Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 100
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535

    Best chain and gears for torqueing is there a market ?

    I posted this about 2 years ago and the replies were limited, I have problems snapping chains when I stand up and torque in top gear.

    Who makes the truly best chains or am I better off just using mid grade chains and putting a new one on every month or 2.

    I would think for big strong guy's there would be a market for like a 6 speed cassette that is bigger and beefier with a heavy duty ring gear and a little bigger chain size like on how they do motorcycles?

    I am afraid to stand up and torque in top gear because I am afraid of getting hurt when the chain snaps.

    Thanks for insight.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    183
    How about not standing while in top gear? If your purpose is to gain more speed, select a lower gear and speed up, then go to top gear

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    That is a reply you would expect from a girl.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6
    It's just a fact of life...depending on your size/power, you're going to break stuff if you try to muscle everything. That said, SRAM's 991 CrossStep chain has been the strongest I've used, if you're running 9 spd.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Thanks, they really don't make the options like they do in motorcycles. I would think they could make a little heavier setup just a touch and it would sell.

    When I hit hills I am getting to the point where I do not want to down shift and just want to stand up and mash. I just changed my cassette and put a new chain on. I snapped a chain last week.

    I am real scared to stand up and mash and apply full strenght because of this.

    For a big strong guy they should make better drive components even if it is a limited market, on my CR 500 it was like add stiff springs and do a revalve to the susoension with an extra clutch plate and heavy clutch springs and you were there.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hey_poolboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    478
    I've only snapped one chain, but I've torn up cassettes. (see my thread on that) I am a very fit and strong guy, but I've resigned to the fact that I have to learn to sit and spin in order to save my equipment.So far my time hasn't suffered, and my cardio is getting a lot better. :-)

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 4

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    It slows me down on hills to sit down and I can never accelerate the way I want in tall gears because I have snapped a chain before and busted my a$$ bad.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    829
    You wouldn't ride a motorbike like that. If you rode up a hill on a motorbike and just gave it a big helping of throttle, you'd possibly just slow and stall. You'd change down a gear or two then give it some beans. Same on a bike. Wippermann chains seem to come out best in tests but the straight load needed to snap an average 10 speed bike chain is about 2000lbs.
    Take the advice and learn to use the gears to your best advantage. I doubt you ride everywhere spinning out in top gear so stop stamping and work smarter instead of harder. That or fund your new invention!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    I did not have to downshift my CR 500 and you got good life out of a good chain, the motorcycle never hurt me when it snapped a chain but the bike has.

    I just play ride and have snapped 3 or 4, I ride top gear 80 to 90% of the time and FL is flat. I go faster up a grade by standing and mashing and not downshifting.

    I trust a new chain for about a month of mashing then I will not stand and mash any more. POP! and me almost going over the bars. I hurt my knee good once because of this.
    They should sell a heavier setup not much just a little.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    829
    What bike are you riding and what are the gears on it? What chains are you using?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Saul Lumikko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,801
    Sounds more like poor installation than defective chains to me.

    Most 3/32 chains we use are stronger than 1/8 chains these guys use:



    Just get the chain properly installed instead of thinking you're stronger than you really are. Your legs aren't snapping chains, it's the mechanic.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    An NFL style clyde who weighs 300 pounds plus mashing and is strong will put way more abuse on a chain than that guy.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by TooTallUK View Post
    What bike are you riding and what are the gears on it? What chains are you using?
    Right now I am running a RH 23 inch with MTX's 33 29's and 46 11 tooth gearing, 90% of the time I am in 11 tooth and 46th tooth ring. I can pull this with no problem and will probably be going to a 50 shortly.

    What happens is the tight turn of the 11 tooth sprocket smokes the chains faster, no matter what chain I have used so far they get smoked quick. I have run 50$ chains and popped them. I think I need to go to a 50 + tooth ring so I can get off the bottom sprocket to keep from burning the chains up'

    I street ride and throw in off road obstacles at high speed, after riding my CR 500 for 25 years the bike is like slow motion so I try and spice it up the best I can.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    829
    Just so you know - with 26" wheels, a terribly slow 60rpm cadence and 11:46 gearing, you'd be averaging just under 18 mph. If you were up to a more normal 90rpm, that would see a speed of over 26mph.
    Kulhavy won the 2012 Olympic Cross Country Mountain Bike race with an average speed of 14.2 mph.
    Your country needs you.

  15. #15
    Big Gulps, Alright!
    Reputation: Berkley's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,223
    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    An NFL style clyde who weighs 300 pounds plus mashing and is strong will put way more abuse on a chain than that guy.
    It's not about weight, it's about power. That guy puts down WAY more power than you, or me, or any of the rest of the guys on this forum.

    That's Robert Forstemann. He squats 600lbs. And his bike is geared higher than yours.
    Axle Standards Explained

    Founder at North Atlantic Dirt, riding & writing about trails in the northeast.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley View Post
    It's not about weight, it's about power. That guy puts down WAY more power than you, or me, or any of the rest of the guys on this forum.

    That's Robert Forstemann. He squats 600lbs. And his bike is geared higher than yours.
    Power? legs are a joke, Now 65 HP at 6000 RPM in a 225 pound package is a OK running set of legs on a off road bike.

    I have trimmed down and I am now 280. I have 30 more to go. I was up to 325 playing around in the gym, that guy has a much shorter stroke. I had guys in the gym who could squat 600 pounds and there were things in the gym I could do with my legs they had problems with and could not do. Most of the reason was because my knees were twice their size.



    That guy moves 600 pounds but it is over short distance, HP is the amount of work you do moving weight over a distance and in what amount of time. I do not know who that guy is but a 300 pound or 350 pound clyde mashing the petal with full force of all their weight will put more force on the chain than a 200 pound guy with short legs.

    Some of your NFL lineman are going to be able to squat 600 pounds with no problem. I was able to pick 500 pounds up with my shoulders on a Smith Machine with no problem playing around in the gym with my legs. So lifting 600 pounds with your legs is not really that big of a deal now mastering a squat to be able to do it takes more effort and technic.

    When the smaller guy mashes the bike will go forward and not put as much torque on the chain because he is much lighter, the heavier guy has his weight stretching the chain as well as his power stroke. Not only that he's jumping on the chain with a lot more weight.

    If you were to take a NFL style lineman and your guy and measure the force exerted on the chain you would see the strong 325 pounder is applying easily more force to the chain because of all his extra weight plus the longer stroke.

    I ride a 2xl and have the seat post 10 inches up and I am jumping on the chain from that height, I need to get around to buying some 200mm cranks because I think it would help me allot.

    The lighter strong guy will go alot faster for sure but he is not exerting the force on a chain like a strong clyde does.

    One last thing I am hard on chains for whatever reason, I used to break chains on the gym equipment all the time in the gym.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by TooTallUK View Post
    Just so you know - with 26" wheels, a terribly slow 60rpm cadence and 11:46 gearing, you'd be averaging just under 18 mph. If you were up to a more normal 90rpm, that would see a speed of over 26mph.
    Kulhavy won the 2012 Olympic Cross Country Mountain Bike race with an average speed of 14.2 mph.
    Your country needs you.
    I am not mountain biking, I have serious limitations being my size. I know this from MOTOX motorcycles. I road ride on my modified MTB and make my own trails along the way. I average in between 20 to 30 MPH, I think? I have a 15 MPH Super Z lawn mower and I am using that as a reference. It probably does not count.

  18. #18
    Big Gulps, Alright!
    Reputation: Berkley's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,223
    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    Power? legs are a joke, Now 65 HP at 6000 RPM in a 225 pound package is a OK running set of legs on a off road bike.

    I have trimmed down and I am now 280. I have 30 more to go. I was up to 325 playing around in the gym, that guy has a much shorter stroke. I had guys in the gym who could squat 600 pounds and there were things in the gym I could do with my legs they had problems with and could not do. Most of the reason was because my knees were twice their size.



    That guy moves 600 pounds but it is over short distance, HP is the amount of work you do moving weight over a distance and in what amount of time. I do not know who that guy is but a 300 pound or 350 pound clyde mashing the petal with full force of all their weight will put more force on the chain than a 200 pound guy with short legs.

    Some of your NFL lineman are going to be able to squat 600 pounds with no problem. I was able to pick 500 pounds up with my shoulders on a Smith Machine with no problem playing around in the gym with my legs. So lifting 600 pounds with your legs is not really that big of a deal now mastering a squat to be able to do it takes more effort and technic.

    When the smaller guy mashes the bike will go forward and not put as much torque on the chain because he is much lighter, the heavier guy has his weight stretching the chain as well as his power stroke. Not only that he's jumping on the chain with a lot more weight.

    If you were to take a NFL style lineman and your guy and measure the force exerted on the chain you would see the strong 325 pounder is applying easily more force to the chain because of all his extra weight plus the longer stroke.

    I ride a 2xl and have the seat post 10 inches up and I am jumping on the chain from that height, I need to get around to buying some 200mm cranks because I think it would help me allot.

    The lighter strong guy will go alot faster for sure but he is not exerting the force on a chain like a strong clyde does.

    One last thing I am hard on chains for whatever reason, I used to break chains on the gym equipment all the time in the gym.
    There's so much bad logic/facts/math in here that I don't even know where to begin. In fact, I'm not even going to waste my time.

    I don't know how us mortals are even able to ride our bikes with our skinny chicken legs. Especially those guys that ride across France. I think they go pretty fast, but I'm not sure because I don't have a lawn mower to compare them to.
    Axle Standards Explained

    Founder at North Atlantic Dirt, riding & writing about trails in the northeast.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Joules's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,812
    if the OP were going to be convinced, which it's pretty clear he is not...

    try taking a new bike chain, hanging it from something, then hang weights on it till it breaks.
    the answer is going to be north of 10,000#. Regardless of your size, regardless of the gear you're in, you aren't putting anywhere near the breaking load on the chain. not even 1/10th. Chains break because of side loading, side loading happens because of poor installation. If you side loaded your moto chain it would break too.

    if you want another fun experiment, try doing the same with a 10s chain and a single. You'll find the breaking strength about the same.

  20. #20
    Warrior's Society
    Reputation: mtnbikej's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    6,465
    This almost as fun as the Jeep Bike thread.
    I resolve to constantly assert my honest opinion on anything and everything - whether it is requested or not.
    Bucky the Cat

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley View Post
    There's so much bad logic/facts/math in here that I don't even know where to begin. In fact, I'm not even going to waste my time.

    I don't know how us mortals are even able to ride our bikes with our skinny chicken legs. Especially those guys that ride across France. I think they go pretty fast, but I'm not sure because I don't have a lawn mower to compare them to.

    What I am saying is I am getting old and I have given up riding my custom made Cr 500's. I am riding a bike and enjoy it but it sucks for speed compared to my old dirt bike. YES LEGS SUCK and are slower than chit!

    My 72 Super Z ROCKS! we would run it down the road or where ever beside the bike to get an idea how fast I am averaging. It's will mow at 15, it's a real cool lawnmower. The new Super Z will mow at 17.

    Don't get me wrong the bicycling is cool but I am used to real power and my ass doesn't have it.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    They would say the same thing about the equipment in the gym and I would snap the chains on that stuff on a regular basis.

    I am back in the gym now after a 3 year leave and I think I am over the hill for sure. I hurt my self the other day.

    Messed one of my titties up doing curls, grabbed a 50 and started curling it after not working out for all that time and my little girly chest could not take it.

  23. #23
    **** this ****
    Reputation: Zowie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,858
    I feel your pain, I shred chains too, but I know I'm the fastest when I shift into the two smallest gears--I mean, they're the lightest, so they HAVE to be the fastest. DUH!

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    668
    Bad logic or not, weight does factor into it. Its 300 lbs standing on a 175mm lever, that equals torque to the rear end. Now add muscle power and that torque gets even higher.

    I agree with the side loading comment but the fact that the torque is so much more than a typical rider, the drivetrain is much more sensitive to small misalignments that a small guy wouldn't have to worry about.

  25. #25
    I Strava Hamburgers
    Reputation: 14Stone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    724
    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    try taking a new bike chain, hanging it from something, then hang weights on it till it breaks.
    the answer is going to be north of 10,000#. Regardless of your size, regardless of the gear you're in, you aren't putting anywhere near the breaking load on the chain. not even 1/10th. Chains break because of side loading, side loading happens because of poor installation. If you side loaded your moto chain it would break too.
    OP, the above post is 100% true.

    The ONLY time I've seen people break a chain is during cross cassette shifting during a heavy climb without laying off a second to move gears.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Saul Lumikko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,801
    Even with 300 lbs on a 175 mm lever and a chainring half that radius (doubling the torque) and the rider mashing down full strength is not enough to break a properly installed chain.

    Just get it installed properly, run the chain as straight as possible when you mash and you're golden.

    Saddle height has nothing to do with the amount of force you put on the chain when you mash. If anything, the torque at "cranks vertical" is smaller when the saddle is high, because the fulcrum is further away.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    If I ride hard everyday 15 to 20 miles I can burn a chain and sprocket every month, what happens is because I am in the 11th sprocket mostly it hooks it then stretches the chain and the chain pops.

    It was the same thing on MY cr500, the front sprocket hooks then it would trash the chain then when the chain was stretched it would ride on top the rear sprocket teeth and bend them and destroy the whole setup pre maturely.

    If I change the 11th tooth sprocket out before it starts wearing the chain out it may save chain life.

    I am down right now, I crashed the other day and cracked some ribs and did not know it then went to the gym and messed myself up by lifting weight with banged up ribs.

    My whole rib cage on one side practically collapsed on one side while curling 50 pound dumbbells and I could not figure out at the time it was from a crash earlier in the week on the bicycle.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by Sasquatch1413 View Post
    Bad logic or not, weight does factor into it. Its 300 lbs standing on a 175mm lever, that equals torque to the rear end. Now add muscle power and that torque gets even higher.

    I agree with the side loading comment but the fact that the torque is so much more than a typical rider, the drivetrain is much more sensitive to small misalignments that a small guy wouldn't have to worry about.
    Sasquatch knows, he is probably 10 times stronger than any man will ever be!

  29. #29
    My Brain Hurts!
    Reputation: ProfGumby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    699
    I don't normally jump into melees such as this...

    But I also am 5'11" and bring 280 to the party. I can leg press more than 500 pounds in one shot and regularly do reps of 280. I have never broken a chain. My problem with my bikes is not keeping the drive line clean. I ride a lot of sandy soil and this can be problematic. On my 2010 Giant I have changed the chain 4 times, the rear cassette once and recently the whole friggin crank and bb!
    Other than the chains, the cassette removed last fall was the stock model. The same with the cranks last week. The bb was changed to accommodate the new cranks.
    Opinions on a lot of stock components (especially on entry level area bikes) is that it is adequate. Get a guy like me on a bike and there will be wear.
    I have to wonder, aside from possibly cross chaining, does shifting under a huge load or at, um, inopportune times come into play here too? I know a few guys, half my weight that can break any chain withing a years time. It has to also come from not only installation, but riding and shifting habits as well as maintenance of these components too. Every chain on the market cannot suck... BTW, I am more than pleased with the mid tier Shimano chains..
    Just my 2 cents..take it for what it is worth...
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Shifting under a load will snap a chain with no problem, I destroyed a 50$ chain doing this.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    The other day I just snapped my Suntour arm off the crank so poowee on you people who say the drive trains are strong enough.

  32. #32
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,502
    I was getting massive amounts of pinch flats for a few weeks. I found the mechanical reason and fixed it. It was not because i was big. My bike was making some crazy creaks when i torqued. I found the mechanical reason and fixed it. It was not because i was big.

    You say your chest and ribs went out on you while curling. What kind of freaking flailing poor form are you using that curling a dumbbell hurt your chest!? To me that said a lot about how you are riding. "I dont down shift, its faster to mash" goes hand in hand with "I dont curl what my biceps can lift, i go 20 lbs heavier and spaz my torso to get the weight up". Isolate the muscle; use proper form and weight and even a broken rib wont do more than twinge a bit. Using the correct gear and cadence will maintain your speed and power output with out jacking your equipment up.

    You have gotten advice from other big men in this thread on how to NOT break your chain. You have chosen to ignore that advice. Your issue is either mechanical or technique, not the torque you and most people on this sub forum are able to put out.

    Let me leave you with this gem....

    The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which unskilled individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly rating their ability much higher than average. This bias is attributed to a metacognitive inability of the unskilled to recognize their mistakes.

    Actual competence may weaken self-confidence, as competent individuals may falsely assume that others have an equivalent understanding. David Dunning and Justin Kruger of Cornell University conclude, "the miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others".

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRingGrinder View Post
    I was getting massive amounts of pinch flats for a few weeks. I found the mechanical reason and fixed it. It was not because i was big. My bike was making some crazy creaks when i torqued. I found the mechanical reason and fixed it. It was not because i was big.

    You say your chest and ribs went out on you while curling. What kind of freaking flailing poor form are you using that curling a dumbbell hurt your chest!? To me that said a lot about how you are riding. "I dont down shift, its faster to mash" goes hand in hand with "I dont curl what my biceps can lift, i go 20 lbs heavier and spaz my torso to get the weight up". Isolate the muscle; use proper form and weight and even a broken rib wont do more than twinge a bit. Using the correct gear and cadence will maintain your speed and power output with out jacking your equipment up.

    You have gotten advice from other big men in this thread on how to NOT break your chain. You have chosen to ignore that advice. Your issue is either mechanical or technique, not the torque you and most people on this sub forum are able to put out.

    Let me leave you with this gem....

    The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which unskilled individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly rating their ability much higher than average. This bias is attributed to a metacognitive inability of the unskilled to recognize their mistakes.

    Actual competence may weaken self-confidence, as competent individuals may falsely assume that others have an equivalent understanding. David Dunning and Justin Kruger of Cornell University conclude, "the miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others".
    I had problems curling in the gym because I broke my ribs on the bike when I crashed and did not realize it until I went to the gym and starting doing curls with 50 pounds.

    My cranks developed a small crack in the middle and over time just snapped from flexing, aluminum does break with fatigue over time flexing. I go through drive stuff and I need to get a good setup because I can get hurt with this stuff breaking when it lets go.

    I have no problem pulling the gearing, I am going up from 46 11 to like 53 12 or 11 to get to the next level of leg strength, I only have to down shift on steep grades other than that I stand and mash.

    I am getting to the point where I stand a lot more with no problem getting tired when mashing so I am happy with my progress just want to get a drive train I can trust not to break.
    Last edited by Realslowww; 11-24-2013 at 02:38 PM.

  34. #34
    **** this ****
    Reputation: Zowie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,858
    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I am getting to the point where I stand a lot more with no problem getting tired when mashing so I am happy with my progress just want to get a drive train I can trust not to break.
    All you have to do is learn to maintain it properly, or get someone else to.

    Complaining isn't going to help.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by Zowie View Post
    All you have to do is learn to maintain it properly, or get someone else to.

    Complaining isn't going to help.
    I talked with the place that sold me the bike, the cranks can break. I ordered some better cranks and I will be changing my chain out and gears on a regular basis so I quit snapping chains.

    On hills when I stand and mash is when the problems happens, last chain I broke was doing this and the arm snapping as well. I will be going along at about 5 or 10 MPH and a hill will come up and I stand and mash and the drive train breaks.

    It always happens when I apply full power, if I just power up slowly and not accelerate as hard I usually do not have problems. I have been in the gym and my legs are getting stronger again and pulling that gearing all the time is no problem now.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    829
    You've refused to change the way you ride so you'll keep trashing stuff. Given your refusal to change gears I recommend you convert to single speed. The heavier chain and inability for you to screw the chain line up by mashing in the wrong gears will reduce you breaking things so often.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by TooTallUK View Post
    You've refused to change the way you ride so you'll keep trashing stuff. Given your refusal to change gears I recommend you convert to single speed. The heavier chain and inability for you to screw the chain line up by mashing in the wrong gears will reduce you breaking things so often.
    I was not aware single speed uses a heavier chain, can I change my 9 cassette to like 5 and run a bigger chain? I do shift but only when I have to. When BIG hills come up I really shift down. It is just my legs are getting stout and I rarely have to shift now and I am breaking the drive about every other month.

    I want to be able to apply full torque and with good cranks and changing the chain like once a month or every other month should solve the problem. The chain did not snap this time the crank broke.

    Last time I applied full torque on a hill the chain broke, I generally do not apply full power instantly because of this reason. This stuff does wear and needs to be changed out regularly if you put a good load on it.

    Single speed will not work for me, sometimes I need gears.

  38. #38
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,502
    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I will be going along at about 5 or 10 MPH and a hill will come up and I stand and mash and the drive train breaks.
    I thought you always went 20 - 30 LMPH (lawn mowers per hour).

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    4,511
    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I will be going along at about 5 or 10 MPH and a hill will come up and I stand and mash and the drive train breaks.
    You have no business being in the 11T cassette sprocket at that speed.

    If for some reason you feel the need to do that (which would be like going 10mph in 6th gear in your car), and the chain breaks, it was installed wrong or something else is mechanically wrong. You didn't break it because you are too strong. You bring narcissism to a whole new level if you think your strength broke it.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tystevens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,826
    I'm just in awe of the OP's power, stamina, and riding prowess. To think that in 15 years of riding, weighing as much as 265#, and what I've always thought were pretty strong legs, I've never developed the power to break even a single chain, let alone numerous chains. I really need to pick it up!

    Good luck OP!
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
    '13 Felt Z4 for the road

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    You have no business being in the 11T cassette sprocket at that speed.

    If for some reason you feel the need to do that (which would be like going 10mph in 6th gear in your car), and the chain breaks, it was installed wrong or something else is mechanically wrong. You didn't break it because you are too strong. You bring narcissism to a whole new level if you think your strength broke it.
    I put the bike on a bench at the local shop about every month or 2 and they go over it and adjust it, I am going to be blunt, My Cr 500's would kick my a$$ and never fail unless I did something stupid! My MTB is flimsy in comparison, you act like this is a big. IT IS NOT!

    If I can leave my CR 500 in 5th and shread a berm and not shift at low speed and never have a problem why can't I do it on my bicycle?

    They need to step up and make these things more like the motor bike counterparts, I know weight is a problem when dealing with cheesy girly human legs but I am not impressed with the build quality of the drive on my bicycle.

    These bicycles compared to a modern MX motorcycle are spindly to say the least, they are now making them better however but they should make a slightly better chain setup for people who have more output than average.

  42. #42
    **** this ****
    Reputation: Zowie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,858
    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post

    If I can leave my CR 500 in 5th and shread a berm and not shift at low speed and never have a problem why can't I do it on my bicycle?
    It's called "chain line", and learning about it would save you and everyone else time...

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by Zowie View Post
    It's called "chain line", and learning about it would save you and everyone else time...
    When my cranks arrive I will have the local bike shop look at it, if there was a problem I believe they would have said something when checking my bike out. If I run the chain on the big ring and the small sprocket how do you change the line to where it makes less stress.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by Tystevens View Post
    I'm just in awe of the OP's power, stamina, and riding prowess. To think that in 15 years of riding, weighing as much as 265#, and what I've always thought were pretty strong legs, I've never developed the power to break even a single chain, let alone numerous chains. I really need to pick it up!

    Good luck OP!
    I think it is the way I run the 11 tooth all the time is stretching and wearing the chain out. I am road riding so pulling that gear is no problem, on a trail specially in FL with sand no way I could pull that.

    These chains in the right circumstance are not that hard to break.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Saul Lumikko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,801
    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    If I run the chain on the big ring and the small sprocket how do you change the line to where it makes less stress.
    Switch the big chainring to a larger size so you'll have the same overall ratio on a larger cog, which is closer to a straight chainline.

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    Switch the big chainring to a larger size so you'll have the same overall ratio on a larger cog, which is closer to a straight chainline.
    Thanks. Will do, I am going to 53 12 n 13 to try and fix my problem. I am not trying to make a big deal out of this. I can get hurt when this happens all the time. I got old creaky joints from to much CR 500 action and I have to watch it.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    4,511
    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I put the bike on a bench at the local shop about every month or 2 and they go over it and adjust it, I am going to be blunt, My Cr 500's would kick my a$$ and never fail unless I did something stupid! My MTB is flimsy in comparison, you act like this is a big. IT IS NOT!

    If I can leave my CR 500 in 5th and shread a berm and not shift at low speed and never have a problem why can't I do it on my bicycle?

    They need to step up and make these things more like the motor bike counterparts, I know weight is a problem when dealing with cheesy girly human legs but I am not impressed with the build quality of the drive on my bicycle.

    These bicycles compared to a modern MX motorcycle are spindly to say the least, they are now making them better however but they should make a slightly better chain setup for people who have more output than average.
    I'm not trying to be rude but nobody cares about your motorcycle dude, it has zero relevance to the topic. What you're doing would be equivalent to complaining that your Bob The Builder play set hammer can't break concrete the way your jackhammer can.

    You would have a cadence of about 10 when you're in that gear combination at 5-10mph, which is FAR from efficient.

    Your output isn't above average, you are abusing your equipment. I can squat over 500lbs and deadlift over 600 and the only time I've ever broken a chain is when shifting under high load before learning proper pedaling technique. Point being, you're doing it wrong and if you respond with anything other than "thanks for the tip, I'll fix my incorrect riding style", you are ignorant.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    I'm not trying to be rude but nobody cares about your motorcycle dude, it has zero relevance to the topic. What you're doing would be equivalent to complaining that your Bob The Builder play set hammer can't break concrete the way your jackhammer can.

    You would have a cadence of about 10 when you're in that gear combination at 5-10mph, which is FAR from efficient.

    Your output isn't above average, you are abusing your equipment. I can squat over 500lbs and deadlift over 600 and the only time I've ever broken a chain is when shifting under high load before learning proper pedaling technique. Point being, you're doing it wrong and if you respond with anything other than "thanks for the tip, I'll fix my incorrect riding style", you are ignorant.
    So what do you tell the single speed crowd? I do shift but only when I have to. Same on my CR 500 and the equipment never complained.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pablobell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    130
    I'm taking a power cookie out on my next ride. I better make sure I drop a couple of extra chains in my camelbak too.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by pablobell View Post
    I'm taking a power cookie out on my next ride. I better make sure I drop a couple of extra chains in my camelbak too.
    I don't run more than 20 or 25 miles a day so I could use lots of power cookies.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Skipping chain on high gears
    By tsjwdf in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-28-2013, 05:00 AM
  2. WD-40 offically entering chain lube market
    By sopwithcamel in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 74
    Last Post: 05-06-2013, 09:52 AM
  3. gears or chain device first?
    By tim.johnston in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-21-2011, 07:45 AM
  4. Chain skips gears after new derailer
    By jeepnphreak in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-29-2011, 01:58 PM
  5. Chain jumping in low gears...WTF??
    By Waafoo in forum Colorado - Front Range
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-14-2011, 07:48 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •