strength/more speed to keep it same pace.

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    I just went for a maiden voyage with the new crank, I learned alot. What I learned was you guy's who say I am running to tall of a gear what gives are you a bunch of girls or something?

    actually I know why the crank broke now, they were not strong enough and the creek I was hearing was the crank arm flexing and it broke over time. The new crank is much stiffer and I learned that a good crank makes a huge difference.

    It makes the bike much easier to pedal and I can even pull a bigger gear now. 53 13 is about right on flat ground and I had no problem pulling 53 11 but cannot do it right yet. I have a 12 to replace the 11 to work up to 11 if possible.

    I am running a Shimano 7700, I wonder if I go to a outboard bearing crank with even stiffer arms if it will help more. I am very happy and if you are heavy and have strong legs a good crank is a must.

    Should have updated when I bought the bike but good cranks are pricey.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    if you are heavy and have strong legs a good crank is a must.
    Almost as important as learning how to use gears and not treating your bike as a substitute for a squat machine. A combination of strength and technique will get you further, faster and with far less breakages than just mashing 'because you can'. The only loser in the way you've ridden your bike so far is you and the only winner is the man selling you components you've busted through bad technique.
    Now get out there and learn to spin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TooTallUK View Post
    Almost as important as learning how to use gears and not treating your bike as a substitute for a squat machine. A combination of strength and technique will get you further, faster and with far less breakages than just mashing 'because you can'. The only loser in the way you've ridden your bike so far is you and the only winner is the man selling you components you've busted through bad technique.
    Now get out there and learn to spin.
    Thanks 2 Tall, Hey Tall I hear the Illuminati is destroying your country with bad immigration laws and the natives are being driven out because the jobs are going to migrants?

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    Is it good to have a Over Drive so when you are on slight down grades to be able to really pick speed up and not run out of gear?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    Thanks 2 Tall, Hey Tall I hear the Illuminati is destroying your country with bad immigration laws and the natives are being driven out because the jobs are going to migrants?
    I wouldn't know. I'm an immigrant in the USA now. I hear a lot of people over here whining that the migrants are taking all the jobs as well. Same complaints, different country.

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    Where did your crank break?

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    I already posted where it broke, right above the BB.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    Switch the big chainring to a larger size so you'll have the same overall ratio on a larger cog, which is closer to a straight chainline.
    And since you need gears. Possibly run a 1X7 with short derailleur, wider DH front ring starting with a 48, and a "tight" chain length.

    Your power has nothing to do with your chain breaks. Mechanical alignment/tolerances. Condition/compatibility of components(drive train) as a group. And the twisting of the chain under torque from where and how you ride. Are the reasons for the breaks. IMHO

    I am not NFL stature. I am a big strong 275lb year round HT 29er rider. Winter Intervals for the next 2 months for my workouts. And I mainly ride urban assault, with single track when I can get out to them.
    I have stretched 4 chains. Killed the first 5 gears on 3 cassettes. And crushed the bearings of a GXP BB, and I mean crushed, running an X9 drivetrain (3X9). And all that just under the last year.

    Broke 1 chain in the last 7 years. And that was from twisting the chain when I powered down, going up hill, just as the chain was on both outer and middle rings. One side of one pin popped and a middle ring tooth broke.
    Bad shift on my part.

    I now run the 1X7 drive train mentioned above with a 46. Not even chain stretch for the last 2 months.

    EDIT- Had not even read rest of thread when I posted. Said my peace. Good luck to you.
    Last edited by Gear Head; 12-11-2013 at 05:16 PM.

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    I run my chain in the bottom 3 rear gears and only use the big outside chain ring on the crank, my problems have never been a misaligned setup. I check it now, if I try and go in the big gears in the rear that is when the chain is misaligned and will create a problem.

    For me and what I do if I can run it and make it work I need to probably run a 58 or 60 T front ring and start with like a 12 then 13 to 14 and then a major jump for tall hills like 24 n bigger on a 7 or 8 speed rear cassette.

    On 90% of my riding I can run 12 13 14 with a 60 T ring but when a big hill comes I need the big gears in back. Everything in the middle is a waste for me.

    FL is flat with an occasional steep incline.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I run my chain in the bottom 3 rear gears and only use the big outside chain ring on the crank, my problems have never been a misaligned setup. I check it now, if I try and go in the big gears in the rear that is when the chain is misaligned and will create a problem.

    For me and what I do if I can run it and make it work I need to probably run a 58 or 60 T front ring and start with like a 12 then 13 to 14 and then a major jump for tall hills like 24 n bigger on a 7 or 8 speed rear cassette.

    On 90% of my riding I can run 12 13 14 with a 60 T ring but when a big hill comes I need the big gears in back. Everything in the middle is a waste for me.

    FL is flat with an occasional steep incline.
    Are you talking about mountain biking or road biking?

    There is no way you are running 60T chainring and using 12-14 rear for anything but downhill. At an efficient cadence, you're going 35-45mph.

    We've already covered this... world class racers don't even go half that fast on cross country/trail offroad applications.

    Hell, Lance Armstrong (road bike--much faster than dirt) averages less than 30. You're trolling, wrong, or delusional.

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    This thread has me laughing, thanks! Vrooom Vroooooom! (Cr500)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    Are you talking about mountain biking or road biking?

    There is no way you are running 60T chainring and using 12-14 rear for anything but downhill. At an efficient cadence, you're going 35-45mph.

    We've already covered this... world class racers don't even go half that fast on cross country/trail offroad applications.

    Hell, Lance Armstrong (road bike--much faster than dirt) averages less than 30. You're trolling, wrong, or delusional.
    It's an odd thing I mix road with an occasional hill n trail for a short cut. I only ride 5 to 10 mile burst at a time with like full power. I am pulling 53 11 when conditions are right with no problem but only with no wind flat smooth ground.

    It is not MTB but high speed roading with short cuts and some light jumps. Like Super Moto bicycle style. It is my form of exercise transportation.

    So 58 12 should be good for me. I can pull off road 53 14 with no problem in flat areas of off road. I have to have big gears for big hills though.
    Last edited by Realslowww; 12-09-2013 at 06:24 AM.

  80. #80
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    Once again--you are doing it wrong.

    Lance Armstrong doesn't go fast enough to justify those gears and you aren't going anywhere near as fast as him.

    There's a reason most road bikes come with 50/11 or 53/11 as the biggest combo. Especially if you're mixing in dirt...

  81. #81
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    When conditions are right I am probably pulling 35 and on hills close to 40, but I am guessing. I go by weather I am making more MPH. If I put it in a taller gear and my MPH goes up then I do it if my MPH does not go up I down shift.

    If I lost 50 pounds I could probably run pro speed for a short distance, I am now just realizing I could have been a pro cyclist with no problem and probably a great one. My legs make a ton of torque for a wimpy human.

    The Cr 500 is so much more stout than my girly legs, if you turn the heat up on one of those motors you literally have a 2 speed racer. That is why I do not like to shift. I am used to my CR 500.

    My cadence is getting on target with the new cranks but as stated if I can gain MPH by running a taller gear I will. I can run 53 11 about 25% of the time and when conditions are right about 60% of the time.

    I do high speed road biking with trails and jumps and trust me it is fun. Coming off a Moto X Motorcycle I am used to going over torn up terrain at 60 plus MPH. In certain conditions I was as fast if not faster than some pros. My long legs allowed me to throw my a$$ over the rear fender and move over torn up whoops where a shorter person would get endowed over the bars.

    My bike has got to be set up right or it would kill me, old Chromo was the chit the new aluma tubes are not the same. The new generation of kids do not know this for the most part.

  82. #82
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    You are an amazing human.

  83. #83
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    I am not saying that, I never realized how strong I was until I went into the gym and within like 2 or 3 months of playing around I was like the strongest guy in the gym in like alot of ways.

    Not bench in stuff because that is all those guys do for like 25 years straight, Like on the hip abductor I can do 250, and I do 400 on leg extension and I am just playing around in the gym for a few months, I learned from Moto X what talent and hard is, I was the fastest 300 pound guy you would ever see practically but that is the hardest sport I know of.

    To go to the top of that requires so much talent and you have got to be light and agile. I just play rode off and on for years and now that I am getting older I want to get in shape and just realized I am like one of those NFL style genetic freaks who is alot stronger than most.

    I am only like 6 foot 5 but my frame is real athletic and real big boned, I am like over 280 and only about 15 % body fat and that is natural. I can go in the gym in about 3 or 4 months put on like 30 or 40 pounds of muscle.

    I never figured out I was gifted until I was about 45 so I am actually a pretty dumb person for sure!

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I am not saying that, I never realized how strong I was until I went into the gym and within like 2 or 3 months of playing around I was like the strongest guy in the gym in like alot of ways.
    cant.....

    resist......

    troll bait.........


    Dude, you hurt your chest curling. CURLING!!!!!!! Dont give me that BS about a broken rib you did not know you had. If you are putting stress on your chest at all YOU ARE DOING IT WRONG. Im glad you are so proud of your 50lb dumbbell curls but try something for me. Walk over to the wall next time and put your back against it before you do your set. Dont jerk, flail or spaz the weight up... raise the weight slow and controlled (like you are SUPPOSED to do). I bet you struggle to get one or two reps let alone a full set.

    You say you have broken cables (plural!!??) on gym equipment. The only way to manage this is if your "technique" is to jerk on the bar rather than lift in a controlled manner (the way you are SUPPOSED to). YOU ARE DOING IT WRONG!!!!

    You talk about manlyness, you call everyone who disagrees a girl. You do shit flat out wrong because you are so stuck on how "strong" you are. I dont even need to set foot in your gym to know you are THAT guy. The one who drops dumbells after sets. The one who does piss poor form on EVERY exercise you do. The one who bounces the bar off your chest for half a rep every bench press. The guy who does craptastic 1/2 rep sets of a weight you couldnt even budge with proper form then gives the guy next to you the "im stronger than you" look even though that guy is doing a higher % of his body weight with proper form. The guy every one in the gym laughs at with out even realizing it.

    I never figured out I was gifted until I was about 45 so I am actually a pretty dumb person for sure!
    Yea... you are gifted alright.

  85. #85
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    Realslowwww.......I was being sarcastic. I cannot believe you did not catch that. But then again, I can. BigRing is right on the money. It is great that you think that much of your abilities in everything you do. I would have loved to see a 300lb supercross rider become the champ. I would love to see the CR 500 that could hold your weight after landing an 80 ft triple. You would have parts sticking out of your arse.

    Daily... I would look at this thread of yours,(and the others) where you brag yourself up, sharing the talents that you have over everyone else on this site. Not taking the advise that all are giving you, and responding with your superhuman strength.

    I have one question.........How did you do that?

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I am not saying that, I never realized how strong I was until I went into the gym and within like 2 or 3 months of playing around I was like the strongest guy in the gym in like alot of ways.

    Not bench in stuff because that is all those guys do for like 25 years straight, Like on the hip abductor I can do 250, and I do 400 on leg extension and I am just playing around in the gym for a few months, I learned from Moto X what talent and hard is, I was the fastest 300 pound guy you would ever see practically but that is the hardest sport I know of.

    To go to the top of that requires so much talent and you have got to be light and agile. I just play rode off and on for years and now that I am getting older I want to get in shape and just realized I am like one of those NFL style genetic freaks who is alot stronger than most.

    I am only like 6 foot 5 but my frame is real athletic and real big boned, I am like over 280 and only about 15 % body fat and that is natural. I can go in the gym in about 3 or 4 months put on like 30 or 40 pounds of muscle.

    I never figured out I was gifted until I was about 45 so I am actually a pretty dumb person for sure!
    Seriously? You're quoting how strong you are on the abductor machine?

    How about squat to parallel or lower with good form? Deadlift? Proper form bench?

    The reason you are comparatively weak to the other guys on bench is because it's a harder motion to fake than some of the machines. How about a picture of you? Let's see what 6'5" 280 and 15% looks like. I was 6'6" 270 and 12% (in other words: more muscular) so I know what that looks like.

    I'm pretty sure you are just a troll and this whole thread is BS.

  87. #87
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    Cmon guys, stop giving fuel to the troll fire. There's no way this guy isn't trolling, no one is this stupid

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    I am telling you how it is, I know you were being sarcastic. I do not care. My technic in the gym could use improvement and I am working on it. Look the equipment in the gym never had a failure like that until I used it for whatever reason.

    You have got to realize I am an old man 49, it just took me this long to figure out I had certain gifts most people do not. In the gym core exercises I could do stuff nobody else could do some of them could bench over 500 pounds and they worked their legs and other parts as well.

    The owner of the gym told me he had never seen anybody get as strong as quick as me playing around. There was one guy who was supposed to be the strongest person anybody had ever seen work out at this gym. He went by the name Kerry, I never meet him but Bill Kazmier worked out at this gym and he was supposed to be considerably stronger than him and we know Bill is no slouch.

    I got up to 120's on the dumbbell's pressing with one arm and 70's on arm curls then quit working out for 3 years. Their are a lot of people who are stronger than me but very few who have worked out as little as me and at my age.

    I would have made a great road cyclist, off road Moto X to big and probably not talented enough at all. That is the hardest sport I have ever seen or one of them. Off road biking the same thing to big but road cycling with training I would have been great at it but parked the bicycle for the Moto X motorcycle and I have some injuries that are affecting me in the gym for sure.

    I am basically a white guy built like a black guy accept for you know where I got a little cheated.

    I am learning technic now in the gym.

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    Seriously? You're quoting how strong you are on the abductor machine?

    How about squat to parallel or lower with good form? Deadlift? Proper form bench?

    The reason you are comparatively weak to the other guys on bench is because it's a harder motion to fake than some of the machines. How about a picture of you? Let's see what 6'5" 280 and 15% looks like. I was 6'6" 270 and 12% (in other words: more muscular) so I know what that looks like.

    I'm pretty sure you are just a troll and this whole thread is BS.
    I am probably more like 20% body fat, I was 25% when I was 325 at my strongest. 270 and 12% is awesome that is what I want to be. All my weight goes to me gut the rest of me is not fat, I got 30 to 35 pounds of fat around my stomach and I cannot get rid of it so I am riding the bike trying to get rid of it.

    I am tired of being fat! I hope you get back to your target health.

    I am just know learning to squat correctly, you can screw your back up doing that so I never really pursued it much.

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bdabike View Post
    Realslowwww.......I was being sarcastic. I cannot believe you did not catch that. But then again, I can. BigRing is right on the money. It is great that you think that much of your abilities in everything you do. I would have loved to see a 300lb supercross rider become the champ. I would love to see the CR 500 that could hold your weight after landing an 80 ft triple. You would have parts sticking out of your arse.

    Daily... I would look at this thread of yours,(and the others) where you brag yourself up, sharing the talents that you have over everyone else on this site. Not taking the advise that all are giving you, and responding with your superhuman strength.

    I have one question.........How did you do that?
    I know my limitations because of my size on a bike, I was a good ground hog on a motorcycle and could eat torn up terrain good because of my build but a smaller lighter guy would smoke me because I cannot change direction fast enough at my weight.

    My problem with my cadence was my cranks on my bike 100%. I can now find the right gear to get my peddling straightened out.

    I appreciate all the help but the riding style I do is different than what most do and I am real happy with what I built. I think they should build a bike on this concept.

    I am not saying I am that strong just twice as strong as your normal guy in the legs and stuff and I seem to be able to break chains as weather in the gym or biking.

    I could also do tricep presses that nobody in the gym could do, I have 19 inch arms and some of these guys had 24 inch guns and they could not work out with a straight 190 pounds doing tri presses for reps like I could..

  91. #91
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    LOL, you are too much.

    Until you post a picture of yourself, holding a sign with today's date on it, I cannot believe that such a human exists.

  92. #92
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    And a shoe. Just one.

  93. #93
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    And one of those red clown noses.

  94. #94
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    While flexing... oh wait, wouldn't want you to rip your shirt

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bdabike View Post
    Realslowwww..

    I have one question.........How did you do that?
    No, how did you grow those ears on your d!ck head?

  96. #96
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    Shoot yourself with a Go Pro. Be sure to include side action views from riding buddy. Post to You Tube.
    Use the film to sell the "idea" of the ultimate clydesdale to bike component manufacturers. Become product tester and possible face for product line. Make first Million.

    IF you are that powerful. Something resembling the cross of a Rhino and a Gorilla... Then you got it made. If your not too ugly.

    Deal with drive train "weakness", change your out-loud voice, and listen.
    Last edited by Gear Head; 12-12-2013 at 07:05 AM.

  97. #97
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    Actually I appreciate all the help, I am able to use the advise now because the cranks fixed my problem and there will be no more chain breaking or problems. Some how the stock 175 MM cranks were not working for me at all. All the gearing and torqueing problems are gone.

    I learned big time if you are big and strong you have got to have the right cranks for your bike to get max power. I do not have to stand and mash anymore, I need to post some pics. Thanks all.

  98. #98
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    You won't have these problems when you get older.
    Just bear with yourself and let time take it's course.
    Be glad now for your strength...you will have many happy memories one day.
    Best wishes to you.
    Z
    roccowt.
    rocnbikemeld

  99. #99
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    That is basically where I am at, just an old dog wishing should of could of before you put it out to pasture or put a cap in it's a$$.

    I am back in the gym because I can see at 50 something happens that is not good so I am on a diet and exercising but I should probably keep my body fat up for when the Illuminati completely crashes the country.

  100. #100
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    Realslowwww-You are that dude who just keeps on winning.
    Keep up the awesomeness.

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